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Newman Named Dean of Arts and Sciences

April 26, 2010
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: Dennis O’Shea
443-287-9960
dro@jhu.edu

Katherine S. Newman, a widely published expert on poverty and the working poor who has led major interdisciplinary initiatives at Princeton and Harvard universities, has been appointed dean of the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences at The Johns Hopkins University.

Newman will assume the Krieger School’s James B. Knapp Deanship on Sept. 1, said Ronald J. Daniels, president of the university. K Newman-2 RWK-small 4-2010

Daniels called Newman a “distinguished scholar, veteran academic leader and talented and enthusiastic educator.”

“Katherine is committed to the enhancement of undergraduate education and undergraduate life at Johns Hopkins, to strengthened support for graduate students and to strategic development of the Krieger School faculty,” Daniels said. “Most important, she is committed to preserving and enriching the academic excellence of the Krieger School and building on its foundational role in higher education.”

Newman is now the Malcolm Stevenson Forbes ’41 Professor in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and the Department of Sociology at Princeton University, where she has taught since 2004. Since 2007, she has directed Princeton’s university-wide Institute for International and Regional Studies. She founded and chairs its joint doctoral program in social policy, sociology, and politics and psychology.

Previously, during eight years at Harvard University, she was the first dean of social science at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. While there, she designed a university-wide research program in the social sciences, promoting collaboration among faculty from the arts and sciences, public health, medicine, law and education. She also has served on the faculties of Columbia University and the University of California, Berkeley.

Newman said she was excited to be joining Johns Hopkins in a position that will bring her into contact with leading scholars in a wide range of fields in the arts, humanities, social sciences and sciences.

Leading an enterprise like the Krieger School is “problem solving in the company of smart, productive, and effervescent people,” she said. “What better life could any of us hope for?  Johns Hopkins has a well-deserved reputation for excellence and the chance to work with my colleagues in the Krieger School, many of whom I’ve known for a long time as a fellow scholar, is just too good an opportunity to pass up.”

Newman, who has written or co-authored nine books and has two more in progress, has focused much of her scholarly work on the lives of the working poor and mobility up and down the economic ladder. She also has investigated the impact of tax policy on the poor, the history of public opinion’s impact on poverty policy, school violence, and the impact of globalization on young people in Italy, Spain, Japan and South Africa, among other issues.

Newman graduated in 1975 from the University of California, San Diego, where she majored in sociology and philosophy. She earned a Ph.D. in anthropology in 1979 from the University of California, Berkeley.

As dean, she succeeds Adam F. Falk, who left Johns Hopkins to become president of Williams College.

Note: Digital images are available. Contact Dennis O’Shea. A webcast of Katherine Newman’s introduction to the Johns Hopkins community is archived at http://tinyurl.com/dean-intro.

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President Ronald J. Daniels sent this broadcast e-mail message to Johns Hopkins University faculty, students and staff on Monday, April 26, announcing the appointment of Katherine S. Newman as the James B. Knapp Dean of the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences.

Dear Faculty, Students and Staff:

Provost Minor and I are delighted to announce that a distinguished scholar, veteran academic leader and talented and enthusiastic educator will join Johns Hopkins as the next James B. Knapp Dean of the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences.

The executive committee of the Board of Trustees agreed today to our recommendation that Katherine S. Newman be appointed to the post, effective Sept. 1.

Dr. Newman is the Malcolm Stevenson Forbes ’41 Professor in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and the Department of Sociology at Princeton University, where she has taught since 2004. Since 2007, she has directed Princeton’s university-wide Institute for International and Regional Studies. She founded and chairs its joint doctoral program in social policy, sociology, politics and psychology.

Previously, during eight years at Harvard University, she was the first dean of social science at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. She also has served on the faculties of Columbia University and the University of California, Berkeley.

Dr. Newman was selected after an international search in which nearly 80 distinguished scholars from the full array of academic disciplines were considered. Colleagues and peers offered only the highest praise not only for her significant and internationally recognized scholarly accomplishments (she has published nine books), but also for her skills as an academic leader, her passion as a teacher and her extensive record as a devoted and valued university citizen.

Katherine is committed to the enhancement of undergraduate education and undergraduate life at Johns Hopkins, to strengthened support for graduate students and to strategic development of the Krieger School faculty. Most important, she is committed to preserving and enriching the academic excellence of the Krieger School and building on its foundational role in higher education.

Katherine has demonstrated significant and inspired academic leadership over the years. At Princeton, she successfully integrated separate programs in international and regional studies into a unified institute on global affairs with a collaborative interdisciplinary approach to scholarship and teaching. At Harvard, she designed a university-wide research program in the social sciences, bringing together faculty from the arts and sciences, public health, medicine, law and education to collaborate on new areas of scholarship. Her success in faculty recruitment and fund raising for the Radcliffe Institute and her leadership of National Science Foundation training programs significantly enhanced the social sciences at Harvard.

Katherine understands and appreciates the power of what she calls “discipline-plus” research and learning. She embraces the solid foundation provided by a “home” discipline but encourages the enhanced insight and breakthrough advances that arise when scholars of diverse backgrounds stimulate each other’s thinking. This approach will serve her well in the Krieger School, which has a long, distinguished history of initiating collaborative efforts across departmental and divisional lines. This, of course, also aligns with our commitment to realizing the full promise of multi-school collaborations within and across our university.

Provost Minor and I invite you to join us for Dean-elect Newman’s introduction as a member of the Johns Hopkins community. We will gather tomorrow, Tuesday, April 27, at 9 a.m. in Mason Hall Auditorium at Homewood.

I want to thank Provost Minor and all the members of his search committee, whose hard work and devotion of time, energy and experience have led to this outstanding appointment. I also thank Interim Dean Michela Gallagher, who generously has committed herself to guiding the Krieger School until Dr. Newman’s arrival.

An abbreviated version of Katherine Newman’s CV is available at http://releases.jhu.edu/2010/04/26/dean-cv/ and more information will be published in next week’s Gazette. In the meantime, please join Provost Minor and me in welcoming her most warmly to the Krieger School and to Johns Hopkins.

Sincerely,
Ronald J. Daniels


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