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Johns Hopkins Museums November to February Highlights

October 27, 2014
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Heather Egan Stalfort
410-516-0341, ext. 17
hestalfort@jhu.edu

Making a Museum: The Peale Family in Early Baltimore
On view December 4, 2014 through May 31, 2015
Location: Homewood Museum
Cost: Included with paid museum admission and on view as part of the guided tour or $3 for the exhibition only.

Charles Willson Peale, his sons, nieces and nephew were artists and naturalists whose portraits, miniatures, still lifes and silhouettes provide an eloquent and detailed chronicle of the most notable people and events of the republic’s early history. In addition to a selection of the family’s Baltimore-related artwork, this focus exhibition explores the origins and continued development of the landmark museum and portrait gallery opened in Baltimore by Rembrandt Peale in 1814, and which now is poised to reopen after restoration as the Peale Center for Baltimore History and Architecture. The exhibition is curated by Johns Hopkins University students in the Museums & Society course, Curating Homewood.

Repoussé Style, Then and Now: A Celebration of the Art of Michael Izrael Galmer
On view Dec. 11, 2014 through July 19, 2015
Opening Reception: Thursday, Dec. 11, 6-8 p.m. $8 public, free for members and Johns Hopkins students

Location: Evergreen Museum & Library
Cost: Included with paid museum admission and on view as part of the guided tour.

The ancient metalworking technique of repoussé, the art of raising ornament in relief from the reverse side, has a rich history. In America, repoussé-style silver became associated early on with Baltimore, largely through the influence of the China Trade and its introduction of complementary carved and ornamented wares. From the mid-19th century through the post-World War II era, repoussé became a kind of esthetic moniker for the “Monument City.” This often ornate style fell out of fashion in the last quarter of the 20th century, but has since seen a resurgence of interest nationwide, in part through the modern interpretations and applications of contemporary Russian-émigré silversmith Michael Izrael Galmer. This exhibition brings together thirty important pieces of Galmer’s silverwork and jewelry, displayed alongside historical examples of repoussé flatware and hollowware from the Evergreen Museum & Library collection.

LENS TO PAGE: THE PHOTOGRAPHER’S BOOK AT EVERGREEN
On view Dec. 11 through Feb. 1, 2015
Opening Reception: Dec. 11, 6-8 p.m. $8 public, free for members and Johns Hopkins students

Location: Evergreen Museum & Library

Cost: Included with paid museum admission and on view as part of the guided tour.

This exhibition celebrates the concept of the artist book as envisioned by eight Johns Hopkins University photography students in the course, Lens to Page: The Photographer’s Book. More than just bound pages, artist books use many different photographic and design techniques to explore an artist’s particular thought or vision. Ranging in subjects from sleep-induced dreams and the personalization of living spaces to documenting one’s own private moments, these impressive works inspire reflection and dialogue.

FINERY & FINISH: EMBELLISHMENTS ON BALTIMORE FEDERAL FURNITURE
On view through Jan. 4, 2015
Location: Homewood Museum
Cost: Included with paid museum admission and on view as part of the guided tour.

Furniture making emerged as one of Baltimore’s most significant art forms from the end of the 1700s through the first quarter of the 19th century. Cabinet shops flourished throughout the bustling port city, and there was great demand for “fancy furniture” by a newly rich mercantile elite eager to furnish their Federal-style houses in the latest fashions. Interpreting English prototypes and designs, a highly skilled group of cabinetmakers became specialists in inlay, gilding, carving, and painted decoration, and created a distinctly Baltimore style through the choice and execution of these opulent, yet refined, finishing touches. Bringing together an exceptional group of tables, sideboards, desks, chairs, and other furniture pieces drawn mostly from private collections, this exhibition highlights the original designs and decorative forms of Baltimore craftsmen, and particularly those favored by Homewood’s original owners, Charles and Harriet Chew Carroll.

FROM HERE TO ETERNITY: The Symbolism of Evergreen’s ‘Eight Immortals’ Scrolls
On view through May. 31, 2015
Location: Evergreen Museum & Library
Cost: Included with paid museum admission and on view as part of the guided tour.

In the early 1920s, Russian stage designer and artist Léon Bakst acquired an imposing series of late 18th-century red and gold painted Chinese scrolls for Evergreen as part of his avant-garde decorative scheme for a new dining room. Each scroll identifies one of the Eight Immortals, ancient figures empowered by a unique attribute that could extend life, bestow wealth, or destroy evil. This focus exhibition pushes beyond the decorative aspects of the scrolls to reveal a more nuanced appreciation of the fascinating mythological figures that inhabit them. Also on display are related works from the museum’s permanent collection. The exhibition is guest curated by Shilei Chen, a junior from China majoring in history of art at Johns Hopkins University.

SILHOUETTES FOR THE HOLIDAYS
Nov. 16, noon-4 p.m.
Location: Homewood Museum
Cost: $40 for two copies of one silhouette (includes museum admission). Custom-made oval mats and rare frame styles will be available for sale on site. Advance registration for appointment time is strongly recommended. Register by calling 410-516-5589.
 
Experience the magic scissors of historical artisan Lauren Muney, a master portraitist in the tradition of the silhouette artists of the 18th and 19th centuries, create a perfect gift for the holidays. One of the few remaining freehand-scissor artists still practicing in the Mid-Atlantic, Muney will create a traditional profile-portrait of your little (or big) ones to treasure forever—in just minutes. Proceeds will benefit Homewood Museum. For more information about Lauren Muney’s nationally-known work, visit http://www.silhouettesbyhand.com.

DISCOUNT SHOPPING DAYS
Dec. 6 through Dec. 14, museum hours
Location: Homewood Museum and Evergreen Museum & Library

Members of the Homewood and Evergreen museums, and Johns Hopkins faculty, staff and students are invited to enjoy special discounts in the Homewood and Evergreen gift shops. Everyone with a valid Johns Hopkins ID receives a 10 percent discount on all merchandise, excluding consignment items; museum members receive a 20 percent discount.

HOMEWOOD BY CANDLELIGHT
Dec. 8, 5-7 p.m.

Location: Homewood Museum
Cost: $8 public; free for members and Johns Hopkins students

Decorated for the holidays with garlands and boxwood by the Homeland Garden Club, Homewood exudes a festive spirit that is best witnessed at the museum’s annual Homewood by Candlelight open house. Glittering candlelight throughout the museum make Homewood appear as it might have in the early 19th century. The reception hall will be filled with the sounds of live music, the museum shop will offer a wide variety of holiday gift-giving ideas for people of all ages, and refreshments will be served in the wine cellar. Guests will also be able to view the museum’s special exhibitions, Finery & Finish: Embellishments on Baltimore Federal Furniture and Making a Museum: The Peale Family in Early Baltimore.

AN EVER GREEN EVENING
Dec. 11, 6-8 p.m.

Location: Evergreen Museum & Library
Cost: $8 public, free for members and Johns Hopkins students

Evergreen Museum & Library hosts its annual holiday open house, featuring creatively themed seasonal decorations; a silent auction of original “tiny” art treasures by Baltimore artists and designers; and the exciting opening of two new special exhibitions, Repoussé Style, Then and Now: A Celebration of the Art of Michael Izrael Galmer and Lens to Page: The Photographer’s Book at Evergreen. Festive holiday fare will be served and a variety of unique gifts and fresh greens harvested from Evergreen’s grounds will be available for sale in the museum shop.

HOLIDAY CARD MAKING WORKSHOP
Dec. 13, 1-3 p.m.

Location: Evergreen Museum & Library
Cost: $8 public, free for members (includes materials and museum admission). Advance registration required: 410-516-0341.

Evergreen director and curator James Abbott will lead a workshop on the art and craft of card making in the Victorian era. Reflecting the 19th-century fascination for souvenir albums and collage, participants will use an array of colorful papers, ribbons, fabrics, and printed illustrations to create holiday and gift cards. Open to all ages.

Homewood Museum, Johns Hopkins University
3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218
Tel: 410-516-5589
Email: homewoodmuseum@jhu.edu
Website: www.museums.jhu.edu
Hours: Open by guided tour offered on the hour and half-hour, Tuesday–Friday: 11 a.m.–4 p.m., Saturday–Sunday: noon–4 p.m. Last tour at 3:30 p.m. Closed Monday, as well as major holidays.
Admission: $8 adults; $7 seniors (65+) and AAA members; $5 students (with ID), youth (6–18) and Johns Hopkins alumni and retirees; Free for members, Johns Hopkins faculty, staff and students (with valid ID) and children (5 and under).

Evergreen Museum & Library, Johns Hopkins University
4545 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21210
Tel: 410-516-0341
Email: evergreenmuseum@jhu.edu
Website: www.museums.jhu.edu
Hours: Open by guided tour offered hourly on the hour, Tuesday–Friday: 11 a.m.–4 p.m., Saturday–Sunday: noon–4 p.m. Last tour at 3 p.m. Closed Monday, as well as major holidays. Free on-site parking.
Admission: $8 adults; $7 seniors (65+) and AAA members; $5 students (with ID), youth (6–18) and Johns Hopkins alumni and retirees; Free for members, Johns Hopkins faculty, staff and students (with valid ID) and children (5 and under).

 

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