About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.


Computing Tool Will Allow More Accurate Genome Sequencing

Scientists’ effort to piece together the genome is taking a significant step forward with a new computerized method that creates more complete and detailed versions of the complex puzzle of life than have ever been produced before.

Painter Catherine Kehoe to Speak at Johns Hopkins

Boston-based painter Catherine Kehoe will present slides and discuss her work on Thursday, October 27 at Johns Hopkins University.

$15 Million Establishes Clark Scholars Program

The Clark Charitable Foundation is giving the Johns Hopkins University $15 million to provide financial aid and enhanced learning opportunities for undergraduate engineering students.

Multi-Million-Dollar Research Effort Aims to Cripple Cancer’s Deadly Ability to Spread

Supported by a $9-million grant from the National Cancer Institute, a diverse team led by Johns Hopkins researchers has begun looking for new ways to attack one of the scariest traits of this disease: its frequent refusal to stay in one place.

Klag to End 12-Year Run as Dean of Public Health

Michael J. Klag, dean of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health since 2005, a 32-year member of the university community and a world expert on the epidemiology of major chronic diseases, will step down as dean next year and return to research and teaching.

Johns Hopkins Opens Major Exhibit on Edgar Allan Poe

The Enigmatic Edgar A. Poe in Baltimore & Beyond features highlights from the Susan Jaffe Tane Collection of Edgar Allan Poe, one of the finest private collections of Poe materials in the world.

When Washington Doesn’t Get America

Washington doesn’t think very highly of the American people, concludes a yearlong Johns Hopkins University study of 850 non-elected officials working in the nation’s capital.

Scientists’ Finding Supports Moon Creation Hypothesis

New research led by Johns Hopkins University scientists argues that a layer of iron and other elements deep under ground is the evidence scientists have long been seeking to support the hypothesis that the moon was formed by a planetary object hitting the infant Earth some 4.5 billion years ago.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Prepares for Annual Day of Baltimore Service

Planting, weeding and making lunches for the homeless. These are just some of the ways more than 1,000 Johns Hopkins University students, faculty and staff will try to help the city on Saturday, Sept. 24, as they volunteer en masse at more than 30 Baltimore non-profit organizations.

The Surprising Thing Blind People Doing Math Reveals About the Brain

Human babies and even animals have a basic number sense that many believe evolves from seeing the world and trying to quantify all the sights. But vision has nothing to do with it – Johns Hopkins University neuroscientists have found that the brain network behind numerical reasoning is identical in blind and sighted people.

Scientists Find New Ways to Track Stars Eaten by Black Holes

Research led by Johns Hopkins University astrophysicists using information from a NASA space telescope breaks new ground in ways to observe a star swallowed by a black hole, promising to help paint a more clear picture of this cosmic phenomenon.

For-Profit Trade Schools Prove Costly for Disadvantaged Black Youth

Young African-Americans from some of the country’s most disadvantaged neighborhoods are drawn to for-profit post-secondary trade schools, believing they are the quickest route to jobs. But a new study co-authored by a Johns Hopkins University sociologist finds the very thing that makes for-profit schools seem so appealing — a streamlined curriculum — is the reason so many poor students drop out.

Light Tames Lethal Heart Disorders in Mice and Virtual Humans

Using high-tech human heart models and mouse experiments, scientists at Johns Hopkins and Germany’s University of Bonn have shown that beams of light could replace electric shocks in patients reeling from a deadly heart rhythm disorder. The findings, published online Sept. 12 in the October 2016 edition of The Journal of Clinical Investigation, could pave the way for a new type of implantable defibrillators.

Online Master’s Degree in Data Science Now Offered at Johns Hopkins

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals, the division of Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering that offers online and part-time graduate programs, has launched a new master’s degree program in data science that students can complete online.

Kill Them With Cuteness: The Adorable Thing Bats Do to Catch Prey

Bats’ use of echolocation to detect, track and catch prey is well documented. But this Johns Hopkins team is the first to show how the relatively mysterious head and ear movements factor into the hunt.

Johns Hopkins Scientist Named to Popular Science “Brilliant 10”

Suchi Saria, a computer scientist at Johns Hopkins University, has been named as one of Popular Science’s Brilliant 10, the magazine’s annual list of the “brightest young minds in science and engineering.”

Can One Cosmic Enigma Help Solve Another?

Astrophysicists from Johns Hopkins University have proposed a clever new way of shedding light on the mysterious dark matter believed to make up most of the universe. The irony is they want to try to pin down the nature of this unexplained phenomenon by using another, an obscure cosmic emanation known as “fast radio bursts.”

MIT Technology Review Honors Johns Hopkins Engineer as a Top Young Innovator

Muyinatu A. Lediju Bell, a Johns Hopkins engineering professor who designs medical imaging systems that link light, sound and robotics to produce clearer pictures, was honored today by MIT Technology Review, which placed her on its prestigious 2016 list of 35 Innovators Under 35. The list annually spotlights the nation’s most promising young scientists.

Researchers Find Brain’s ‘Physics Engine’

Whether or not they aced it in high school, human beings are physics masters when it comes to understanding and predicting how objects in the world will behave. A Johns Hopkins University cognitive scientist has found the source of that intuition, the brain’s “physics engine.”

Research Reveals Cancer Pathway to Spreading Through the Body

Cancer cells need oxygen to survive, as do most other life forms, but scientists had never tracked their search for oxygen in their early growth stages until now — a step toward deeper understanding of one way cancer spreads that could help treat the disease.

Cyber Security Experts to Discuss Attack Defense, Response

How do hackers crack a computer system and steal data? How should organizations protect themselves? How should they prepare for and respond to attack? These are among the questions that will be addressed by experts in the field at the third annual Senior Executive Cyber Security Conference to be held Wednesday, Sept. 21 at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

Students Seek to Reduce Deaths From Battlefield Injuries That Block Breathing

When a battlefield explosion injures a soldier’s face or neck, the critical air passage between the head and lungs often becomes blocked, which can lead to brain damage and death within minutes. To help treat such injuries, a Johns Hopkins undergraduate team has designed a low-cost, low-tech device dubbed CricSpike that may boost the success rate when combat medics need to create an artificial airway and pump air into the lungs.

The Brain’s Super-Sensitivity to Curbs

Humans rely on boundaries like walls and curbs for navigation, and Johns Hopkins University researchers have pinpointed the areas of the brain most sensitive to even the tiniest borders.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Experts Available to Discuss Election Topics

The following Johns Hopkins University experts, whose research focuses on such subjects as race, economic policy, inequality, gun violence, law enforcement and health care, are available for interviews during the presidential election season.

ADVISORY: Future Engineers Use Their Noodles to Build Spaghetti Bridges

About 160 high school students at the Johns Hopkins Baltimore campus — and another 425 students across the country — will compete in the annual Spaghetti Bridge Contest, marking the culmination of a four-week summer course called Engineering Innovation.