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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.


Scientists Get First Glimpse of Black Hole Eating Star, Ejecting High-Speed Flare

An international team of astrophysicists led by a Johns Hopkins University scientist has for the first time witnessed a black hole swallowing a star and ejecting a flare of matter moving at nearly the speed of light.

Rapid Plankton Growth in Ocean Seen as Sign of Carbon Dioxide Loading

A microscopic marine alga is thriving in the North Atlantic to an extent that defies scientific predictions, suggesting swift environmental change as a result of rising carbon dioxide in the ocean, a study led a by Johns Hopkins University scientist has found.

Baltimore Welcomes 1st Pre-K-8th Engineering-Oriented School

The Johns Hopkins University and Baltimore City Schools have partnered to create the city’s first pre-K-8th grade school dedicated to giving students a foundation in engineering and computer skills.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Baltimore to Welcome 1st Engineering-Oriented School

The Johns Hopkins University and Baltimore City Schools have partnered to create the city’s first pre-K-8th grade school dedicated to giving students a foundation in engineering and computer skills.

Diamonds May Not Be So Rare As Once Thought

Diamonds may not be as rare as once believed, but this finding in a new Johns Hopkins University research report won’t mean deep discounts at local jewelry stores.

JHU Policy Institute to Discuss Maryland Statewide Test Results

The Johns Hopkins University School of Education and area educators will hold a forum next month to discuss Baltimore and Maryland results on the new Partnership for Assessments for College and Careers (PARCC) high school assessment test.

Johns Hopkins Solves a Longtime Puzzle of How We Learn

More than a century ago Pavlov figured out that dogs fed after hearing a bell eventually began to salivate when they heard the ring. A Johns Hopkins University-led research team has now figured out a key aspect of why.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Club to Dedicate Room to University’s Nobel Laureates

The Johns Hopkins Club is opening its new Nobel Room, dedicated to the 36 Johns Hopkins university faculty members, graduates and other affiliates who have won Nobel Prizes.

Tiny Dancers: Can Ballet Bugs Help Us Build Better Robots?

When it’s time to design new robots, sometimes the best inspiration can come from Mother Nature. Take, for example, her creepy, but incredibly athletic spider crickets. Johns Hopkins engineering students and their professor have spent more than eight months unraveling the hopping skills, airborne antics and safe-landing patterns of these pesky insects that commonly lurk in the dark corners of damp basements.

JHU Opens Major Exhibition Celebrating Author John Barth

The Johns Hopkins University Sheridan Libraries’ new exhibition on John Barth offers visitors a kind of funhouse experience devoted to exploring the author’s life and legacy.

Artist Jane Dickson To Speak At Johns Hopkins

New York-based artist Jane Dickson who paints on everything from sandpaper to Astroturf will present a slide talk on her work on October 29 at Johns Hopkins University.

Johns Hopkins Biologist Leads Research Shedding Light On Stem Cells

A Johns Hopkins University biologist has led a research team reporting progress in understanding the mysterious shape-shifting ways of stem cells, which have vast potential for medical research and disease treatment.

Johns Hopkins Researcher Contributes to White House Initiative on School Absenteeism

The Obama administration is enlisting help from the Johns Hopkins University in a just-announced initiative to reduce chronic absenteeism in public schools by at least 10 percent a year.

If You Made Money Buying a 1st Home in the 2000s, You Probably Weren’t Black

In a study recently published in the journal Real Estate Economics, public policy professor Sandra J. Newman and researcher C. Scott Holupka found that race was a key determinate of which low and moderate-income people who bought first homes during the decade made money. During the Great Recession, white homebuyers lost money but black ones lost considerably more. Even during the boom years, when white buyers increased their wealth by 50 percent, black buyers lost 47 percent of their wealth.

Johns Hopkins and DuPont Join Forces to Produce an Improved Ebola Protection Suit

The Johns Hopkins University and DuPont have signed license and collaboration agreements allowing DuPont to commercialize a garment with innovative features from Johns Hopkins to help protect people on the front lines of the Ebola crisis and future deadly infectious disease outbreaks. DuPont intends to have the first of these garments available in the marketplace during the first half of 2016.

Johns Hopkins Medical Robotics Pioneer Russell H. Taylor to Receive 2015 Honda Prize

Russell H. Taylor, a Johns Hopkins professor who is widely hailed as the father of medical robotics, has been selected to receive the 2015 Honda Prize. The selection was announced Sept. 28 by the Honda Foundation, which initiated this honor in 1980 as Japan’s first international science and technology award.

Johns Hopkins research on Infant Universe Takes Step Forward

An effort to peer into the origins of the universe with the most effective instrument ever used in the effort is taking a big step forward, as Johns Hopkins University scientists begin shipping a two-story-tall microwave telescope to its base in Chile.

Pieces of the Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor [CLASS] telescope will soon be packed in two 40-foot containers and sent south, as scientists get closer to taking observations of a faint, ancient electromagnetic energy that pervades the sky, holding clues about how the universe began.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Expert Available to Discuss Report on Martian Surface Water

Kevin Lewis, an expert on the geology and past climate of Mars at Johns Hopkins University, is available to discuss findings published today on evidence of surface water on Mars.

FEMA Data Official Joins Center for Government Excellence

Carter Hewgley, former head of analytics for the Federal Emergency Management Agency, has joined a Johns Hopkins University project to make cities’ data more accessible and help solve urban problems.

How the Brain Can Stop Action on a Dime

You’re about to drive through an intersection when the light suddenly turns red. But you’re able to slam on the brakes, just in time.

Johns Hopkins University researchers, working with scientists at the National Institute on Aging, have revealed the precise nerve cells that allow the brain to make this type of split-second change of course. In the latest issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience, the team shows that these feats of self control happen when neurons in the basal forebrain are silenced.

Drug for Early Alzheimer’s Heads to Clinical Trial

Johns Hopkins University researchers have received an estimated $7.5 million National Institutes of Health grant to clinically test what would be the first treatment to prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer’s dementia.

Johns Hopkins’ Ebola Protective Suit Honored in Fast Company ‘Innovation by Design Awards’

The Johns Hopkins University’s new personal protective suit for front-line health care workers in Ebola outbreaks has been honored as one of 10 finalists in the Social Good category of Fast Company’s 2015 Innovation by Design Awards.

Scientists report earlier shift in human ancestor diet

Millions of years ago our primate ancestors turned from trees and shrubs in search of food on the ground. In human evolution, that has made all the difference. The change marked a significant step toward the diverse eating habits that became a key human characteristic, and would have made these early humans more mobile and adaptable to their environment.

Hopkins scientists’ findings could shed light on cancer, aging

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have found molecular evidence of how a biochemical process controls the lengths of protective chromosome tips, a potentially significant step in ultimately understanding cancer growth and aging.