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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Posting Zika Conspiracy Theories on Social Media Could Put People at Risk

Social media posters who share unfounded conspiracy theories and pseudoscientific claims about the Zika virus may undermine upcoming efforts to keep the disease from spreading, according to a study published online today by the journal Vaccine.

Telescope Peering into Origins of the Universe Receives “First Light”

High in the Andes Mountains of northern Chile a unique Johns Hopkins University observatory has just achieved “first light,” the first time the telescope has collected radiation from space.

19 Awarded Fulbrights at Johns Hopkins

A record number of Johns Hopkins University students and recent graduates – 19 – have been named Fulbright Scholars, earning the opportunity to travel abroad to such places as Peru, Malaysia and Spain to study, teach and conduct research.

A Personalized Virtual Heart Predicts the Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

An interdisciplinary Johns Hopkins University team has developed a non-invasive 3-D virtual heart assessment tool to help doctors determine whether a particular patient faces the highest risk of a life-threatening arrhythmia and would benefit most from a defibrillator implant.

Johns Hopkins Launches New Online Master’s Degree in Financial Mathematics

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals, the division of Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering that administers online and part-time graduate programs, has launched a new financial mathematics master’s degree program that can be completed online.

Johns Hopkins Scientist Programs Robot for “Soft Tissue” Surgery

Simon Leonard, a Johns Hopkins University computer scientist is part of a team that just published research showing that a robot surgeon can indeed adjust to the subtle movement and deformation of soft tissue to execute precise and consistent suturing. The research, which appears in the journal Science Translational Medicine promises to improve results for patients and make the best surgical techniques more widely available.

Johns Hopkins Faculty Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Four Johns Hopkins University faculty members are among the new scholars elected to the National Academy of Sciences today in recognition of their “distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.”

Johns Hopkins Professor Awarded “Early Career” Honor

Rebecca Schulman, an assistant professor in Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering, is among 49 young scientists across the country to receive grants from the U.S. Energy Department’s Office of Science under the agency’s Early Career Research Program.

Student Engineers to Present Projects in Johns Hopkins-City Program

Graffiti scrawlers in Highlandtown, beware: a team of third- and fourth-graders is building a drone to catch you in the act, and also clean the building.

Johns Hopkins Researchers Aim for Safer, More Efficient Rocket Engines

The U.S. Air Force has awarded two contracts totaling $1.48 million to the Energetics Research Group, based within Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering, to help set the stage for the next generation of U.S.-made rocket engines. The funding will be used to reduce risks associated with new technologies that may replace the Russian-made RD-180 engine.

Johns Hopkins Joins Effort to Teach Math, Science Through Music

Music can make you want to dance, sing and clap your hands, but can it also make you want to learn math? A Johns Hopkins University professor of applied mathematics hopes so.

Johns Hopkins Film Incubator Aims to Empower New Baltimore Voices

Aspiring visual artists in Baltimore will have access to the expertise and connections of top filmmakers and executives through a new program launching at Johns Hopkins University.

Mapping City Hotspots for Zika Mosquito, ‘Never Will Bite’ Soap Among Winning Ideas at Johns Hopkins Hackathon

Mapping a city to detect Zika mosquito hotspots. Fashion accessories infused with a long-acting mosquito repellant. A special soap that keeps mosquitos away. Those are among the winning ideas from a Johns Hopkins University hackathon that drew participants from Baltimore to Brazil looking for ways to help prevent the spread of the Zika virus.

Tax Prep Chains Target Low-Income Workers

National tax preparation chains continue to exploit the working poor, many of whom spend a significant portion of a key federal anti-poverty tax credit just to pay for filing their taxes, a new study concludes.

Johns Hopkins Physics Fair Returns to Homewood Campus

Scientists will reveal invisible forces in the universe, students will compete for prizes and balloon rockets will be launched as the Johns Hopkins University’s Department of Physics and Astronomy holds its 13th Annual Physics Fair on Saturday, April 16 on the Homewood campus, 3400 N. Charles St. in Baltimore.

$10 Million Gift Establishes Institute for the Humanities

Philanthropist Elizabeth Grass Weese and her brother, Roger Grass have committed $10 million to advance humanities scholarship and teaching at the Johns Hopkins University and to promote literature, art, philosophy, history and other cultural studies in Baltimore and the wider community. The gift is the largest ever to Johns Hopkins exclusively for the support of the humanities.

Johns Hopkins Art Historian Awarded Guggenheim Fellowship

Mitchell B. Merback, a Johns Hopkins University art historian, is among 178 prominent scholars to win 2016 Fellowships from The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Do Health Awareness Days Actually Impact Behavior?

Health awareness days are ubiquitous. But does dedicating a day to a serious disease or to healthy living habits actually make a difference in the lives of people who hear about the occasion?A new study, published today in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance by researchers from Johns Hopkins University and other institutions, used modern Big Data analyses to confirm that at least one annual health awareness day does indeed trigger behavior among many of the people who hear about it.

Race Biases Teachers’ Expectations for Students

When evaluating the same black student, white teachers expect significantly less academic success than black teachers, a new Johns Hopkins University study concludes. This is especially true for black boys.

Baltimore Series to Explore Roots and Realities of Discrimination

A year after the unrest in Baltimore sparked by the arrest and tragic death of Freddie Gray, Johns Hopkins University is launching an art and conversation series to reflect on deep-rooted discrimination in the city and what the community can do about it.

New Research Shows Quasars Slowed Star Formation

Research led by Johns Hopkins University scientists has found new persuasive evidence that could help solve a long-standing mystery in astrophysics: why did the pace of star formation in the universe slow down some 11 billion years ago?

Computer Simulations May Help Golfers Tame the Sport’s ‘Scariest 155 Yards’

Johns Hopkins engineers have devised a computer model to unravel the wicked wind conditions that plague the world’s greatest golfers at a course that hosts one of the sport’s most storied tournaments, The Masters, in Augusta, Ga.

Johns Hopkins Graduate Programs Rank Among U.S. News Best

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in nursing, education, medicine, and biomedical engineering remain among the best in the nation, according to the newest U.S. News & World Report rankings of “Best Graduate Schools.”

Evidence of a ‘Ferguson Effect’ on Baltimore Arrests Before Unrest

A “Ferguson effect” likely decelerated arrests in Baltimore well before the April 2015 unrest related to the arrest and death of Freddie Gray, but there is little evidence to suggest it influenced the city’s crime rate, a new report concludes.

Cartoonist Ben Katchor to Speak at Johns Hopkins

Award-winning cartoonist and graphic novelist Ben Katchor will present an illustrated lecture on his work Monday April 4 at Johns Hopkins University.