About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Eclipse Party

August 17, 2017 CONTACT: Jill Rosen Office: 443-997-9906 Cell: 443-547-8805 jrosen@jhu.edu @JHUmediareps WHAT: Solar eclipse watch party WHERE: The Beach at Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus, 3400 N. Charles St. The “beach” is the grassy area in front of the Milton S. Eisenhower Library. WHEN: From 1:30 to 3:30 p.m., Monday Aug. 21 Details: University […]

Advisory: JHU Experts Can Discuss Race, Political movements, Inequality

The following Johns Hopkins University experts — political scientists, economists, historians and sociologists — are available for interviews on topics of race, inequality and political movements:

MEDIA ADVISORY: How a ‘rock-paper-scissors’ game led to Charlottesville

Johns Hopkins historian N.D.B. Connolly says last weekend’s white nationalist demonstration in Charlottesville, Virginia, has made it clear that “generic solutions” to this county’s racial problem do not work. For too long, he says, discrimination and equality in the United States have operated “like an oversized historical game of paper-rock-scissors.”

Mapping the Brain, Neuron by Neuron

Johns Hopkins University experts are part of an international team of scientists that has taken another step toward mapping how brains work.

MacKenzie Named Dean of Public Health

Ellen J. MacKenzie, an expert on improving trauma care systems and policy and a nationally renowned researcher, veteran academic leader, and Johns Hopkins faculty member since 1979, will be the 11th dean of the university’s Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Teachers to Get Deep Dive Into Research on Learning

Though learning is their stock and trade, educators are often removed from research on how people learn. To address this, Johns Hopkins University’s Science of Learning Institute has invited 150 teachers and administrators from around the world to Baltimore for a day to meet scientists doing cutting-edge research on the brain and learning.

Pilot Program Will Test Novel Approach to Teaching Science

Though scientists know children with strong spatial thinking skills have an edge in science, technology, engineering and math, and that those skills are teachable, no one has formally infused them into a working elementary curriculum. With a $1.4 million federal grant, Johns Hopkins University researchers will co-develop and test such a program for third-grade science classes.

Method Determines Cell Age More Accurately, Could Help Elderly Patients

Led by scientists at Johns Hopkins University, a team of researchers is reporting progress in developing a method to accurately determine the functional age of cells, a step that could eventually help clinicians evaluate and recommend ways to delay some health effects of aging and potentially improve other treatments, including skin graft matching and predicting prospects for wound healing.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Develop Super-strong Metal for Next Tech Frontier

The technological future of everything from cars and jet engines to oil rigs, along with the gadgets, appliances and public utilities comprising the Internet of Things will depend on microscopic sensors.

Trouble is these sensors are mostly made of the material silicon, which has its limits. Johns Hopkins University materials scientist and mechanical engineer Kevin J. Hemker has led a team that is now reporting success in developing a new material that promises to help ensure that these sensors, also known as microelectromechanical systems [MEMS], can continue to meet the demands of the next technological frontier.

Johns Hopkins Launches Effort to Improve Civic Engagement

The Stavros Niarchos Foundation has committed $150 million to Johns Hopkins University to forge new ways to address the deterioration of civic engagement worldwide.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Lights Out! Weak Networks Put Power Grids at Risk

The startling vulnerability of the world’s power grid systems does not surprise Yair Amir, a professor and chair of the Department of Computer Science in the Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Researchers to Present Their Work on Capitol Hill

Early career scientists, physicians, engineers and specialists in public health, nursing, music and marketing from Johns Hopkins University will gather on Capitol Hill in Washington to present their federally-funded research, emphasizing the importance of continuing federal support in the pursuit of new knowledge and innovation.

Can You Hear Me Now?

When trying to be heard over noise, humans and animals raise their voices. It’s a split-second feat, from ear to brain to vocalization, and Johns Hopkins University researchers are the first to measure just how fast it happens in bats: 30 milliseconds. That’s 10 times faster than the blink of an eye, a record for audio-vocal response.

New Cellular Target May Put the Brakes on Cancer’s Ability to Spread

A team led by Johns Hopkins researchers has discovered a biochemical signaling process that causes densely packed cancer cells to break away from a tumor and spread the disease elsewhere in the body.

MEDIA ADVISORY: JHU to Host Panel Discussion on Economic Inclusion and the Private Sector

Leading national and local voices on economic inclusion will gather at Johns Hopkins University to discuss the role of the private sector in expanding opportunity, including specific policies and strategies that have been implemented in Baltimore and elsewhere

Media Advisory: Robots Play Soccer, Catch and Chess at Johns Hopkins

The Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering is staging a demonstration by students who have programmed robots and drones to perform an array of tasks, including playing chess with a real chess board and passing around a soccer ball.

Study: Black and White Kids Faring Equally in Subsidized Housing

Once-formidable disparities between black and white families living in subsidized housing have largely vanished, and black and white children who grew up in such housing fared similarly in school, jobs and earnings, finds a new Johns Hopkins University study. However, one troubling difference remains between black and white families in assisted housing — neighborhood quality. Black families getting subsidized housing are about nine time more likely than whites to live in segregated, impoverished neighborhoods, the study found.

Whose Line is it Anyway? New Hopkins Class Teaches Engineers to Think on Their Feet

Offered for the first time this semester, “Improvisation for Scientists and Engineers” uses lessons borrowed from theater classes to help such students hone their off-the-cuff verbal skills and develop poise in front of groups – valued skills in the professional world.

Students Engineer Solutions for Baltimore Problems

See how Baltimore students would use science to help their neighborhoods – the capstone to a five-year pilot program for science, technology, engineering and math education

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Physics Fair Returns to Homewood Campus

The Johns Hopkins University’s Department of Physics and Astronomy is hosting its 14th Annual Physics Fair. The day will include more than 200 physics demonstrations.

Johns Hopkins Engineering Students Customize Stroller for Syrian Child with Special Needs

In an effort to enhance his quality of life, undergraduate engineering students from Johns Hopkins University have customized a stroller for a local child with special needs, adding improvements that will make mobility simpler and safer for him and his family.

Media Advisory: Astronaut Kate Rubins to Speak at Johns Hopkins University

Kate Rubins, the first person to sequence DNA in space aboard the International Space Station last year, will talk about her work as a scientist and astronaut.

With Just One Black Teacher, Black Students More Likely to Graduate

Low-income black students who have at least one black teacher in elementary school are significantly more likely to graduate high school and consider attending college, concludes a new study co-authored by a Johns Hopkins University economist.

Christopher Morphew Named Dean of Education

Christopher C. Morphew, an experienced academic leader and prominent scholar at the University of Iowa College of Education, has been appointed dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Education.