About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Black Students Who Have One Black Teacher More Likely to Go to College

Having one black teacher in elementary school not only makes children more likely to graduate high school, it makes them significantly more likely to enroll in college.

High Water Bills Can Unintentionally Harm Disadvantaged Tenants

Landlords in disadvantaged communities are so unsettled by increasing water bills and nuisance fees they are taking it out their tenants, threatening the housing security of those who need it most, a new Johns Hopkins University study concludes.

Baltimore Students to Take ‘Wakanda Challenge’ at Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Event

At the annual meeting of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, the nation’s largest gathering of black elected officials, about 100 students from Baltimore City’s Dunbar High School will participate in an event called the STEAM Revolt Youth Workshop: Wakanda Design Challenge. In this interactive contest, students, who are part of Dunbar’s P-TECH college prep program, will create a new Avengers superhero with ties to African culture.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available

Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available.

JHU Project Aims to Save Millions by Reducing Solar Power Forecast Errors

Although the popularity of solar energy has surged, the unpredictability of a weather-dependent technology has kept even more people from embracing it. A new Johns Hopkins University-led project hopes to change that by improving our ability to forecast sunshine and backup power needs.

How Recent Economy Kept Black, White Young Adults From Leaving Nest

The economically tumultuous last decade convinced many young people to keep living with their parents, but the reasons why differ starkly by race, concludes a new Johns Hopkins University-led study.

Johns Hopkins Teams with Lockheed Martin to Enhance STEM Programming for PreK-12th Grade Students

The Johns Hopkins University and Lockheed Martin today announced a partnership aimed at enhancing opportunities for Baltimore City public school students pursuing academic and career fields in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). The collaboration is designed to close the STEM gap that exists primarily in Pre-K through 12th grade.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Conference to Explore Race, Segregation and Inequality

Race & Inequality in America: The Kerner Commission at 50. A conference featuring dozens of scholars and experts exploring race, segregation, and inequality 50 years after the release of the historic Kerner Commission Report.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Leaders to Address Issues Facing Cities

Leaders representing about 45 U.S. cities and urban scholars will convene to discuss new research on critical issues for metro areas during the 21st Century Neighborhoods: Research. Leadership. Transformation symposium, sponsored by Johns Hopkins University’s 21st Century Cities Initiative.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Experts Can Discuss Fed Chair Options

Janet Yellen’s term as chair of the Federal Reserve is slated to end in February 2018. Speculation is underway about who President Donald Trump might choose to be her successor in the highly influential role leading the central bank of the United States.

Johns Hopkins University has several experts available, all with extensive media commentating experience, to discuss this and any news related to The Fed.

MEDIA ADVISORY: City Leaders to Discuss How to Finance Baltimore’s Growth

Public, private, academic, and nonprofit leaders from Baltimore and elsewhere in Maryland will gather to discuss strategies for strengthening Baltimore’s financing system for small companies, following a new report from Johns Hopkins University’s 21st Century Cities Initiative.

Follow the Money: How Does Baltimore Support Small Business Growth?

Baltimore, a city with clear economic assets and competitive advantages, should have a more robust financing system to cultivate a range of startups and small businesses, concludes a new report by Johns Hopkins University’s 21st Century Cities Initiative.

MEDIA ADVISORY: More Hurricane Harvey Experts from Johns Hopkins University

This is a third list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on issues associated with the onslaught and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

MEDIA ADVISORY: More Hurricane Harvey Experts from Johns Hopkins University

This is a second list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on issues associated with the onslaught and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Hurricane Experts from Johns Hopkins University

A list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on various issues associated with the formation, onslaught and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. This list will be updated as warranted.

Study: Black and White Kids Faring Equally in Subsidized Housing

Once-formidable disparities between black and white families living in subsidized housing have largely vanished, and black and white children who grew up in such housing fared similarly in school, jobs and earnings, finds a new Johns Hopkins University study. However, one troubling difference remains between black and white families in assisted housing — neighborhood quality. Black families getting subsidized housing are about nine time more likely than whites to live in segregated, impoverished neighborhoods, the study found.

With Just One Black Teacher, Black Students More Likely to Graduate

Low-income black students who have at least one black teacher in elementary school are significantly more likely to graduate high school and consider attending college, concludes a new study co-authored by a Johns Hopkins University economist.

When Women’s Health Improves, Domestic Violence Diminishes

Chronically ill, low-income women who thought they were dying, experienced a sharp reduction in domestic violence after getting access to a life-saving treatment, a Johns Hopkins University-led study found.

Teens in Poorest Families Go Hungry More Than Younger Kids

In very poor families, teenagers are going hungry twice as often as their younger siblings, a new Johns Hopkins University study finds.

Subsidized Housing Works Better for Some Kids Than Others

Living in subsidized housing seems to give a boost to children with high standardized test scores and few behavior problems, but it has the opposite effect on students who score poorly and have behavioral issues, a new study finds.

For-Profit Trade Schools Prove Costly for Disadvantaged Black Youth

Young African-Americans from some of the country’s most disadvantaged neighborhoods are drawn to for-profit post-secondary trade schools, believing they are the quickest route to jobs. But a new study co-authored by a Johns Hopkins University sociologist finds the very thing that makes for-profit schools seem so appealing — a streamlined curriculum — is the reason so many poor students drop out.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Experts Available to Discuss Election Topics

The following Johns Hopkins University experts, whose research focuses on such subjects as race, economic policy, inequality, gun violence, law enforcement and health care, are available for interviews during the presidential election season.

Sunil Kumar Named Johns Hopkins Provost

Sunil Kumar, dean of the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and a widely published expert on operations management and research, has been appointed the 15th provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at the Johns Hopkins University.

Johns Hopkins Launches New Online Master’s Degree in Financial Mathematics

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals, the division of Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering that administers online and part-time graduate programs, has launched a new financial mathematics master’s degree program that can be completed online.

Tax Prep Chains Target Low-Income Workers

National tax preparation chains continue to exploit the working poor, many of whom spend a significant portion of a key federal anti-poverty tax credit just to pay for filing their taxes, a new study concludes.