About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Sunil Kumar Named Johns Hopkins Provost

Sunil Kumar, dean of the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and a widely published expert on operations management and research, has been appointed the 15th provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at the Johns Hopkins University.

Johns Hopkins Launches New Online Master’s Degree in Financial Mathematics

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals, the division of Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering that administers online and part-time graduate programs, has launched a new financial mathematics master’s degree program that can be completed online.

Tax Prep Chains Target Low-Income Workers

National tax preparation chains continue to exploit the working poor, many of whom spend a significant portion of a key federal anti-poverty tax credit just to pay for filing their taxes, a new study concludes.

Why Some People Would Pay for a Drug They Probably Won’t Ever Need

A sick person is obviously willing to pay for a good medical treatment, but a Johns Hopkins University economist and his collaborators finds healthy people are potentially a much broader, if largely overlooked, market for medical innovations.

If You Made Money Buying a 1st Home in the 2000s, You Probably Weren’t Black

In a study recently published in the journal Real Estate Economics, public policy professor Sandra J. Newman and researcher C. Scott Holupka found that race was a key determinate of which low and moderate-income people who bought first homes during the decade made money. During the Great Recession, white homebuyers lost money but black ones lost considerably more. Even during the boom years, when white buyers increased their wealth by 50 percent, black buyers lost 47 percent of their wealth.

Johns Hopkins and DuPont Join Forces to Produce an Improved Ebola Protection Suit

The Johns Hopkins University and DuPont have signed license and collaboration agreements allowing DuPont to commercialize a garment with innovative features from Johns Hopkins to help protect people on the front lines of the Ebola crisis and future deadly infectious disease outbreaks. DuPont intends to have the first of these garments available in the marketplace during the first half of 2016.

Johns Hopkins Joins National Sustainable Nanotechnology Project

Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University have joined a national effort to produce environmentally friendly materials built at the atomic and molecular scale.The environmental impact of materials used in emerging areas of nanotechnology – used, for instance, in video screens, solar cells and electric car batteries – is largely unknown, but scientists working across the country under a new federal grant hope to learn how these products affect the natural world before their commercial use expands.

Advisory: Johns Hopkins Business Experts Available to Discuss Hurricane Katrina

To assist journalists covering the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School experts are available to comment on issues related to risk management, preparedness, community development, infrastructure, health, finance and related issues.

Cyber Security Experts to Discuss Tricky Balance Between Data Sharing and Privacy

In its efforts to curb criminal activity, should the government be allowed to see confidential consumer data collected by businesses? Or does the right to privacy trump such intrusions? These complex questions will be the focus of the second annual Senior Executive Cyber Security Conference, to be held Thursday, Sept. 10, at Johns Hopkins University. Registration for the daylong event is under way.

Love and Money: How Low-Income Dads Really Provide

Low-income fathers who might be labeled “deadbeat dads” often spend as much on their children as parents in formal child support arrangements, but they choose to give goods like food and clothing rather than cash, a Johns Hopkins-led study found.

Critics of American Tax Scofflaws ‘Hypocritical’

Although critics knock United States-based companies like Apple, Google and Starbucks for dodging taxes overseas, a new analysis shows that European companies in the states are enjoying the same sort of tax breaks.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Teams of Student Entrepreneurs to Face Judges for $81,000 in Johns Hopkins Business Plan Funding on Friday, May 1

The nationally recognized Johns Hopkins University Business Plan Competition, hosted on Friday, May 1, by the Center for Leadership Education, will feature student teams from various divisions of Johns Hopkins University, as well as students representing The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Yale School of Management, and Tulane University. The teams will compete in one of four categories, for a portion of $81,000 in funding to be announced at a dinner that night.

How A Little Inflation Could Lead to a Lot More Jobs

With the unemployment rate inching lower and lower, policymakers predict recovery from the recession is imminent. But the Federal Reserve could help create even more jobs by keeping interest rates near zero and tolerating a little inflation, a Johns Hopkins University economist argues.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Super Bowl Commercial Expert Available

A Johns Hopkins University researcher who has studied what makes a Super Bowl commercial successful is available to discuss, analyze and rate the 2015 ads.

O’Malley to Join Johns Hopkins as Visiting Professor

Outgoing Maryland governor Martin O’Malley will join the Johns Hopkins University’s Carey Business School Feb. 2 as a visiting professor focusing on government, business and urban issues.

Johns Hopkins to Co-Host Cyber Security Conference for Top Business Executives

At a time when data theft at retailers and other businesses is occurring far too frequently, Johns Hopkins information security experts have helped organize an upcoming conference to inform top executives about the growing risks of digital break-ins, how to reduce these risks, and how to manage the aftermath of a data breach. The conference is scheduled for Oct. 31 and Nov. 1 at the university’s Homewood campus in Baltimore. More than a dozen speakers, representing the business community, academia and government offices, are slated to participate.

Johns Hopkins Appoints Three to Bloomberg Distinguished Professorship Positions

The new appointees are Patricia H. Janak, a neuroscientist specializing in associative learning and addiction; Stephen Morgan, a sociologist with expertise in education and inequality; and Kathleen Sutcliffe, an organizational sociologist focused on organizational reliability and safety. Janak, Morgan, and Sutcliffe will begin their new roles on July 1.

U.S. Welfare Spending Up — But Help for the Neediest Down

Although the United States is spending more on welfare than ever before, most of that money is going to better-off families rather than the very poorest. That means in 2014, a family of four earning $11,925 a year likely got less aid than a same-sized family earning $47,700.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Student Teams to Compete for Johns Hopkins Business Plan Prize Money on Friday, April 25

The nationally recognized Johns Hopkins University Business Plan Competition, hosted by the Center for Leadership Education, encourages students to take a novel idea or innovative technology and develop a business plan around it. Student presentations and judging will take place from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, April 25, in Hodson Hall on the university’s Homewood campus.

Johns Hopkins Finds With Super Bowl Commercials, Storytelling Beats Sex

They say sex sells, but when it comes to Super Bowl commercials, a Johns Hopkins researcher begs to differ. It’s all about the storytelling, found Keith A. Quesenberry, a lecturer in the university’s Center for Leadership Education.

Aid Programs Helped U.S. Survive the Great Recession

The report, published this month in The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, shows the country’s “social safety net” expanded to catch many Americans during the economic downturn, which lasted roughly from 2008 through 2009.

Wyskiel to Head JHU Tech Commercialization, Corporate Relations

Christy Wyskiel, an entrepreneur and investor who has started, supported and analyzed businesses in health care and the life sciences for nearly 20 years, has been appointed senior advisor to the president for enterprise development at The Johns Hopkins University.

Hopkins Engineering, Campbell & Co. Create Partnership for Teaching, Internships

In a move that will give financial mathematics students increased exposure to strategic internships and to experts working in today’s ultra-competitive financial services field, The Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering has entered into a partnership with Baltimore-based Campbell & Company, one of the oldest and largest investment management firms in the world.

Johns Hopkins Carey Business School professor earns inaugural Emerging Scholar Award

Adam Seth Litwin, an assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School, has been selected an inaugural winner of the Emerging Scholar Award in Employee Participation and Ownership. The newly introduced $1,500 award is presented by the Academy of Management, the oldest and largest scholarly management association in the world.

New Campus Accelerator Aims to Turn High-Tech Ideas into Businesses

The Johns Hopkins University is set to unveil FastForward, a groundbreaking business accelerator that promises to spark cutting-edge technology companies and then keep them in the city to bolster the local economy. The university’s Whiting School of Engineering launched FastForward to help turn the best ideas born on campus into moneymaking ventures. The university’s first accelerator is located in the historic Stieff Silver building on the north side of Baltimore near the Homewood campus.