About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

ADVISORY: At JHU This Weekend, Students to Hack to Improve City Life

More than 300 graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University for the latest 36-hour HopHacks, a marathon session challenging students to come up with software and hardware ideas.

JHU Project Aims to Save Millions by Reducing Solar Power Forecast Errors

Although the popularity of solar energy has surged, the unpredictability of a weather-dependent technology has kept even more people from embracing it. A new Johns Hopkins University-led project hopes to change that by improving our ability to forecast sunshine and backup power needs.

Szalay to lead what could become world’s largest scientific data storage network

Johns Hopkins University’s Alex Szalay will lead a two-year national effort to begin building a network allowing scientists to more efficiently store and analyze huge caches of data and share them with other researchers.

Science and Health News Tips from Johns Hopkins

News tips for reporters from stories in the spring 2018 issue of Johns Hopkins Magazine.

New Computational Strategy Designed for More Personalized Cancer Treatment

Mathematicians and cancer scientists have found a way to simplify complex biomolecular data about tumors, in principle making it easier to prescribe the appropriate treatment for a specific patient.

Smartphone ‘Scores’ Can Help Doctors Track Severity of Parkinson’s Disease Symptoms

Parkinson’s disease, a progressive brain disorder, is often tough to treat effectively because symptoms, such as tremors and walking difficulties, can vary dramatically over a period of days, or even hours. To address this challenge, Johns Hopkins University computer scientists, working with an interdisciplinary team of experts from two other institutions, have developed a new approach that uses sensors on a smartphone to generate a score that reliably reflects symptom severity in patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Hacker-Resistant Power Plant Software Gets a Glowing Tryout in Hawaii

Johns Hopkins computer security experts recently traveled to Hawaii to see how well their hacker-resistant software would operate within a working but currently offline Honolulu power plant. The successful resilience testing, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, was triggered in part by growing concerns about the vulnerability of electric power grids after two high-profile cyber-attacks turned out the lights in parts of Ukraine during the past two years.

Hundreds of College Students to Convene at JHU for Marathon Weekend Hackathon

Graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University this weekend for the latest HopHacks, a marathon session. The event challenges students to realize their best software and hardware ideas and compete for cash and other sponsored prizes.

Can a Cockroach Teach a Robot How to Scurry Across Rugged Terrain?

When they turn up in family pantries or restaurant kitchens, cockroaches are commonly despised as ugly, unhealthy pests and are quickly killed. But in the name of science, Johns Hopkins researchers have put these unwanted bugs to work.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Super Bowl Marks the Season’s End, But Concussion Concerns Continue

During this year’s Super Bowl, K.T. Ramesh, a biomechanics expert at Johns Hopkins University, will pay more attention to the collateral damage that can occur during football games: head injuries. He is developing a technological tool to help better diagnose concussions and predict where related brain damage has likely occurred.

New Computer Model Sheds Light on Biological Events Leading to Sudden Cardiac Death

Some heart disease patients face a higher risk of sudden cardiac death, which can happen when an arrhythmia—an irregular heartbeat—disrupts the normal electrical activity in the heart and causes the organ to stop pumping. However, arrhythmias linked to sudden cardiac death are very rare, making it difficult to study how they occur—and how they might be prevented. To make it much easier to discover what triggers this deadly disorder, a team led by Johns Hopkins researchers constructed a powerful new computer model that replicates the biological activity within the heart that precedes sudden cardiac death.

Johns Hopkins-led Team Aims to Turn Computer Systems into Digital Detectives

Imagine an embassy bombing. Consider the massive amount and varied types of data that investigators would need to review to determine who carried out the attack and how it was done. Such a probe could involve the slow, painstaking examinations of video footage, photos, internet communications, telephone records and other material. A Johns Hopkins University-led international team of scientists, supported by an $11-million, five-year U.S. Department of Defense grant, wants to streamline such investigations by developing algorithms for extracting the most useful information from multi-modal data.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Don’t Let These Creepy Skeletons Get Under Your Skin

On Halloween night, from their haunted hiding places beneath Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus, scary skeletons will come to life in the dark depths of Hackerman Hall—and begin to dance!

Media Advisory: Is Your Personal Data Safe from a ‘Krack Attack’?

Two widely respected Johns Hopkins University scholars are available to talk to members of the news media about how serious the Wi-Fi flaw is, which equipment is most at risk and how users can protect themselves.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Help Show Links Between Genes, Body Tissues

Johns Hopkins University scientists are part of a research team assessing how a person’s genetic profile affects his body. The results could help show how individual genetic differences contribute to disease and guide treatments for heritable disorders such as Alzheimer’s, high cholesterol or Type I diabetes.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Win Grant for Machine Language Translation

A team of computer scientists at Johns Hopkins University has won a $10.7 million grant from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence to create an information retrieval and translation system for languages that are not widely used around the world.

Media Advisory: Cyber Security Conference at Johns Hopkins University Features Experts from Academia, Industry, Retired General’s Keynote on Threats

The 4th Annual Cyber Security Conference for Executives, co-sponsored by Johns Hopkins University and Compass Cyber Security, presents a forum for experts from academia, private business, and government to share their knowledge and experience.

Media Advisory: Hundreds of College Students to Gather at Johns Hopkins for Weekend of HopHacks

More than 300 graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University for the latest HopHacks, a marathon session challenging students to realize their best software and hardware ideas and compete for cash and other sponsored prizes.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Lights Out! Weak Networks Put Power Grids at Risk

The startling vulnerability of the world’s power grid systems does not surprise Yair Amir, a professor and chair of the Department of Computer Science in the Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Researchers to Present Their Work on Capitol Hill

Early career scientists, physicians, engineers and specialists in public health, nursing, music and marketing from Johns Hopkins University will gather on Capitol Hill in Washington to present their federally-funded research, emphasizing the importance of continuing federal support in the pursuit of new knowledge and innovation.

Nine Johns Hopkins Engineers Named AIMBE Fellows

Nine faculty members from The Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering have been named Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

Voice Technology Education at Johns Hopkins Gets a Boost from Amazon

At a time when more home, office and vehicle devices respond to vocal commands, Amazon has selected Johns Hopkins University among the first four schools to receive support from the Alexa Fund Fellowship, a new program designed to encourage advances in voice communication between people and machines.

New Gene Sequencing Software Could Aid in Early Detection, Treatment of Cancer

A research team from the United States and Canada has developed and successfully tested new computational software that determines whether a human DNA sample includes an epigenetic add-on linked to cancer and other adverse health conditions.

Media Advisory: Hundreds of College Students to Convene at JHU for Weekend of HopHacks

Graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University for the latest HopHacks, a marathon session challenging students to realize their best software and hardware ideas and compete for cash and other sponsored prizes.

MEDIA ADVISORY: What Happens When Hackers Hijack Our Smart Devices?

In a recent segment on NPR’s TED Radio Hour, Johns Hopkins cybersecurity expert Avi Rubin warned that our increasing reliance on Internet-connected add-ons to our home appliances and vehicles could yield unwelcome consequences.