About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

For-Profit Trade Schools Prove Costly for Disadvantaged Black Youth

Young African-Americans from some of the country’s most disadvantaged neighborhoods are drawn to for-profit post-secondary trade schools, believing they are the quickest route to jobs. But a new study co-authored by a Johns Hopkins University sociologist finds the very thing that makes for-profit schools seem so appealing — a streamlined curriculum — is the reason so many poor students drop out.

ADVISORY: Future Engineers Use Their Noodles to Build Spaghetti Bridges

About 160 high school students at the Johns Hopkins Baltimore campus — and another 425 students across the country — will compete in the annual Spaghetti Bridge Contest, marking the culmination of a four-week summer course called Engineering Innovation.

A Simple Numbers Game Seems to Make Kids Better at Math

Although math skills are considered notoriously hard to improve, Johns Hopkins University researchers boosted kindergarteners’ arithmetic performance simply by exercising their intuitive number sense with a quick computer game.

19 Awarded Fulbrights at Johns Hopkins

A record number of Johns Hopkins University students and recent graduates – 19 – have been named Fulbright Scholars, earning the opportunity to travel abroad to such places as Peru, Malaysia and Spain to study, teach and conduct research.

Student Engineers to Present Projects in Johns Hopkins-City Program

Graffiti scrawlers in Highlandtown, beware: a team of third- and fourth-graders is building a drone to catch you in the act, and also clean the building.

Race Biases Teachers’ Expectations for Students

When evaluating the same black student, white teachers expect significantly less academic success than black teachers, a new Johns Hopkins University study concludes. This is especially true for black boys.

Johns Hopkins Graduate Programs Rank Among U.S. News Best

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in nursing, education, medicine, and biomedical engineering remain among the best in the nation, according to the newest U.S. News & World Report rankings of “Best Graduate Schools.”

Johns Hopkins Researchers’ Career-Long Study Wins Top Education Prize

Three Johns Hopkins University researchers whose 2014 book traced the lives of nearly 800 Baltimore City public school students for a quarter of a century have won the prestigious $100,000 Grawemeyer Award in Education.

Baltimore Welcomes 1st Pre-K-8th Engineering-Oriented School

The Johns Hopkins University and Baltimore City Schools have partnered to create the city’s first pre-K-8th grade school dedicated to giving students a foundation in engineering and computer skills.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Baltimore to Welcome 1st Engineering-Oriented School

The Johns Hopkins University and Baltimore City Schools have partnered to create the city’s first pre-K-8th grade school dedicated to giving students a foundation in engineering and computer skills.

JHU Policy Institute to Discuss Maryland Statewide Test Results

The Johns Hopkins University School of Education and area educators will hold a forum next month to discuss Baltimore and Maryland results on the new Partnership for Assessments for College and Careers (PARCC) high school assessment test.

Johns Hopkins Researcher Contributes to White House Initiative on School Absenteeism

The Obama administration is enlisting help from the Johns Hopkins University in a just-announced initiative to reduce chronic absenteeism in public schools by at least 10 percent a year.

Neighbors But Not Classmates

Contrary to assumptions that disadvantaged neighborhoods trap children in failing schools, a Johns Hopkins University sociologist has found the opposite to be true: as a neighborhood’s income decreases, its range of educational experiences greatly expands.

Johns Hopkins To Launch Education Policy Institute

The Johns Hopkins University School of Education, the nation’s number one ranked graduate school of education, will open a policy institute this summer to translate rigorous research into a prominent force for change, to initiate research projects and to analyze important issues in public forums.

Johns Hopkins Physics Fair Returns to Homewood Campus

The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University will host its 12th annual Physics Fair from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 25. The fair coincides with the university’s annual Spring Fair celebration on the Homewood campus.

Media Advisory: Student Teams to Compete for State Championship at Maryland Science Olympiad at Johns Hopkins

On Saturday, April 11, about 600 Maryland middle school and high school students and teachers will attend an all-day competition on the Homewood campus to determine the winners of the 2015 Maryland Science Olympiad and the qualifiers for National Science Olympiad.

Johns Hopkins Graduate Programs Rated among the Best by U.S. News

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in education, medicine, public health and nursing and in individual disciplines such as biomedical engineering remain among the best in the nation, according to the newest U.S. News & World Report’s report on “Best Graduate Schools.”

Weekend Media Advisory: 47 Baltimore City School Teams to Compete Saturday in Robotics Contest at Johns Hopkins

On Saturday, Feb. 14, more than 150 middle and high school students from Baltimore City Public Schools will compete at Johns Hopkins in the Textron Systems Hopkins Robotics Cup, an event that yields the winners of the Baltimore City Mentor League VEX Robotics Championship.

Media Advisory: 34 Baltimore City School Teams to Compete Saturday, April 5, in Robotics Contest at Johns Hopkins

On Saturday, April 5, in the Newton White Athletic Center on The Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus, more than 100 middle and high school students from Baltimore City Public Schools will compete in the Hopkins Robotics Cup, the Baltimore City VEX Robotics Championship competition. The event is being hosted by the Center for Educational Outreach at Johns Hopkins’ Whiting School of Engineering, in partnership with Baltimore City Public Schools. The Center’s mission is to increase the number of youth who pursue science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education and careers, particularly women and underrepresented minorities.

MEDIA ADVISORY: State Finals for Maryland Science Olympiad to Be Held Saturday, March 29, at Johns Hopkins’ Homewood Campus

More than 750 Maryland middle and high school students are expected to participate in the Maryland Science Olympiad state finals. The event is being hosted by the Center for Educational Outreach at Johns Hopkins’ Whiting School of Engineering, in partnership with Maryland Science Olympiad. The Center’s mission is to increase the number of youth who pursue science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education and careers, particularly women and underrepresented minorities.

Johns Hopkins Material Scientist Tim Mueller Receives NSF CAREER Award

Tim Mueller, a Johns Hopkins University assistant professor of materials science and engineering, has been selected by the National Science Foundation to receive its prestigious CAREER Award, which recognizes the highest level of excellence and promise in early-stage scholars. His faculty appointment is within the university’s Whiting School of Engineering.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Henderson-Hopkins School Ribbon Cutting

An opportunity for media to visit and tour Elmer A. Henderson: A Johns Hopkins Partnership School, the first new public school building in East Baltimore in more than 20 years.

New York City Finds Success in Cutting Chronic Absenteeism in School

Mentors, wake-up calls to students, incentives and weekly “student success” meetings led by principals, helped New York City significantly cut chronic absenteeism in schools, according to a new report by the Everyone Graduates Center at The Johns Hopkins University School of Education.

$1.6 Million in Rapid Renovations for Two City Schools

More than 750 public school students in Baltimore’s Charles Village return to classes this year in buildings that are safer, more functional, more attractive and better suited for learning, thanks to $1.6 million in summer upgrades, half paid for by Johns Hopkins.

Success for All Foundation Announces Partnership with Sesame Workshop to Pilot Sesame Street Content In Homes and Preschool Classrooms

The Home Links and preschool elements of the formative research and content testing effort will be piloted in schools and homes across the U.S. during the 2013-14 school year. The pilots will take place in Baltimore City and Prince George’s County, MD; New Orleans; Steubenville, OH; Bessemer, AL; and Corbin and Barbourville, KY.