About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Baltimore Students to Take ‘Wakanda Challenge’ at Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Event

At the annual meeting of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, the nation’s largest gathering of black elected officials, about 100 students from Baltimore City’s Dunbar High School will participate in an event called the STEAM Revolt Youth Workshop: Wakanda Design Challenge. In this interactive contest, students, who are part of Dunbar’s P-TECH college prep program, will create a new Avengers superhero with ties to African culture.

Urban Violence Can Hurt Test Scores Even for Kids Who Don’t Experience It

Children who attend school with many kids from violent neighborhoods show significantly lower test scores than peers with classmates from safer areas, according to a new Johns Hopkins University study.

Johns Hopkins Announces 2018 Fulbright Grant Winners

Sixteen Johns Hopkins University students and recent graduates have been awarded grants, earning the chance to travel abroad to study, teach and conduct research.

City Elementary/Middle Students to Show Off Their STEM Inventions

Students from nine Baltimore City elementary/middle schools will show off creations they conceived and built—some as part of classroom assignments, and others in response to challenges they encounter in their own communities.

Report: An ‘F’ Grade for the Nation’s Initial Three-Year Degree Programs

More schools are offering three-year degrees to counter the ever-skyrocketing costs of a college education but a new Johns Hopkins University analysis finds these new programs are failing students.

JHU and Lockheed Martin to Host Science and Engineering Expo at Baltimore City School

The Johns Hopkins University, Lockheed Martin and Barclay Elementary/Middle School will come together for an evening designed to showcase the science and engineering projects that students have been working on in the classroom all year.

Johns Hopkins Teams with Lockheed Martin to Enhance STEM Programming for PreK-12th Grade Students

The Johns Hopkins University and Lockheed Martin today announced a partnership aimed at enhancing opportunities for Baltimore City public school students pursuing academic and career fields in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). The collaboration is designed to close the STEM gap that exists primarily in Pre-K through 12th grade.

Johns Hopkins Grad Programs Rank Among Nation’s Best

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in biomedical engineering, nursing and medicine are once again among the country’s very best, according to the annual U.S. News & World Report ranking of the nation’s “Best Graduate Schools.”

MEDIA ADVISORY: JHU Expert Has New Paper on Risk of Arming Teachers

A Johns Hopkins University professor’s working paper that concludes that arming teachers would be risky and ineffective.

Baltimore Schools Adopt Science Program Built in Cooperation with Johns Hopkins

Baltimore City Public Schools in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University has adopted a program to strengthen science, technology, engineering and math instruction in the district’s elementary schools.

MEDIA ADVISORY: More Hurricane Harvey Experts from Johns Hopkins University

This is a third list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on issues associated with the onslaught and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

MEDIA ADVISORY: More Hurricane Harvey Experts from Johns Hopkins University

This is a second list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on issues associated with the onslaught and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Hurricane Experts from Johns Hopkins University

A list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on various issues associated with the formation, onslaught and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. This list will be updated as warranted.

Teachers to Get Deep Dive Into Research on Learning

Though learning is their stock and trade, educators are often removed from research on how people learn. To address this, Johns Hopkins University’s Science of Learning Institute has invited 150 teachers and administrators from around the world to Baltimore for a day to meet scientists doing cutting-edge research on the brain and learning.

Pilot Program Will Test Novel Approach to Teaching Science

Though scientists know children with strong spatial thinking skills have an edge in science, technology, engineering and math, and that those skills are teachable, no one has formally infused them into a working elementary curriculum. With a $1.4 million federal grant, Johns Hopkins University researchers will co-develop and test such a program for third-grade science classes.

Students Engineer Solutions for Baltimore Problems

See how Baltimore students would use science to help their neighborhoods – the capstone to a five-year pilot program for science, technology, engineering and math education

With Just One Black Teacher, Black Students More Likely to Graduate

Low-income black students who have at least one black teacher in elementary school are significantly more likely to graduate high school and consider attending college, concludes a new study co-authored by a Johns Hopkins University economist.

Christopher Morphew Named Dean of Education

Christopher C. Morphew, an experienced academic leader and prominent scholar at the University of Iowa College of Education, has been appointed dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Education.

52 Baltimore City School Teams to Compete in Robotics Contest at Johns Hopkins

On Saturday, Feb. 4, more than 200 middle and high school students from Baltimore City Public Schools will compete in the Hopkins Robotics Cup, the Baltimore City VEX and VEX IQ Robotics League championship event. This engineering challenge, which changes every year, is presented in the form of a game.

City 6th Graders to Debut Underwater Robot Claws Designed for Johns Hopkins

Johns Hopkins mechanical engineering professor Louis Whitcomb, who specializes in underwater robotics, has challenged 6th graders to design a robotic “claw” able to grab and retrieve submerged objects. On Thursday, students will present and demo their designs before the professor and Johns Hopkins undergraduates who spent two weeks helping them create the claws from corrugated cardboard, straws, string, brass fasteners, tape, paper clips and rubber bands.

Subsidized Housing Works Better for Some Kids Than Others

Living in subsidized housing seems to give a boost to children with high standardized test scores and few behavior problems, but it has the opposite effect on students who score poorly and have behavioral issues, a new study finds.

When Fish Come to School, Kids Get Hooked on Science

A program that brings live fish into classrooms to teach the fundamentals of biology not only helps students learn, but improves their attitudes about science, a new study finds.

For-Profit Trade Schools Prove Costly for Disadvantaged Black Youth

Young African-Americans from some of the country’s most disadvantaged neighborhoods are drawn to for-profit post-secondary trade schools, believing they are the quickest route to jobs. But a new study co-authored by a Johns Hopkins University sociologist finds the very thing that makes for-profit schools seem so appealing — a streamlined curriculum — is the reason so many poor students drop out.

ADVISORY: Future Engineers Use Their Noodles to Build Spaghetti Bridges

About 160 high school students at the Johns Hopkins Baltimore campus — and another 425 students across the country — will compete in the annual Spaghetti Bridge Contest, marking the culmination of a four-week summer course called Engineering Innovation.

A Simple Numbers Game Seems to Make Kids Better at Math

Although math skills are considered notoriously hard to improve, Johns Hopkins University researchers boosted kindergarteners’ arithmetic performance simply by exercising their intuitive number sense with a quick computer game.