About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

MEDIA ADVISORY: Mousetraps, Rubber Bands and Bowling Balls Will Provide Power in Student Contest

Forty-four Johns Hopkins freshmen from an introductory mechanical engineering course will compete. Teams of two or three students have each built devices that are designed to roll across the Shriver Hall stage and then launch a small projectile over a dozen rows of seats before landing in Row M.

Baltimore Welcomes 1st Pre-K-8th Engineering-Oriented School

The Johns Hopkins University and Baltimore City Schools have partnered to create the city’s first pre-K-8th grade school dedicated to giving students a foundation in engineering and computer skills.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Baltimore to Welcome 1st Engineering-Oriented School

The Johns Hopkins University and Baltimore City Schools have partnered to create the city’s first pre-K-8th grade school dedicated to giving students a foundation in engineering and computer skills.

Tiny Dancers: Can Ballet Bugs Help Us Build Better Robots?

When it’s time to design new robots, sometimes the best inspiration can come from Mother Nature. Take, for example, her creepy, but incredibly athletic spider crickets. Johns Hopkins engineering students and their professor have spent more than eight months unraveling the hopping skills, airborne antics and safe-landing patterns of these pesky insects that commonly lurk in the dark corners of damp basements.

Johns Hopkins and DuPont Join Forces to Produce an Improved Ebola Protection Suit

The Johns Hopkins University and DuPont have signed license and collaboration agreements allowing DuPont to commercialize a garment with innovative features from Johns Hopkins to help protect people on the front lines of the Ebola crisis and future deadly infectious disease outbreaks. DuPont intends to have the first of these garments available in the marketplace during the first half of 2016.

Johns Hopkins Medical Robotics Pioneer Russell H. Taylor to Receive 2015 Honda Prize

Russell H. Taylor, a Johns Hopkins professor who is widely hailed as the father of medical robotics, has been selected to receive the 2015 Honda Prize. The selection was announced Sept. 28 by the Honda Foundation, which initiated this honor in 1980 as Japan’s first international science and technology award.

Johns Hopkins’ Ebola Protective Suit Honored in Fast Company ‘Innovation by Design Awards’

The Johns Hopkins University’s new personal protective suit for front-line health care workers in Ebola outbreaks has been honored as one of 10 finalists in the Social Good category of Fast Company’s 2015 Innovation by Design Awards.

Johns Hopkins Joins National Sustainable Nanotechnology Project

Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University have joined a national effort to produce environmentally friendly materials built at the atomic and molecular scale.The environmental impact of materials used in emerging areas of nanotechnology – used, for instance, in video screens, solar cells and electric car batteries – is largely unknown, but scientists working across the country under a new federal grant hope to learn how these products affect the natural world before their commercial use expands.

Johns Hopkins Partners with Coursera to Offer Five New Online Courses Plus Capstone Project in Web Development

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals, the division of the Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering that administers online and part-time graduate programs, is launching a new series of online courses in Web development through Coursera, the world’s largest open online education provider.

Computer Algorithm Can Forecast Patients’ Deadly Sepsis

The quest for early diagnosis of septic shock — which kills more Americans every year than AIDS and breast and prostate cancer combined – now takes a step forward, as Johns Hopkins University researchers report on a more effective way to spot hospital patients at risk of septic shock. The new computer-based method correctly predicts septic shock in 85 percent of cases, without increasing the false positive rate from screening methods that are common now.

Cyber Security Experts to Discuss Tricky Balance Between Data Sharing and Privacy

In its efforts to curb criminal activity, should the government be allowed to see confidential consumer data collected by businesses? Or does the right to privacy trump such intrusions? These complex questions will be the focus of the second annual Senior Executive Cyber Security Conference, to be held Thursday, Sept. 10, at Johns Hopkins University. Registration for the daylong event is under way.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Future Engineers Use Their Noodles to Build Bridges from Spaghetti

About 160 high school students will compete in the annual Spaghetti Bridge Contest, marking the culmination of a four-week summer course called Engineering Innovation.

$2.2 Million NSF Grant Will Help Johns Hopkins Train New Cybersecurity Experts

At a time when cybersecurity attacks are more frequent and damaging, the National Science Foundation has awarded $2.2 million to the Johns Hopkins University Information Security Institute to support a graduate-level degree program that teaches students how to recognize and protect against digital threats. The grant will be allocated over five years as part of the Federal CyberCorps: Scholarship for Service Program.

New Computing Center in Baltimore Will Offer Bigger Home for ‘Big Data’ Projects

Whether they’re studying distant galaxies or deadly diseases deep within human cells, Big Data researchers increasingly need more powerful computers and more digital storage space. To address this demand, two Maryland universities are preparing to open one of the nation’s largest academic high-performance computing centers, located at the edge of the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center campus in Baltimore.

Johns Hopkins Boosts Online Options with Applied Biomedical Engineering Master’s Degree

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals, the division of the Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering that administers part-time and online graduate programs, has announced that students can now complete its Applied Biomedical Engineering program online.

Tamper-Resistant Pill Dispenser Aims to Stamp Out Medication Misuse

You can whack it with a hammer, attack it with a drill, or even stab it with a screwdriver. But try as you might, you won’t be able to tamper with a high-tech pill dispenser designed by mechanical engineering students at Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering. Which is exactly the point.

Johns Hopkins Math Students a Hit With Minor League Baseball Schedulers

With the help of some Johns Hopkins University math students, Minor League Baseball is catching up with the majors in using computers to produce its game schedules.

Noninvasive Brain Stimulator May Ease Parkinson’s Symptoms in a Patient’s Home

Parkinson’s disease patients whose symptoms such as tremor, muscle stiffness and slowed movement make it tough to hold an eating utensil steady have few options for relief outside of a hospital or clinic. To give these patients another in-home treatment option, Johns Hopkins graduate students have invented a headband-shaped device to deliver noninvasive brain stimulation to help tamp down the symptoms.

New Kit May Help Train Global Health Providers to Insert and Remove Contraceptive Implants

To address a global health challenge, a team of Johns Hopkins University biomedical engineering undergraduates has developed a teaching set called the Contraceptive Implant Training Tool Kit or CITT Kit, for short. The medical simulator includes two training models: a stand-alone replica arm and a layered band that can be worn by health workers who act as “patients” during practice sessions.

Who’s Making Sure the Power Stays On?

Electricity systems in the United States are so haphazardly regulated for reliability, it’s nearly impossible for customers to know their true risk of losing service in a major storm, a Johns Hopkins University analysis found.

Klausen Awarded Energy Department “Early Career” Honor

Rebekka S. Klausen, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry at the Johns Hopkins University, is among 44 young scientists across the country chosen to receive grants from the U.S. Energy Department’s Office of Science under the agency’s Early Career Research Program.

Two Johns Hopkins Researchers Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Two Johns Hopkins University professors, Aravinda Chakravarti and Donald Geman, are among 84 new members elected to the National Academy of Sciences, an honorary society that advises the government on scientific matters.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Teams of Student Entrepreneurs to Face Judges for $81,000 in Johns Hopkins Business Plan Funding on Friday, May 1

The nationally recognized Johns Hopkins University Business Plan Competition, hosted on Friday, May 1, by the Center for Leadership Education, will feature student teams from various divisions of Johns Hopkins University, as well as students representing The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Yale School of Management, and Tulane University. The teams will compete in one of four categories, for a portion of $81,000 in funding to be announced at a dinner that night.

Tiny Lab Devices Could Attack Huge Problem of Drug-Resistant Infections

A Johns Hopkins engineer, supported by a major NIH grant, is leading a multi-institution team that wants to keep bacterial infections from dodging the dwindling arsenal of drugs that destroy the deadly microbes. The group’s goal is to build palm-size devices that can quickly figure out which germ is causing a hospital-linked infection and then identify the right drug and dosage needed to kill the bacteria.

Media Advisory for Science Writers: Neuroscience will be Focus of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology Symposium

On Friday, May 1, the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) hosts its ninth annual multidisciplinary symposium, featuring six faculty speakers and 100 multidisciplinary research posters. Neuro X is the title and theme for the symposium, which will run from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Owens Auditorium on the Johns Hopkins medical campus.