About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Hundreds of College Students to Convene at JHU for Marathon Weekend Hackathon

Graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University this weekend for the latest HopHacks, a marathon session. The event challenges students to realize their best software and hardware ideas and compete for cash and other sponsored prizes.

Can a Cockroach Teach a Robot How to Scurry Across Rugged Terrain?

When they turn up in family pantries or restaurant kitchens, cockroaches are commonly despised as ugly, unhealthy pests and are quickly killed. But in the name of science, Johns Hopkins researchers have put these unwanted bugs to work.

JHU Researchers Elected Into National Academy of Engineering

Two Johns Hopkins University researchers were awarded one of the highest professional distinctions for engineers: election into the National Academy of Engineering.

Mind of a Medalist: Scientists Explain How the Brain Can Lead to Olympic Gold

Any athlete who’s made it to the Olympics has speed or strength or whatever physical skills it takes to lead the world in their sport. But Johns Hopkins University scientists say those who ultimately bring home gold have also honed the mind of a medalist.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Super Bowl Marks the Season’s End, But Concussion Concerns Continue

During this year’s Super Bowl, K.T. Ramesh, a biomechanics expert at Johns Hopkins University, will pay more attention to the collateral damage that can occur during football games: head injuries. He is developing a technological tool to help better diagnose concussions and predict where related brain damage has likely occurred.

Media Advisory: 55 Baltimore City School Teams to Compete in Robotics Contest at Johns Hopkins

On Saturday, Jan. 7, 2018, more than 200 elementary, middle and high school students from Baltimore City Public Schools will compete in the Hopkins Robotics Cup, the Baltimore City VEX and VEX IQ Robotics League’s championship event at Johns Hopkins Homewood Campus..

Johns Hopkins Engineering Students Build Custom Walker for Special Needs Toddler

Santa’s helpers made a visit to the Port Deposit, Maryland, family this week, delivering a gift that promises to make their holiday season especially happy and bright: a walker that was custom-designed and constructed for the family’s smallest member by a group of Johns Hopkins engineering students.

Secrets of Ancient Egypt May Spark Better Fuel Cells for Tomorrow’s Cars

To make modern-day fuel cells less expensive and more powerful, a team led by Johns Hopkins chemical engineers has drawn inspiration from the ancient Egyptian tradition of gilding.

New Computer Model Sheds Light on Biological Events Leading to Sudden Cardiac Death

Some heart disease patients face a higher risk of sudden cardiac death, which can happen when an arrhythmia—an irregular heartbeat—disrupts the normal electrical activity in the heart and causes the organ to stop pumping. However, arrhythmias linked to sudden cardiac death are very rare, making it difficult to study how they occur—and how they might be prevented. To make it much easier to discover what triggers this deadly disorder, a team led by Johns Hopkins researchers constructed a powerful new computer model that replicates the biological activity within the heart that precedes sudden cardiac death.

Researchers Devise Sensors and Phone App to Find Early Signs of Sickness in Newborns

A Johns Hopkins University team that includes biomedical engineering faculty and graduate students, global health experts and technology specialists will receive a $100,000 grant to support their plan to enable mothers in remote villages to use novel, low-cost sensors and a simple cell phone app to spot serious health problems during their newborn babies’ critical first week. The university’s NeMo team, short for Neonatal Monitoring, was named as one of 51 new Grand Challenges Explorations winners in an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

University Buys Baltimore’s Landmark Stieff Silver Site

The Johns Hopkins University today bought Baltimore’s historic Stieff Silver complex, making a highly visible symbol of the city’s manufacturing heritage formally a part of its future in the knowledge economy.

Johns Hopkins-led Team Aims to Turn Computer Systems into Digital Detectives

Imagine an embassy bombing. Consider the massive amount and varied types of data that investigators would need to review to determine who carried out the attack and how it was done. Such a probe could involve the slow, painstaking examinations of video footage, photos, internet communications, telephone records and other material. A Johns Hopkins University-led international team of scientists, supported by an $11-million, five-year U.S. Department of Defense grant, wants to streamline such investigations by developing algorithms for extracting the most useful information from multi-modal data.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Don’t Let These Creepy Skeletons Get Under Your Skin

On Halloween night, from their haunted hiding places beneath Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus, scary skeletons will come to life in the dark depths of Hackerman Hall—and begin to dance!

Media Advisory: Is Your Personal Data Safe from a ‘Krack Attack’?

Two widely respected Johns Hopkins University scholars are available to talk to members of the news media about how serious the Wi-Fi flaw is, which equipment is most at risk and how users can protect themselves.

JHU Undergrads’ ‘Nasal Relief’ Team Named Finalist in Collegiate Inventors Competition

A Johns Hopkins student team that wants to help people breathe easier has scored a coveted finalist spot in the 2017 Collegiate Inventors Competition, organizers of the event have announced. The students devised a simple, discreet device to open obstructed nostrils, a common problem that can cause snoring and other sleep disruptions, as well as exercising difficulties.

Science and Health News Tips from Johns Hopkins

These news tips, from stories in the fall 2017 issue of Johns Hopkins Magazine, include an engineer/fisherman’s idea for a “smart” lure and the need for a really high SPF sunscreen for a new solar probe.

DNA Triggers Shape-Shifting in Hydrogels, Opening a New Way to Make ‘Soft Robots’

Biochemical engineers at Johns Hopkins University have used sequences of DNA molecules to induce shape-changing in water-based gels, demonstrating a new tactic to produce soft robots and “smart” medical devices that do not rely on cumbersome wires, batteries or tethers.

Media Advisory: Cyber Security Conference at Johns Hopkins University Features Experts from Academia, Industry, Retired General’s Keynote on Threats

The 4th Annual Cyber Security Conference for Executives, co-sponsored by Johns Hopkins University and Compass Cyber Security, presents a forum for experts from academia, private business, and government to share their knowledge and experience.

Media Advisory: Hundreds of College Students to Gather at Johns Hopkins for Weekend of HopHacks

More than 300 graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University for the latest HopHacks, a marathon session challenging students to realize their best software and hardware ideas and compete for cash and other sponsored prizes.

MEDIA ADVISORY: More Hurricane Experts from Johns Hopkins University

This is an additional list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on issues associated with Hurricane Harvey and now Hurricane Irma

MEDIA ADVISORY: More Hurricane Harvey Experts from Johns Hopkins University

This is a third list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on issues associated with the onslaught and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

MEDIA ADVISORY: More Hurricane Harvey Experts from Johns Hopkins University

This is a second list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on issues associated with the onslaught and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Hurricane Experts from Johns Hopkins University

A list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on various issues associated with the formation, onslaught and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. This list will be updated as warranted.

Materials Scientists Probe Protein’s Role in Speeding Ebola Spread

Two Johns Hopkins materials science graduate students and their professors played a key role in a multi-institution research project that pinpointed how a tiny protein seems to make the deadly Ebola virus particularly contagious.

Method Determines Cell Age More Accurately, Could Help Elderly Patients

Led by scientists at Johns Hopkins University, a team of researchers is reporting progress in developing a method to accurately determine the functional age of cells, a step that could eventually help clinicians evaluate and recommend ways to delay some health effects of aging and potentially improve other treatments, including skin graft matching and predicting prospects for wound healing.