About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available

Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available.

JHU Project Aims to Save Millions by Reducing Solar Power Forecast Errors

Although the popularity of solar energy has surged, the unpredictability of a weather-dependent technology has kept even more people from embracing it. A new Johns Hopkins University-led project hopes to change that by improving our ability to forecast sunshine and backup power needs.

Flaw Found in Water Treatment Methods

Some potentially toxic chemicals in water may be created, ironically, during the water treatment process itself.

Science and Health News Tips from Johns Hopkins

These news tips come from stories in the winter issue of Johns Hopkins Magazine.

Secrets of Ancient Egypt May Spark Better Fuel Cells for Tomorrow’s Cars

To make modern-day fuel cells less expensive and more powerful, a team led by Johns Hopkins chemical engineers has drawn inspiration from the ancient Egyptian tradition of gilding.

JHU Scientist Crowdsources Rocks Harboring Earthly “Extraterrestrials”

Crowdsourcing has been used to create an online photography archive, finance a British rock band’s tour and search for intelligent life on other planets. Now, Johns Hopkins University biologist Jocelyne DiRuggiero is hoping the approach can help her find rocks.

Environmentalist Winona LaDuke to Speak at Johns Hopkins

The next event in the JHU Forums on Race in America will feature environmentalist Winona LaDuke.

Climate Change Likely to be More Deadly in Poor African Settlements

Conditions in crowded, urban settlements in Africa make worse the effects of climate change, pushing temperatures to dangerous heights for children and the elderly in those areas, according to a new study led by a Johns Hopkins University scientist.

MEDIA ADVISORY: More Hurricane Experts from Johns Hopkins University

This is an additional list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on issues associated with Hurricane Harvey and now Hurricane Irma

MEDIA ADVISORY: More Hurricane Harvey Experts from Johns Hopkins University

This is a third list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on issues associated with the onslaught and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

MEDIA ADVISORY: More Hurricane Harvey Experts from Johns Hopkins University

This is a second list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on issues associated with the onslaught and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Researchers to Present Their Work on Capitol Hill

Early career scientists, physicians, engineers and specialists in public health, nursing, music and marketing from Johns Hopkins University will gather on Capitol Hill in Washington to present their federally-funded research, emphasizing the importance of continuing federal support in the pursuit of new knowledge and innovation.

Mouse Tests Aim to Show How Genes and Environment Join Forces to Cause Disease

When researchers try to uncover the cause of disease, they commonly start with two questions: Did a quirk in the patient’s genes open the door to illness? Did exposure to environmental factors play havoc with the patient’s health? Very often, both troublemakers are at least partly to blame. To provide the most effective treatment, doctors need to know as much as possible about how these partners in sickness and poor health work together.

How Do Energy Policies and Climate Change Affect Air Quality—and Our Health?

A new interdisciplinary science team, led by experts from Yale and Johns Hopkins universities and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, will try to figure how power generation trends, climate change and public policy interact to affect air quality. A key goal is to trace how the resulting changes in air pollution may affect the health of people who live and work in the mid-Atlantic area.

Rapid Plankton Growth in Ocean Seen as Sign of Carbon Dioxide Loading

A microscopic marine alga is thriving in the North Atlantic to an extent that defies scientific predictions, suggesting swift environmental change as a result of rising carbon dioxide in the ocean, a study led a by Johns Hopkins University scientist has found.

Johns Hopkins Joins National Sustainable Nanotechnology Project

Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University have joined a national effort to produce environmentally friendly materials built at the atomic and molecular scale.The environmental impact of materials used in emerging areas of nanotechnology – used, for instance, in video screens, solar cells and electric car batteries – is largely unknown, but scientists working across the country under a new federal grant hope to learn how these products affect the natural world before their commercial use expands.

Advisory: Johns Hopkins Business Experts Available to Discuss Hurricane Katrina

To assist journalists covering the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School experts are available to comment on issues related to risk management, preparedness, community development, infrastructure, health, finance and related issues.

Johns Hopkins Researchers Partner with Resorts World Sentosa in Singapore to Probe Mercury Levels in Dolphins

Johns Hopkins environmental scientists are collaborating with researchers from Dolphin Island at Resorts World Sentosa, Singapore, to learn more about how and where mercury accumulates in the bodies of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins.

How Climate Change Could Leave Cities in the Dark

Cities like Miami are all too familiar with hurricane-related power outages. But a Johns Hopkins University analysis finds climate change will give other major metro areas a lot to worry about in the future.

Testosterone In Male Songbirds May Enhance Desire To Sing But Not Song Quality

Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University have found that introducing testosterone in select areas of a male canary’s brain can affect its ability to successfully attract and mate with a female through birdsong. They also found that enhancing song activity based on testosterone in one brain area can change the size of a separate brain area that regulates song quality.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Huge Shake Tables Will Replicate an Earthquake Beneath a Two-Story Test Building in Buffalo

On Friday, Aug. 16, a team led by Johns Hopkins University researchers will conduct final tests to see how a Southern California earthquake could impact a two-story office building. Inside a lab at the University at Buffalo in New York, two massive shake tables will be use to reproduce the strongest seismic forces recorded during the catastrophic Northridge earthquake in 1994.

Johns Hopkins Geologist Naomi Levin Wins Young Scientist Award

A Johns Hopkins University geologist has won the prestigious Young Scientist Award from the Geological Society of America for the contributions she has made to the understanding of the environments of early humans in Africa. Naomi Levin, an assistant professor, will receive her award at the geological society’s 125th anniversary conference in Denver on October 29.

Turning Algae into Clean Energy and Fish Food; Helping Africans to Irrigate Crops

Could algae that feast on wastewater produce clean bio-fuels and a healthful supply of fish food? Can impoverished African community gardeners learn to use and maintain a simple centuries-old, non-electric water pump to grow more vegetables? Two Johns Hopkins student teams are working hard to move these “green” ideas off the drawing board and into the real world. Both teams will showcase their progress at the 2013 National Sustainable Design Expo, scheduled April 18 and 19, in Washington, D.C. The event, which will be open to the public on the National Mall, is sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Oceans 2013: Johns Hopkins Scientist Says Circulation Changes Due to Ozone Thinning

According to a Johns Hopkins earth scientist, the hole in the Antarctic ozone layer has caused changes in the way that waters in those southern oceans mix – a situation that has the potential to alter the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere and eventually could have an impact on global climate change. In a paper published in today’s issue of the journal Science, Darryn W. Waugh and his team show that subtropical intermediate waters in the southern oceans have become “younger” as the upwelling, circumpolar waters have gotten “older” – changes that are consistent with the fact that surface winds have strengthened as the ozone layer has thinned.

Plan to Turn Farm Waste into Paper Earns $15,000 Prize for Johns Hopkins Students

Three Johns Hopkins engineering students have won a $15,000 prize in a national sustainable development competition for adapting a traditional Korean paper-making technique into an inexpensive way for impoverished villagers to produce paper for schools.