About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Mercury in Dolphins: Study Compares Toxin Levels in Captive and Wild Sea Mammals

Amid growing concerns about the spread of harmful mercury in plants and animals, a new study by researchers from The Johns Hopkins University and The National Aquarium has compared levels of the chemical in captive dolphins with dolphins found in the wild. The captive animals were fed a controlled diet, while the wild mammals dined on marine life that may carry more of the toxic metal.

Johns Hopkins Carey Business School Shifts Focus to Business of Healthcare

The Johns Hopkins Carey Business School has reorganized to focus its degree programs on the study of business issues related to healthcare and the life sciences, Interim Dean Phillip Phan has announced. “We’re making this move not just because we are Johns Hopkins, with the best medical institutions in the world, but also because health care is an increasingly important part of the economic discussion in the United States,” said Phan.

Johns Hopkins Flips the Switch on a Large Solar Project

As part of its ongoing efforts to shrink its carbon footprint, The Johns Hopkins University has installed more than 2,900 solar panels on seven buildings on the Homewood and East Baltimore campuses.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Engineers Without Borders to Showcase Humanitarian Projects

Members of the Johns Hopkins University chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB-JHU) — who have launched humanitarian efforts in Ecuador, Guatemala and South Africa — will discuss their work at the group’s annual showcase on Sunday, Feb. 25.

Media Advisory: News source on potential environmental damage from the Italian shipwreck

Johns Hopkins University environmental engineer Edward J. Bouwer is available to speak to reporters wondering what could happen to the gasoline and oil on board the Costa Concordia if fuel starts to leak from the wrecked cruise ship.

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals Instructor Elected Vice President of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers

Christian Davies-Venn, an instructor in the Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals program, has been elected vice president of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers. His term as AAEE vice president began on Jan.1. He is slated to serve as the academy’s president-elect in 2013 and as its president in 2014.

A Decline in Dead Zones: Study Shows Efforts to Heal Chesapeake Bay Are Working

Efforts to reduce the flow of fertilizers, animal waste and other pollutants into the Chesapeake Bay appear to be giving a boost to the bay’s health, a new study that analyzed 60 years of water quality data has concluded. The study, published in the November 2011 issue of Estuaries and Coasts, was conducted by researchers from The Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals Extends Master’s Program in Environmental Engineering and Science to Students Online

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals (EP), part of the Whiting School of Engineering, has announced that one of its master’s degree programs, Environmental Engineering and Science, is now fully online.

New Johns Hopkins Institute Studies Environment, Energy, Sustainability and Health

Drawing on faculty expertise in environmental science and engineering, public health and other areas, The Johns Hopkins University has launched an Environment, Energy, Sustainability and Health Institute to promote research and education in topics ranging from green energy practices to climate change and related health issues.

‘Green’ Power Alert: New Study Yields Better Turbine Spacing for Large Wind Farms

Large wind farms are being built around the world as a cleaner way to generate electricity, but operators are still searching for the most efficient way to arrange the massive turbines that turn moving air into power. To help steer wind farm owners in the right direction, Charles Meneveau, a Johns Hopkins fluid mechanics and turbulence expert, working with a colleague in Belgium, has devised a new formula through which the optimal spacing for a large array of turbines can be obtained.

Charles O’Melia, Leading Water Treatment Researcher and Longtime Johns Hopkins Professor, Dies at 76

Charles R. O’Melia, one of the world’s leading water treatment researchers, who also mentored more than 100 environmental engineering graduate students during almost three decades at The Johns Hopkins University, died Dec. 16, at age 76.

Futures Seminars to Determine Academic Direction at Johns Hopkins

Ten distinguished cognitive neuroscientists, cognitive psychologists and linguists from top institutions across the country will gather at Shriver and Mason halls this week to discuss what promise to be the most exciting new developments in the study of the mind and brain over the coming decade. Sponsored by the departments of Cognitive Science and Psychological and Brain Sciences and the Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, this seminar will do more than stimulate discussion: It will create a blueprint for the future of cognitive and brain sciences at The Johns Hopkins University. This event is the seventh in a series of Futures Seminars that began in September with the Classics Department and has included sessions for the departments of Physics and Astronomy, Anthropology and History; the Humanities Center; and the Film and Media Studies program. By this time next year, 21 Futures Seminars comprising every department, discipline and program in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences will have been held, according to Katherine Newman, the James B. Knapp Dean of the school.

New JHU Computer To Enable Data Analysis Not Possible Today

Imagine a tool that is a cross between a powerful electron microscope and the Hubble Space Telescope, allowing scientists from disciplines ranging from medicine and genetics to astrophysics, environmental science, oceanography and bioinformatics to examine and analyze enormous amounts of data from both “little picture” and “big picture” perspectives.Using a $2.1 million grant from the National Science Foundation, a group led by computer scientist and astrophysicist Alexander Szalay of Johns Hopkins’ Institute for Data Intensive Engineering and Science is designing and developing such a tool, dubbed the Data-Scope.

Nano-Magic to Super Synapses: Johns Hopkins Exhibits to Appear at USA Science Festival

Six teams of Johns Hopkins researchers with expertise in nanotechnology, particle physics and other fields will participate in a sprawling exposition this weekend at the inaugural USA Science & Engineering Festival in Washington, D.C.

Your Brain on Art: Symposium Examines The Science of the Arts

For centuries, philosophers have speculated about the links between beauty, human perception, creativity and pleasure. In recent years, scientists have learned a great deal about sensory systems and human response to the visual world, three-dimensional space, sound, touch, taste and smell. To further explore these ideas, the Johns Hopkins Brain Science Institute will host a two-day public symposium titled, “The Science of the Arts: Perceptual Neuroscience and Aesthetics” on Wednesday and Thursday, Oct. 20 and 21 at the American Visionary Art Museum and the Baltimore Museum of Art.

Johns Hopkins first in R&D expenditures for 31st year

The Johns Hopkins University performed $1.85 billion in medical, science and engineering research in fiscal 2009, making it the leading U.S. academic institution in total research and development spending for the 31st year in a row, according to a new National Science Foundation ranking. The university also once again ranked first on the NSF’s separate list of federally funded research and development, spending $1.58 billion in FY2009 on research supported by NSF, NASA, the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Defense.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Students Help City Nonprofits Become More “Eco-Friendly”

In an effort to engage a new and promising audience in Baltimore City’s greening efforts, six Johns Hopkins University students will be visiting three Baltimore City nonprofits this week to help assess their sustainability and to advise them on how to save their organizations money on energy and other resources. A collaboration between the university and Baltimore City, this “Climate Showcase Project” – which was launched in June — strives to help nonprofits become more eco-friendly, while educating students on both sustainability measures and the vital role that these socially focused organizations play in the community.

Johns Hopkins Joins Study of Oil Spill’s Possible Impact on Florida Ecosystem

Johns Hopkins researchers are participating in a multi-institution team that hopes to determine how the Deepwater Horizon Gulf of Mexico oil spill may affect a sensitive aquatic environment off the coast of Florida.

Carey Business School Begins Move To Harbor East

The Johns Hopkins Carey Business School will be in the moving business this week as it takes up residence at its new home on the waterfront at Harbor East. The business school, headquartered for much of the past decade at the Downtown Center at Charles and Fayette streets, will be moving equipment and supplies later this week to its new campus at 100 International Drive. Administrators and faculty and staff members will show up for their first day of work at Harbor East on July 26. In early August, the 80-plus members of the charter class of the Johns Hopkins Global MBA, the signature full-time program of the business school, will arrive at the new campus for orientation. A few weeks later, approximately 1,750 students in Carey’s part-time programs will begin classes at Harbor East.

Johns Hopkins Hits $200 Million Mark in Recovery Act Grants

The Johns Hopkins University has to date been awarded more than $200 million in National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation research grants through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, also known as the federal stimulus package. The 424 grants are financing investigations ranging from how the universe began to how men and women differ in their responses to the influenza virus to new strategies to prevent muscle loss caused by diseases such as muscular dystrophy. The grants also have underwritten the creation of 164 staff jobs, 32 of which are still open.

Some Like It Hot: Site of Human Evolution Was Scorching

If you think summer in your hometown is hot, consider it fortunate that you don’t live in the Turkana Basin of Kenya, where the average daily temperature has reached the mid-90s or higher, year-round, for the past 4 million years. The need to stay cool in that cradle of human evolution may relate, at least in part, to why pre-humans learned to walk upright, lost the fur that covered the bodies of their predecessors and became able to sweat more, Johns Hopkins University earth scientist Benjamin Passey said.

Media Advisory: Professor Available to Speak on Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico

Edward J. Bouwer – Expert on environmental damage, oil biodegradation, prospects for recovery and cleanup options, including the use of bacteria that consume oil.

JHU to halve CO2 greenhouse gas emissions in 15 years

The Johns Hopkins University will cut its emissions of climate-changing carbon dioxide gas by more than half from projected levels by 2025, the university announced today.

Comments on Johns Hopkins’ Climate/Sustainability Plan

Comments by elected officials, students and members of the President’s Task Force of Climate Change on the Johns Hopkins climate change and sustainability plan announced on March 11, 2010.

Johns Hopkins legend “Reds” Wolman dies at 85

President Ronald J. Daniels and Dean of Engineering Nicholas P. Jones sent this broadcast e-mail message to Johns Hopkins University faculty, students and staff on Thursday, Feb. 25, announcing the death of M. Gordon “Reds” Wolman, the university’s B. Howell Griswold Jr. Professor of Geography and International Affairs.