About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Insight Into Swimming Fish Could Lead to Robotics Advances

The constant movement of fish that seems random is actually precisely deployed to provide them at any moment with the best sensory feedback they need any to navigate the world, Johns Hopkins University researchers found.

JHU collaborates with Morgan, Coppin to promote STEM diversity

With $2.46 million in support from the National Institutes of Health, the Johns Hopkins University is teaming up with two historically black Baltimore institutions, Morgan State and Coppin State universities, to cultivate a diverse group of highly trained biomedical researchers.

Owls Help JHU Scientists Unlock Secret of How the Brain Pays Attention

By studying barn owls, scientists at Johns Hopkins University believe they’ve taken an important step toward solving the longstanding mystery of how the brain chooses what most deserves attention.

Scientists Find Brain Signal That Might Help Us Judge the Holiday Buffet

At holiday buffets and potlucks people make quick calculations about which dishes to try and how much to take of each. Johns Hopkins University neuroscientists have found a brain region that appears to be strongly connected to these food preference decisions.

Human Retinas Grown in a Dish Explain How Color Vision Develops

Biologists at Johns Hopkins University grew human retinas from scratch to determine how cells that allow people to see in color are made.

Gambling Monkeys Help Scientists Find Brain Area Linked to High-Risk Behavior

Monkeys who learned how to gamble have helped researchers pinpoint an area of the brain key to one’s willingness to make risky decisions.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available

Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available.

JHU Project Aims to Save Millions by Reducing Solar Power Forecast Errors

Although the popularity of solar energy has surged, the unpredictability of a weather-dependent technology has kept even more people from embracing it. A new Johns Hopkins University-led project hopes to change that by improving our ability to forecast sunshine and backup power needs.

JHU and Lockheed Martin to Host Science and Engineering Expo at Baltimore City School

The Johns Hopkins University, Lockheed Martin and Barclay Elementary/Middle School will come together for an evening designed to showcase the science and engineering projects that students have been working on in the classroom all year.

JHU Records Brain Activity of a Free-flying Bat

Johns Hopkins University researchers have developed a way to study the brain of a bat as it flies, recording for the first time what happens as an animal focuses its attention.

JHU Scientists Discover How Extremophiles Flourish in Stressful Environments

Thousands of molecules of ribonucleic acid make salt-loving microbes known as “extremophiles” highly resistant to the phenomenon oxidative stress – the uncontrollable production of unstable forms of oxygen called “free radicals,” which can negatively affect DNA, proteins, and lipids in cells.

JHU Finds How Brain Instantly Tells Trash from Treasure

Johns Hopkins University neuroscientists have found how the brain can detect an object’s value almost as soon as we see it.

Coalition Seeks to Increase Transparency on Life Science Career Prospects

Nine U.S. research universities, incliuding Johns Hopkins, and a major cancer institute announced plans to give would-be life scientists clear, standardized data on graduate school admissions, education and training opportunities, and career prospects.

JHU Finds Why We Can’t Always Stop What We’ve Started

When we try to stop a body movement at the last second, perhaps to keep ourselves from stepping on what we just realized was ice, we can’t always do it — and Johns Hopkins University neuroscientists have figured out why.

Johns Hopkins Finds Training Exercise That Boosts Brain Power

One of the two brain-training methods most scientists use in research is significantly better in improving memory and attention, Johns Hopkins University researchers found. It also results in more significant changes in brain activity.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Help Show Links Between Genes, Body Tissues

Johns Hopkins University scientists are part of a research team assessing how a person’s genetic profile affects his body. The results could help show how individual genetic differences contribute to disease and guide treatments for heritable disorders such as Alzheimer’s, high cholesterol or Type I diabetes.

Mapping the Brain, Neuron by Neuron

Johns Hopkins University experts are part of an international team of scientists that has taken another step toward mapping how brains work.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Researchers to Present Their Work on Capitol Hill

Early career scientists, physicians, engineers and specialists in public health, nursing, music and marketing from Johns Hopkins University will gather on Capitol Hill in Washington to present their federally-funded research, emphasizing the importance of continuing federal support in the pursuit of new knowledge and innovation.

Can You Hear Me Now?

When trying to be heard over noise, humans and animals raise their voices. It’s a split-second feat, from ear to brain to vocalization, and Johns Hopkins University researchers are the first to measure just how fast it happens in bats: 30 milliseconds. That’s 10 times faster than the blink of an eye, a record for audio-vocal response.

New Cellular Target May Put the Brakes on Cancer’s Ability to Spread

A team led by Johns Hopkins researchers has discovered a biochemical signaling process that causes densely packed cancer cells to break away from a tumor and spread the disease elsewhere in the body.

Whose Line is it Anyway? New Hopkins Class Teaches Engineers to Think on Their Feet

Offered for the first time this semester, “Improvisation for Scientists and Engineers” uses lessons borrowed from theater classes to help such students hone their off-the-cuff verbal skills and develop poise in front of groups – valued skills in the professional world.

It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s – a Key Discovery About Human Memory

As Superman flies over the city, people on the ground famously suppose they see a bird, then a plane, and then finally realize it’s a superhero. But they haven’t just spotted the Man of Steel – they’ve experienced the ideal conditions to create a very strong memory of him.

Johns Hopkins University cognitive psychologists are the first to link human’s long-term visual memory with how things move. The key, they found, lies in whether we can visually track an object. When people see Superman, they don’t think they’re seeing a bird, a plane and a superhero. They know it’s just one thing – even though the distance, lighting and angle change how he looks.

Wanted: Self-Driving Cells to Pursue Deadly Bacteria

Drawing on their expertise in control systems and cell biology, Johns Hopkins University researchers are setting out to design and test troops of self-directed microscopic warriors that can locate and neutralize dangerous strains of bacteria.

Intersession Students Learn the Science Behind Party Food

Beer, wine and cheese are classic party foods that couldn’t be made without fermentation. Fermentation is also the key behind food trends like pickling and the tea drink kombucha. In a one-credit intersession course, Johns Hopkins University undergraduates will learn the chemistry behind this biological process, science that will help them understand when they should send back a bottle of wine, what sets a stout apart from a lager, and why some cheeses ooze while others crumble.

Captured on Video: DNA Nanotubes Build a Bridge Between Two Molecular Posts

In a microscopic feat that resembled a high-wire circus act, Johns Hopkins researchers have coaxed DNA nanotubes to assemble themselves into bridge-like structures arched between two molecular landmarks on the surface of a lab dish. The team captured examples of this unusual nanoscale performance on video.