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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Senior Named Rhodes Scholar

Johns Hopkins University senior Peter Kalugin has been named a Rhodes Scholar, one of the top awards available to American college students.

Deep-Earth Carbon Offers Clues About Origin of Life on Earth

New findings by a Johns Hopkins University-led team reveal long unknown details about carbon deep beneath the Earth’s surface and suggest ways this subterranean carbon might have influenced the history of life on the planet.

Johns Hopkins University Neuroscientist to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award

 November 17, 2014 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Tracey Reeves Office: 443-997-9903 Cell: 443-986-4053 treeves@jhu.edu Michela Gallagher, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University, doesn’t just study the brain. She mentors young scientists on the importance and rewards of studying it too. Over the course of her career, Gallagher has spent almost as [...]

Johns Hopkins University Astrophysicist Shares $3 Million Breakthrough Prize

Adam Riess, a professor of physics and astronomy at Johns Hopkins University and a Nobel laureate, has been named a recipient of the Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics for the discovery of the acceleration of the universe. Riess received the award, the most lucrative academic prize in the world, at a ceremony in California on Sunday.

Johns Hopkins Astrophysicist Receives Prestigious Packard Fellowship

Johns Hopkins astrophysicist Brice Ménard has been awarded a 2014 David and Lucile Packard Foundation Fellowship for Science and Engineering. Ménard plans to use this fellowship to work on a new technique to estimate the distance of galaxies and then explore new directions of research.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Robert Resnick Lecture

A physicist with path breaking research in materials science and in the development of quantitative models for biological systems will deliver the annual Robert Resnick Lecture at Johns Hopkins University.

Two Johns Hopkins Researchers Receive Pew Charitable Trusts Awards

Robert J. Johnston, a biologist at The Johns Hopkins University, studying how cells randomly choose their fates during development and Andrew J. Holland, a molecular biologist at the university’s School of Medicine, whose work focuses on how dividing cells create the correct number of centrosomes, have been named Pew scholars for their promising work in the area of health sciences.

Johns Hopkins Appoints Three to Bloomberg Distinguished Professorship Positions

The new appointees are Patricia H. Janak, a neuroscientist specializing in associative learning and addiction; Stephen Morgan, a sociologist with expertise in education and inequality; and Kathleen Sutcliffe, an organizational sociologist focused on organizational reliability and safety. Janak, Morgan, and Sutcliffe will begin their new roles on July 1.

JHU Biologists Identify New Neural Pathway in Eyes that Aids in Vision

A type of retina cell plays a more critical role in vision than previously known, a team led by Johns Hopkins University researchers has discovered.

Johns Hopkins Neuroscientists Find Brain Activity May Mark the Beginning of Memories

By tracking brain activity when an animal stops to look around its environment, neuroscientists at Johns Hopkins University believe they can mark the birth of a memory.

Testosterone In Male Songbirds May Enhance Desire To Sing But Not Song Quality

Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University have found that introducing testosterone in select areas of a male canary’s brain can affect its ability to successfully attract and mate with a female through birdsong. They also found that enhancing song activity based on testosterone in one brain area can change the size of a separate brain area that regulates song quality.

MedImmune, JHU Agree to Five-Year Research Deal

MedImmune, AstraZeneca’s global biologics research and development arm, and The Johns Hopkins University have entered into a five-year $6.5 million research collaboration.

Scientists Study Some Fishy Behavior to Solve an Animal Locomotion Mystery

A quirk of nature has long baffled biologists: Why do animals push in directions that don’t point toward their goal, like the side-to-side sashaying of a running lizard or cockroach? An engineer building a robot would likely avoid these movements because they seem wasteful. So why do animals behave this way? A multi-institutional research team, led by Johns Hopkins engineers, says it has solved this puzzle.

Johns Hopkins Project Aims to help Mid-Atlantic combat Hurricanes, Heat Waves

The National Science Foundation has awarded Seth Guikema, a Johns Hopkins University assistant professor of geography and environmental engineering, a $3 million grant to build a program that will determine the effect of repeated hurricanes and heat waves on the Mid-Atlantic region and suggest ways to improve the region’s ability to withstand them.

Five Johns Hopkins Engineering Doctoral Students Named 2014 Siebel Scholars

Five Johns Hopkins graduate students, recently named to the 2014 class of Siebel Scholars, are pushing the boundaries of medical technology to develop new and improved ways to diagnose and treat cancer, heart disease and other serious health problems. The students are trying to turn stem cells into healthy blood vessels, are testing biological reactions within microscopic droplets and are using advanced imaging techniques to detect disease at an early, treatable stage.

In recognition of their research skills, academic achievements and leadership qualities, the five PhD candidates are being honored as Johns Hopkins’ 2014 Siebel Scholars. The merit-based Siebel program provides $35,000 to each student for use in his or her final year of graduate studies.

Johns Hopkins Researchers Find Sympathetic Neurons Engage in “Cross Talk” With Cells in the Pancreas During Early Development

The human body is a complicated system of blood vessels, nerves, organs, tissue and cells each with a specific job to do. When all are working together, it’s a symphony of form and function as each instrument plays its intended roles. Biologist Rejji Kuruvilla and her fellow researchers uncovered what happens when one instrument is not playing its part.

Johns Hopkins Geologist Naomi Levin Wins Young Scientist Award

A Johns Hopkins University geologist has won the prestigious Young Scientist Award from the Geological Society of America for the contributions she has made to the understanding of the environments of early humans in Africa. Naomi Levin, an assistant professor, will receive her award at the geological society’s 125th anniversary conference in Denver on October 29.

Johns Hopkins Summer Program Hooks Baltimore City Teens on Science

Biophysics Research for Baltimore Teens, a paid summer internship program, aims to give city high school students from low-income communities a head start in science careers by exposing them to the thrills of university-level bio-medical lab work.

Johns Hopkins University Commencement, Thursday, May 23

The event will take place, rain or shine, from 8:40 a.m. to approximately noon on Thursday, May 23, on Homewood Field. The ceremony will feature remarks from President Ronald J. Daniels and a speech by Dr. Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa, the conferring of all degrees, and the bestowing of honorary degrees.

Three Johns Hopkins Students Receive Prestigious Goldwater Scholarships

Three undergraduate researchers at The Johns Hopkins University are among the 271 students recently awarded Goldwater Scholarships for the 2013-2014 academic year. The one- and two-year funding the three Johns Hopkins students receive will help further their investigations in molecular dynamics, the biomedical science of disease, and developing a computational tool to help surgeons treat epilepsy.

A turf battle in the retina helps internal clocks see the light

With every sunrise and sunset, our eyes make note of the light as it waxes and wanes, a process that is critical to aligning our circadian rhythms to match the solar day so we are alert during the day and restful at night. Watching the sun come and go sounds like a peaceful process, but Johns Hopkins scientists have discovered that behind the scenes, millions of specialized cells in our eyes are fighting for their lives to help the retina set the stage to keep our internal clocks ticking.

Oceans 2013: Johns Hopkins Scientist Says Circulation Changes Due to Ozone Thinning

According to a Johns Hopkins earth scientist, the hole in the Antarctic ozone layer has caused changes in the way that waters in those southern oceans mix – a situation that has the potential to alter the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere and eventually could have an impact on global climate change. In a paper published in today’s issue of the journal Science, Darryn W. Waugh and his team show that subtropical intermediate waters in the southern oceans have become “younger” as the upwelling, circumpolar waters have gotten “older” – changes that are consistent with the fact that surface winds have strengthened as the ozone layer has thinned.

Johns Hopkins senior Lay Kodama wins Churchill Scholarship

Lay Kodama, a Johns Hopkins University senior from Columbus, Ohio, has been selected as a Churchill Scholar by the Winston Churchill Foundation of the United States. The Churchill Scholarship is awarded to 14 students nationwide who have demonstrated a capacity to contribute to the advancement of knowledge in the sciences, engineering or mathematics by completing original, creative work at an advanced level.

Johns Hopkins Mathematicians Named Inaugural American Mathematical Society Fellows

Ten Johns Hopkins University mathematicians have been named Fellows of the American Mathematical Society for 2013, the program’s first year. The designation recognizes those who have made outstanding contributions to the creation, exposition, advancement, communication and utilization of mathematics.

Collecting Cancer Data in the ‘Cloud’ Could Lead to More Effective Treatment

Storing music and photos on distant computers via “cloud” technology is nothing new. But Johns Hopkins researchers are now using this tactic to collect detailed information from thousands of cancer cell samples. The goal is to help doctors make better predictions about how a patient’s illness will progress and what type of treatment will be most effective.

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