About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available

Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available.

JHU Project Aims to Save Millions by Reducing Solar Power Forecast Errors

Although the popularity of solar energy has surged, the unpredictability of a weather-dependent technology has kept even more people from embracing it. A new Johns Hopkins University-led project hopes to change that by improving our ability to forecast sunshine and backup power needs.

JHU and Lockheed Martin to Host Science and Engineering Expo at Baltimore City School

The Johns Hopkins University, Lockheed Martin and Barclay Elementary/Middle School will come together for an evening designed to showcase the science and engineering projects that students have been working on in the classroom all year.

JHU Records Brain Activity of a Free-flying Bat

Johns Hopkins University researchers have developed a way to study the brain of a bat as it flies, recording for the first time what happens as an animal focuses its attention.

JHU Scientists Discover How Extremophiles Flourish in Stressful Environments

Thousands of molecules of ribonucleic acid make salt-loving microbes known as “extremophiles” highly resistant to the phenomenon oxidative stress – the uncontrollable production of unstable forms of oxygen called “free radicals,” which can negatively affect DNA, proteins, and lipids in cells.

JHU Finds How Brain Instantly Tells Trash from Treasure

Johns Hopkins University neuroscientists have found how the brain can detect an object’s value almost as soon as we see it.

Coalition Seeks to Increase Transparency on Life Science Career Prospects

Nine U.S. research universities, incliuding Johns Hopkins, and a major cancer institute announced plans to give would-be life scientists clear, standardized data on graduate school admissions, education and training opportunities, and career prospects.

JHU Finds Why We Can’t Always Stop What We’ve Started

When we try to stop a body movement at the last second, perhaps to keep ourselves from stepping on what we just realized was ice, we can’t always do it — and Johns Hopkins University neuroscientists have figured out why.

Johns Hopkins Finds Training Exercise That Boosts Brain Power

One of the two brain-training methods most scientists use in research is significantly better in improving memory and attention, Johns Hopkins University researchers found. It also results in more significant changes in brain activity.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Help Show Links Between Genes, Body Tissues

Johns Hopkins University scientists are part of a research team assessing how a person’s genetic profile affects his body. The results could help show how individual genetic differences contribute to disease and guide treatments for heritable disorders such as Alzheimer’s, high cholesterol or Type I diabetes.

Mapping the Brain, Neuron by Neuron

Johns Hopkins University experts are part of an international team of scientists that has taken another step toward mapping how brains work.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Researchers to Present Their Work on Capitol Hill

Early career scientists, physicians, engineers and specialists in public health, nursing, music and marketing from Johns Hopkins University will gather on Capitol Hill in Washington to present their federally-funded research, emphasizing the importance of continuing federal support in the pursuit of new knowledge and innovation.

Can You Hear Me Now?

When trying to be heard over noise, humans and animals raise their voices. It’s a split-second feat, from ear to brain to vocalization, and Johns Hopkins University researchers are the first to measure just how fast it happens in bats: 30 milliseconds. That’s 10 times faster than the blink of an eye, a record for audio-vocal response.

New Cellular Target May Put the Brakes on Cancer’s Ability to Spread

A team led by Johns Hopkins researchers has discovered a biochemical signaling process that causes densely packed cancer cells to break away from a tumor and spread the disease elsewhere in the body.

Whose Line is it Anyway? New Hopkins Class Teaches Engineers to Think on Their Feet

Offered for the first time this semester, “Improvisation for Scientists and Engineers” uses lessons borrowed from theater classes to help such students hone their off-the-cuff verbal skills and develop poise in front of groups – valued skills in the professional world.

It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s – a Key Discovery About Human Memory

As Superman flies over the city, people on the ground famously suppose they see a bird, then a plane, and then finally realize it’s a superhero. But they haven’t just spotted the Man of Steel – they’ve experienced the ideal conditions to create a very strong memory of him.

Johns Hopkins University cognitive psychologists are the first to link human’s long-term visual memory with how things move. The key, they found, lies in whether we can visually track an object. When people see Superman, they don’t think they’re seeing a bird, a plane and a superhero. They know it’s just one thing – even though the distance, lighting and angle change how he looks.

Wanted: Self-Driving Cells to Pursue Deadly Bacteria

Drawing on their expertise in control systems and cell biology, Johns Hopkins University researchers are setting out to design and test troops of self-directed microscopic warriors that can locate and neutralize dangerous strains of bacteria.

Intersession Students Learn the Science Behind Party Food

Beer, wine and cheese are classic party foods that couldn’t be made without fermentation. Fermentation is also the key behind food trends like pickling and the tea drink kombucha. In a one-credit intersession course, Johns Hopkins University undergraduates will learn the chemistry behind this biological process, science that will help them understand when they should send back a bottle of wine, what sets a stout apart from a lager, and why some cheeses ooze while others crumble.

Captured on Video: DNA Nanotubes Build a Bridge Between Two Molecular Posts

In a microscopic feat that resembled a high-wire circus act, Johns Hopkins researchers have coaxed DNA nanotubes to assemble themselves into bridge-like structures arched between two molecular landmarks on the surface of a lab dish. The team captured examples of this unusual nanoscale performance on video.

Computing Tool Will Allow More Accurate Genome Sequencing

Scientists’ effort to piece together the genome is taking a significant step forward with a new computerized method that creates more complete and detailed versions of the complex puzzle of life than have ever been produced before.

Kill Them With Cuteness: The Adorable Thing Bats Do to Catch Prey

Bats’ use of echolocation to detect, track and catch prey is well documented. But this Johns Hopkins team is the first to show how the relatively mysterious head and ear movements factor into the hunt.

Researchers Find Brain’s ‘Physics Engine’

Whether or not they aced it in high school, human beings are physics masters when it comes to understanding and predicting how objects in the world will behave. A Johns Hopkins University cognitive scientist has found the source of that intuition, the brain’s “physics engine.”

Research Reveals Cancer Pathway to Spreading Through the Body

Cancer cells need oxygen to survive, as do most other life forms, but scientists had never tracked their search for oxygen in their early growth stages until now — a step toward deeper understanding of one way cancer spreads that could help treat the disease.

The Brain’s Super-Sensitivity to Curbs

Humans rely on boundaries like walls and curbs for navigation, and Johns Hopkins University researchers have pinpointed the areas of the brain most sensitive to even the tiniest borders.

Protein Found to Bolster Growth of Damaged Muscle Tissue

Johns Hopkins University biologists have found that a protein that plays a key role in the lives of stem cells can bolster the growth of damaged muscle tissue, a step that could potentially contribute to treatments for muscle degeneration caused by old age and diseases such as muscular dystrophy.