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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins University Hosts 11th Annual Physics Fair

The Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy will host its 11th annual Physics Fair from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 26 to coincide with the yearly Spring Fair celebration on Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus, 3400 N. Charles St. in Baltimore.

Cosmic Inflation Finding First Predicted by Johns Hopkins Cosmologist

A team of observational cosmologists may have found evidence that cosmic inflation occurred a fraction of a second after the Big Bang, a point predicted 18 years ago by Johns Hopkins University cosmologist and theoretical physicist Marc Kamionkowski.

Three Johns Hopkins Researchers Selected for Sloan Research Fellowship

A theoretical physicist, a computer scientist and a solid-state chemist at the Johns Hopkins University are 2014 recipients of the Sloan Research Fellowship, given annually to young scientists showing promise in their research areas.

Johns Hopkins University Researcher Wins 2014 Pierce Prize for Astronomical Excellence

Nadia L. Zakamska of the Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University has been awarded the 2014 Newton Lacy Pierce Prize for outstanding achievement in observational astronomical research.

MEDIA ADVISORY: JHU Expert Available to Speak on Comet ISON Grazing Sun

Stephan McCandliss, principal investigator on one of the NASA missions studying Comet ISON as it nears death or destiny, is available to comment about the comet, what it means to scientists and what we can learn from its Thanksgiving date with the sun.

FORTIS Takes Flight on Mission to Analyze Comet ISON

The adage “if at first you don’t succeed, try, try again” is apt advice in a host of life’s challenges but none more timely than the launch of FORTIS, a NASA-funded sounding rocket, that took flight before dawn on November 20 from a New Mexican desert.

JHU Astronomer Awarded $9.5 Million to Create “Virtual Telescope” to Observe Scientific Data

A team of scientists at The Johns Hopkins University has received a grant for $9.5 million over five years to develop, build and maintain large-scale data sets that will allow for greater access and better usability of the information for the science community.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins University Physicist Available to Comment on the Higgs Boson

Johns Hopkins University experimental physicist and associate professor Andrei Gritsan is available to comment on the selection of Francois Englert and Peter Higgs as the 2013 Nobel Prize winners in Physics for their work on the Higgs boson.

Johns Hopkins Physicists Play Critical Role in Higgs Boson Discovery

Johns Hopkins University physicists today are celebrating the important role they played in the discovery of a Higgs boson, the so-called “God particle” whose existence was predicted almost 50 years ago by Université Libre de Bruxelles’ Francois Englert and University of Edinburgh’s Peter Higgs, winners of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics.

JHU Physicist-Produced Documentary to Appear in New York Film Festival

The temperature is heating up for Particle Fever, a documentary produced by Johns Hopkins University professor David Kaplan that highlights the construction of one of the most audacious ventures in modern science. The film will be screened on Sept. 29 and Oct. 2 at the New York Film Festival, one of the most prestigious in the country.

Johns Hopkins Physicists Receive $1.3 Million Grant to Study the Early Universe

Three Johns Hopkins University theoretical physicists have received a $1.3 million grant from the John Templeton Foundation to develop new ideas for the origin of the universe and alternative ways to test those ideas. The grant, awarded last month, will also be used to support a post-doctoral program for young scientists in theoretical research as well as to create a visitors program to bring notable scientists in the field to the university to collaborate with researchers.

Johns Hopkins Astrophysicist Charles L. Bennett Receives 2013 Jansky Prize

Johns Hopkins University astrophysicist Charles L. Bennett has been selected to receive the 2013 Jansky Prize for his leadership in the establishment of precision cosmology through studies of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation.

Johns Hopkins Researcher, Colleagues, Solve Mystery of X-ray Light Coming From Black Holes

It is a mystery that has stymied astrophysicists for decades: how do black holes produce so many high-power X-rays? In a new study, astrophysicists from The Johns Hopkins University, NASA and the Rochester Institute of Technology conducted research that bridges the gap between theory and observation by demonstrating that gas spiraling toward a black hole inevitably results in X-ray emissions.

Tiny Bubbles in Your Metallic Glass May Not Be a Cause for Celebration

Bubbles in a champagne glass may add a festive fizz to the drink, but microscopic bubbles that form in a material called metallic glass can signal serious trouble. In this normally high-strength material, bubbles may indicate that a brittle breakdown is in progress. That’s why Johns Hopkins researchers used computer simulations to study how these bubbles form and expand when a piece of metallic glass is pulled outward by negative pressure, such as the suction produced by a vacuum.

Researchers Explain Magnetic Field Misbehavior in Solar Flares: The Culprit is Turbulence

When a solar flare filled with charged particles erupts from the sun, its magnetic fields sometime break a widely accepted rule of physics. The flux-freezing theorem dictates that the magnetic lines of force should flow away in lock-step with the particles, whole and unbroken. Instead, the lines sometimes break apart and quickly reconnect in a way that has mystified astrophysicists. But in a paper published in the May 23 issue of the journal Nature, an interdisciplinary research team led by a Johns Hopkins mathematical physicist says it has found a key to the mystery.

Johns Hopkins team uses Hubble in record-breaking search for farthest supernova

A team of astronomers at The Johns Hopkins University has used data gathered by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope to spot a supernova that exploded more than 10 billion years ago, breaking the previous record by roughly 350 million years. Nicknamed in a nod to Woodrow Wilson, the 28th president of the United States and a Johns Hopkins alumnus, “SN Wilson” now stands as the farthest known supernova of the type used to measure cosmic distances.

Johns Hopkins University’s Annual Physics Fair is Saturday, April 13

The Department of Physics and Astronomy at The Johns Hopkins University is hosting its 10th annual Physics Fair from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 13, coinciding with the annual Spring Fair celebration on the Homewood campus, 3400 N. Charles St. in Baltimore. Events will take place in the Bloomberg Center for Physics and Astronomy, located on the north end of the campus near Homewood Field.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Higgs boson news – Johns Hopkins expert available

The announcement that researchers are closer than ever to confirming the existence of the Standard Model Higgs boson particle was made possible in part by contributions from physicists at The Johns Hopkins University who are members of one of two teams conducting experiments at the Large Hadron Collider.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Asteroid flyby on Friday, Feb. 15

As asteroid 2012 DA14 squeaks by Earth, professors at The Johns Hopkins University are available to discuss what we can do to prepare for – or even prevent – such close encounters in the future.

Johns Hopkins Astrophysicists Join Space Mission Aimed at Solving ‘Dark’ Mysteries of the Universe

Johns Hopkins astrophysicists Brice Ménard and Charles L. Bennett have been appointed to the Euclid Consortium, the international team of scientists overseeing an ambitious space telescope project designed to probe the mysteries of dark energy and dark matter. NASA, a partner in the mission, recently announced their selection to the research team for Euclid.

WMAP Team Releases Final Results, Based on Nine Years of Observations

ince its launch in 2001, the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) space mission has revolutionized our view of the universe, establishing a cosmological model that explains a widely diverse collection of astronomical observations. Led by Johns Hopkins astrophysicist Charles L. Bennett, the WMAP science team has determined, to a high degree of accuracy and precision, not only the age of the universe, but also the density of atoms; the density of all other non-atomic matter; the epoch when the first stars started to shine; the “lumpiness” of the universe, and how that “lumpiness” depends on scale size. Now, two years after the probe “retired,” Bennett and the WMAP science team are releasing its final results, based on a full nine years of observations.

JHU Physicist Inaugural Winner of 2012 Prize of the Asian Union of Magnetics Societies

Chia-Ling Chien, the Jacob L. Hain Professor of Physics and the Director of the Material Research Science and Engineering Center at The Johns Hopkins University, is a winner of the first-ever Asian Union of Magnetic Societies Award, recognizing his “seminal contribution to magnetic materials, nanostructures, magnetoelectronic phenomena and devices.”

JHU’s Ménard named “Maryland’s Outstanding Young Scientist of 2012” by the Maryland Academy of Sciences

Astrophysicist Brice Ménard of the Johns Hopkins University has been selected by the Maryland Academy of Sciences as the Outstanding Young Scientist of 2012. He received the award at a ceremony to be held at the Maryland Science Center yesterday. Ménard, an assistant professor in the Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy, was recognized for his research in extragalactic astrophysics and cosmology.

Johns Hopkins Chemist Wins Packard Fellowship

Johns Hopkins University chemist Tyrel McQueen has been awarded a 2012 David and Lucile Packard Foundation Fellowship for Science and Engineering. The fellowship is one of 16 awarded each year nationwide, and bestows unrestricted funds of $875,000 (over a five-year period) to unusually creative young faculty members in science and engineering.

JHU Cosmologists Receive “New Frontiers” Award for Work on “Origami Universe”

Two Johns Hopkins University research scientists who use the Japanese art of paper folding, known as origami, as a metaphor for understanding the complexity of the cosmos have been named winners of an award through the “New Frontiers in Astronomy & Cosmology International Grant and Essay Writing Competition,” funded by the John Templeton Foundation. Mark Neyrinck and Miguel Aragón-Calvo, both of the Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy at the Johns Hopkins University’s Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, were chosen from an international competition led by the University of Chicago’s Donald G. York to receive a grant to explore fundamental questions in astronomy and cosmology that engage groundbreaking ideas on the nature of the universe

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