About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Did Gravitational Wave Detector Find Dark Matter?

When an astronomical observatory in the United States this winter detected a whisper of two black holes colliding in deep space, scientists celebrated a successful effort to confirm Albert Einstein’s prediction of gravitational waves. A team of Johns Hopkins University astrophysicists wondered about something else: Had the experiment found the “dark matter” that makes up most of the mass of the universe?

Universe Expanding Faster Than Scientists Predicted

The universe appears to be expanding faster now than predicted by measurements of the rate as seen shortly after the Big Bang, a study led by a Johns Hopkins University scientist has found.

Telescope Peering into Origins of the Universe Receives “First Light”

High in the Andes Mountains of northern Chile a unique Johns Hopkins University observatory has just achieved “first light,” the first time the telescope has collected radiation from space.

Johns Hopkins Faculty Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Four Johns Hopkins University faculty members are among the new scholars elected to the National Academy of Sciences today in recognition of their “distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.”

Johns Hopkins Researchers Aim for Safer, More Efficient Rocket Engines

The U.S. Air Force has awarded two contracts totaling $1.48 million to the Energetics Research Group, based within Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering, to help set the stage for the next generation of U.S.-made rocket engines. The funding will be used to reduce risks associated with new technologies that may replace the Russian-made RD-180 engine.

Johns Hopkins Physics Fair Returns to Homewood Campus

Scientists will reveal invisible forces in the universe, students will compete for prizes and balloon rockets will be launched as the Johns Hopkins University’s Department of Physics and Astronomy holds its 13th Annual Physics Fair on Saturday, April 16 on the Homewood campus, 3400 N. Charles St. in Baltimore.

New Research Shows Quasars Slowed Star Formation

Research led by Johns Hopkins University scientists has found new persuasive evidence that could help solve a long-standing mystery in astrophysics: why did the pace of star formation in the universe slow down some 11 billion years ago?

Johns Hopkins Rocketeers Launch Their Most Sensitive Instrument Yet

Rocketeers led by Johns Hopkins University astrophysicist Stephan R. McCandliss just launched the most sensitive instrument they’ve ever used to explore outer space, seeking clues to how galaxies grow with the birth of new stars, and how they stop growing.

Scientists Get First Glimpse of Black Hole Eating Star, Ejecting High-Speed Flare

An international team of astrophysicists led by a Johns Hopkins University scientist has for the first time witnessed a black hole swallowing a star and ejecting a flare of matter moving at nearly the speed of light.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Club to Dedicate Room to University’s Nobel Laureates

The Johns Hopkins Club is opening its new Nobel Room, dedicated to the 36 Johns Hopkins university faculty members, graduates and other affiliates who have won Nobel Prizes.

Johns Hopkins research on Infant Universe Takes Step Forward

An effort to peer into the origins of the universe with the most effective instrument ever used in the effort is taking a big step forward, as Johns Hopkins University scientists begin shipping a two-story-tall microwave telescope to its base in Chile.

Pieces of the Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor [CLASS] telescope will soon be packed in two 40-foot containers and sent south, as scientists get closer to taking observations of a faint, ancient electromagnetic energy that pervades the sky, holding clues about how the universe began.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Expert Available to Discuss Report on Martian Surface Water

Kevin Lewis, an expert on the geology and past climate of Mars at Johns Hopkins University, is available to discuss findings published today on evidence of surface water on Mars.

New Computing Center in Baltimore Will Offer Bigger Home for ‘Big Data’ Projects

Whether they’re studying distant galaxies or deadly diseases deep within human cells, Big Data researchers increasingly need more powerful computers and more digital storage space. To address this demand, two Maryland universities are preparing to open one of the nation’s largest academic high-performance computing centers, located at the edge of the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center campus in Baltimore.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Expert Available to Discuss Restart of LHC

Andrei Gritsan, a Johns Hopkins University associate professor of physics and astronomy who contributed to the discovery of the fundamental particle known as the Higgs boson, is available to discuss the restart of the Large Hadron Collider, where the Higgs boson was detected in 2012.

Johns Hopkins Astrophysicist Receives 2015 Tomassoni Chisesi Prize

Charles L. Bennett, the Alumni Centennial Professor of Physics and Astronomy and Gilman Scholar in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences at Johns Hopkins University, will receive the 2015 “Caterina Tomassoni and Felice Pietro Chisesi Prize” in June at the University of Roma “La Sapienz” in Italy.

Johns Hopkins Physics Fair Returns to Homewood Campus

The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University will host its 12th annual Physics Fair from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 25. The fair coincides with the university’s annual Spring Fair celebration on the Homewood campus.

Chia-Ling Chien Awarded 2015 IUPAP Magnetism Award and Néel Medal

Chia-Ling Chien, a condensed matter physicist at Johns Hopkins University, has received the prestigious 2015 IUPAP Magnetism Award and Néel Medal from the Commission on Magnetism within the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP).

Rare Split Images of Supernova Put Johns Hopkins Astronomer in the Spotlight

A Johns Hopkins astronomer played a key role in the recent discovery of a distant exploding star whose light split into four distinct images in a display just seen for the first time by scientists using the Hubble Space Telescope.

Ultra-Thin Nanowires Can Trap Electron ‘Twisters’ That Disrupt Superconductors

Superconductor materials are prized for their ability to carry an electric current without resistance, but this valuable trait can be crippled or lost when electrons swirl into tiny tornado-like formations called vortices. To keep supercurrents flowing at top speed, Johns Hopkins scientists have figured out how to constrain troublesome vortices by trapping them within extremely short, ultra-thin nanowires.

Johns Hopkins 1st in Research Spending for 35th Straight Year

The Johns Hopkins University led the U.S. in higher education research spending for the 35th straight year in fiscal 2013, with $2.2 billion for medical, science and engineering research, according to the National Science Foundation.

Johns Hopkins Astrophysicist Shares 2015 Dannie Heineman Prize

Johns Hopkins University’s Marc Kamionkowski is a winner of the 2015 Dannie Heineman Prize for Astrophysics, one of the top prizes in the field, the American Astronomical Society (AAS) and the American Institute of Physics (AIP) announced today. The honor, which is awarded annually to outstanding mid-career scientists, carries a cash prize of $10,000 that will be split between Kamionkowski and his co-recipient, David Spergel of Princeton University.

Map of Mysterious Molecules In Our Galaxy Sheds New Light on Century-Old Puzzle

By analyzing the light of hundreds of thousands of celestial objects, Johns Hopkins astronomers from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) have created a unique map of enigmatic molecules in our galaxy that are responsible for puzzling features in the light from stars.The map, which can be viewed at http://is.gd/dibmap , was unveiled Jan. 8 at the 225th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Seattle. “Seeing where these mysterious molecules are located is fascinating,” said Brice Ménard, a professor in the Department of Physics & Astronomy at The Johns Hopkins University.

‘Particle Fever’ Wins Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award in Journalism

David E. Kaplan, a Johns Hopkins professor, theoretical particle physicist and documentary producer, received the 2015 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award in Journalism for his contributions to the production of Particle Fever. Particle Fever was one of 14 journalistic works to receive the prestigious award in 2015.

Science News Tips from Johns Hopkins

Science news tips for reporters, including a story suggestion from Johns Hopkins Magazine on JHU and ET and another on mistletoe and cancer.

Johns Hopkins University Astrophysicist Shares $3 Million Breakthrough Prize

Adam Riess, a professor of physics and astronomy at Johns Hopkins University and a Nobel laureate, has been named a recipient of the Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics for the discovery of the acceleration of the universe. Riess received the award, the most lucrative academic prize in the world, at a ceremony in California on Sunday.