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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Love and Money: How Low-Income Dads Really Provide

Low-income fathers who might be labeled “deadbeat dads” often spend as much on their children as parents in formal child support arrangements, but they choose to give goods like food and clothing rather than cash, a Johns Hopkins-led study found.

Two Johns Hopkins Scholars Awarded Guggenheim Fellowships

Anthropologist Niloofar Haeri and Lawrence M. Principe, a historian of science and a chemist, both of Johns Hopkins University, were among 175 prominent scholars to win 2015 fellowships from The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Beverly Wendland Named Dean of Arts and Sciences

Beverly Wendland, a distinguished biologist known for dedication to undergraduate and graduate students, commitment to diversity, and advocacy for innovative teaching and liberal arts education, has been appointed dean of the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences.

Johns Hopkins University Neuroscientist to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award

 November 17, 2014 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Tracey Reeves Office: 443-997-9903 Cell: 443-986-4053 treeves@jhu.edu Michela Gallagher, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University, doesn’t just study the brain. She mentors young scientists on the importance and rewards of studying it too. Over the course of her career, Gallagher has spent almost as [...]

Can Three-Year Degrees Solve College Cost Crisis?

College costs are soaring beyond the reach of average families. Student debt has skyrocketed. But a Johns Hopkins University analysis shows a solution to these mounting concerns could be as simple as making the typical degree a three-year pursuit.

When Rulers Can’t Understand the Ruled

Johns Hopkins University political scientists wanted to know if America’s unelected officials have enough in common with the people they govern to understand them. The answer: Not really.

Most Millennial Moms Who Skip College Also Skip Marriage

Waiting until marriage to have babies is now “unusual” among less educated adults close to 30 years old, Johns Hopkins University researchers found.

Johns Hopkins Appoints Three to Bloomberg Distinguished Professorship Positions

The new appointees are Patricia H. Janak, a neuroscientist specializing in associative learning and addiction; Stephen Morgan, a sociologist with expertise in education and inequality; and Kathleen Sutcliffe, an organizational sociologist focused on organizational reliability and safety. Janak, Morgan, and Sutcliffe will begin their new roles on July 1.

Affordable Housing Linked to Children’s Intellectual Ability

It’s long been accepted – with little science to back it up – that people should spend roughly a third of their income on housing. It turns out, that’s about how much a low-income family should spend to optimize their children’s brainpower.

How the ‘Long Shadow’ of an Inner City Childhood Affects Adult Success

In a ground-breaking study, Johns Hopkins University researchers followed nearly 800 Baltimore school children for a quarter of a century, and discovered that their fates were substantially determined by the family they were born into.

U.S. Welfare Spending Up — But Help for the Neediest Down

Although the United States is spending more on welfare than ever before, most of that money is going to better-off families rather than the very poorest. That means in 2014, a family of four earning $11,925 a year likely got less aid than a same-sized family earning $47,700.

Johns Hopkins Dean Named Provost at UMass Amherst

Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels wrote to students, faculty and staff to announce the appointment of Katherine Newman, the James B. Knapp Dean of the university’s Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, as provost of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Meaning Of ‘The American Dream’ Different For Minorities, Whites

In a report published in the new issue of the journal Urban Studies, Johns Hopkins University sociologist Meredith Greif found that while homeownership can spark feelings of pride in people of any race, it’s more meaningful for minorities. But, because blacks and Latinos buy more homes in disadvantaged communities and are less likely to able to move, they ultimately tend to feel dissatisfied with their community — and potentially their purchase.

Walter White’s Biggest Crime: He’s A Bad Teacher

Walter White of “Breaking Bad” sneaks, lies and manipulates – to say nothing of dealing drugs and killing people. But his biggest crime, a Johns Hopkins University professor says, is being a really, really bad teacher. Political scientist Samuel Chambers makes a case in the spring issue of the journal Theory & Event that the true teaching talent on “Breaking Bad,” the one who could inspire and mentor the student, young Jesse Pinkman, was sociopath drug kingpin Gustavo Fring.

Escaping Poor Neighborhoods Can Change A Parent’s Expectations

Despite evidence that people don’t leave impoverished, segregated areas even when offered large housing subsidies, a well-structured voucher program can help inner city residents feel comfortable enough in a more affluent area to want to stay, researchers found.

Johns Hopkins Senior Anna Wherry Wins Marshall Scholarship

The 21-year-old, who is double majoring in public health in public health and anthropology, is one of 34 students chosen from the United States for the scholarship. She will enroll in Oxford University’s refugee and forced migration studies program and also pursue a masters in social anthropology from the University of Edinburgh.

Johns Hopkins Project Aims to help Mid-Atlantic combat Hurricanes, Heat Waves

The National Science Foundation has awarded Seth Guikema, a Johns Hopkins University assistant professor of geography and environmental engineering, a $3 million grant to build a program that will determine the effect of repeated hurricanes and heat waves on the Mid-Atlantic region and suggest ways to improve the region’s ability to withstand them.

MEDIA ADVISORY: 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington

Lester K. Spence, an expert in racial politics and American political thought, sociologist Katrina Bell McDonald, civil rights historian Nathan Connolly and historian Ronald Walters can discuss the impact of the March on Washington and its modern relevance on its 50th anniversary.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Horse meat scandal in Europe

Two professors at The Johns Hopkins University are available to discuss the horse meat incident. They say a culinary taboo is a distraction from the real issue: inadequate food inspection regulations.

Critical tradeoffs between dwelling size, neighborhood for Baltimore’s low-income families

For the working poor, making housing decisions based on the old real estate adage “location, location, location” is complicated: Should a family choose cramped quarters in a safer but more expensive neighborhood, or would it be better to have a bigger apartment where rent is low but crime rates are high? When faced with difficulties finding affordable housing to accommodate their families, 124 mothers and grandmothers in Baltimore participating in a housing study often opted for a bigger apartment in a less desirable location because extra bedrooms would mean higher rental rates in safer neighborhoods in the city or surrounding counties, according to sociologists at The Johns Hopkins University and Loyola University Chicago.

Johns Hopkins Receives $7.4 Million Grant to Boost STEM Education in Baltimore City

Supported by a five-year $7.4 million National Science Foundation grant, experts at The Johns Hopkins University are partnering with teachers and administrators in Baltimore City Public Schools on a program to enhance teaching and learning in science, technology, engineering and math in city elementary schools by making STEM a community affair. The program, called STEM Achievement in Baltimore Elementary Schools – SABES for short — not only will benefit more than 1,600 students in grades three through five in nine city elementary schools, but could also become a national model for science, technology, engineering and math education.

Children of immigrants are coming out ahead of their peers

Children of immigrants are outperforming children whose family trees have deeper roots in the United States, learning more in school and then making smoother transitions into adulthood, according to sociologists at The Johns Hopkins University.

Citizen Science: Johns Hopkins Study Allows Thousands to Test Gut Sense for Numbers

A first-of-its kind study using the World Wide Web to collect data from more than 10,000 study subjects ages 11 to 85 found that humans’ inborn “number sense” improves during school years, declines during old age, and remains linked throughout the entire lifespan to academic mathematics achievement. The study, led by psychologist Justin Halberda of The Johns Hopkins University and published in the online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences during the week of June 25, is groundbreaking for presenting a picture of how our basic cognitive abilities may change across our lifetime.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Expert Available for Interviews Regarding Casino Games

If your story concerns casino games, particularly poker, computer scientist Avi Rubin is available to comment. Rubin, technical director of the Johns Hopkins University Information Security Institute, led a research team that discovered that hackers could easily tamper with the touchscreen voting machines used widely in the United States. More recently, he has studied the security of electronic medical records. In his spare time, Rubin is an avid poker player.

When Pomp and Circumstance Collide: College Graduates and the March Back Home

This month, thousands of college graduates are walking across the stage to shake hands, smile for the camera, and pick up their diplomas. Many of those newly minted American college graduates are moving out of their dorm rooms and back into their childhood bedrooms, according to Johns Hopkins University sociologist Katherine Newman, author of “The Accordion Family: Boomerang Kids, Anxious Parents, and the Private Toll of Global Competition” (Beacon Press, January 2012).