About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available

Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available.

Report: An ‘F’ Grade for the Nation’s Initial Three-Year Degree Programs

More schools are offering three-year degrees to counter the ever-skyrocketing costs of a college education but a new Johns Hopkins University analysis finds these new programs are failing students.

How Recent Economy Kept Black, White Young Adults From Leaving Nest

The economically tumultuous last decade convinced many young people to keep living with their parents, but the reasons why differ starkly by race, concludes a new Johns Hopkins University-led study.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Symposium to Explore Black Marriage

The symposium will explore contemporary black marriage across legal, political, cultural, social, economic, and historical contexts. It brings together an interdisciplinary group of scholars, practitioners, and policymakers who will address the current state of black intimate relationships in all of forms and orientations.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Conference to Explore Race, Segregation and Inequality

Race & Inequality in America: The Kerner Commission at 50. A conference featuring dozens of scholars and experts exploring race, segregation, and inequality 50 years after the release of the historic Kerner Commission Report.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Leaders to Address Issues Facing Cities

Leaders representing about 45 U.S. cities and urban scholars will convene to discuss new research on critical issues for metro areas during the 21st Century Neighborhoods: Research. Leadership. Transformation symposium, sponsored by Johns Hopkins University’s 21st Century Cities Initiative.

Advisory: JHU Experts Can Discuss Race, Political movements, Inequality

The following Johns Hopkins University experts — political scientists, economists, historians and sociologists — are available for interviews on topics of race, inequality and political movements:

MEDIA ADVISORY: How a ‘rock-paper-scissors’ game led to Charlottesville

Johns Hopkins historian N.D.B. Connolly says last weekend’s white nationalist demonstration in Charlottesville, Virginia, has made it clear that “generic solutions” to this county’s racial problem do not work. For too long, he says, discrimination and equality in the United States have operated “like an oversized historical game of paper-rock-scissors.”

Johns Hopkins Launches Effort to Improve Civic Engagement

The Stavros Niarchos Foundation has committed $150 million to Johns Hopkins University to forge new ways to address the deterioration of civic engagement worldwide.

Study: Black and White Kids Faring Equally in Subsidized Housing

Once-formidable disparities between black and white families living in subsidized housing have largely vanished, and black and white children who grew up in such housing fared similarly in school, jobs and earnings, finds a new Johns Hopkins University study. However, one troubling difference remains between black and white families in assisted housing — neighborhood quality. Black families getting subsidized housing are about nine time more likely than whites to live in segregated, impoverished neighborhoods, the study found.

When Women’s Health Improves, Domestic Violence Diminishes

Chronically ill, low-income women who thought they were dying, experienced a sharp reduction in domestic violence after getting access to a life-saving treatment, a Johns Hopkins University-led study found.

Teens in Poorest Families Go Hungry More Than Younger Kids

In very poor families, teenagers are going hungry twice as often as their younger siblings, a new Johns Hopkins University study finds.

Subsidized Housing Works Better for Some Kids Than Others

Living in subsidized housing seems to give a boost to children with high standardized test scores and few behavior problems, but it has the opposite effect on students who score poorly and have behavioral issues, a new study finds.

For-Profit Trade Schools Prove Costly for Disadvantaged Black Youth

Young African-Americans from some of the country’s most disadvantaged neighborhoods are drawn to for-profit post-secondary trade schools, believing they are the quickest route to jobs. But a new study co-authored by a Johns Hopkins University sociologist finds the very thing that makes for-profit schools seem so appealing — a streamlined curriculum — is the reason so many poor students drop out.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Experts Available to Discuss Election Topics

The following Johns Hopkins University experts, whose research focuses on such subjects as race, economic policy, inequality, gun violence, law enforcement and health care, are available for interviews during the presidential election season.

Income Inequality Leads Millennials to Start Families Before Marriage

Rising income inequality, and the resulting scarcity of certain types of jobs, is a key reason a growing number of young Americans are having babies before getting married.

Johns Hopkins Faculty Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Four Johns Hopkins University faculty members are among the new scholars elected to the National Academy of Sciences today in recognition of their “distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.”

Tax Prep Chains Target Low-Income Workers

National tax preparation chains continue to exploit the working poor, many of whom spend a significant portion of a key federal anti-poverty tax credit just to pay for filing their taxes, a new study concludes.

Race Biases Teachers’ Expectations for Students

When evaluating the same black student, white teachers expect significantly less academic success than black teachers, a new Johns Hopkins University study concludes. This is especially true for black boys.

Baltimore Series to Explore Roots and Realities of Discrimination

A year after the unrest in Baltimore sparked by the arrest and tragic death of Freddie Gray, Johns Hopkins University is launching an art and conversation series to reflect on deep-rooted discrimination in the city and what the community can do about it.

Evidence of a ‘Ferguson Effect’ on Baltimore Arrests Before Unrest

A “Ferguson effect” likely decelerated arrests in Baltimore well before the April 2015 unrest related to the arrest and death of Freddie Gray, but there is little evidence to suggest it influenced the city’s crime rate, a new report concludes.

Department of Labor Official Joins 21st Century Cities Initiative

Ben Seigel, a Baltimore native who helped design the Obama Administration’s place-based strategy and led the federal government’s effort to address deep-rooted issues in Baltimore after last year’s unrest, has joined a Johns Hopkins University project to strengthen cities with similar urban challenges.

Johns Hopkins Researchers’ Career-Long Study Wins Top Education Prize

Three Johns Hopkins University researchers whose 2014 book traced the lives of nearly 800 Baltimore City public school students for a quarter of a century have won the prestigious $100,000 Grawemeyer Award in Education.

If You Made Money Buying a 1st Home in the 2000s, You Probably Weren’t Black

In a study recently published in the journal Real Estate Economics, public policy professor Sandra J. Newman and researcher C. Scott Holupka found that race was a key determinate of which low and moderate-income people who bought first homes during the decade made money. During the Great Recession, white homebuyers lost money but black ones lost considerably more. Even during the boom years, when white buyers increased their wealth by 50 percent, black buyers lost 47 percent of their wealth.