About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Experts Available to Discuss Election Topics

The following Johns Hopkins University experts, whose research focuses on such subjects as race, economic policy, inequality, gun violence, law enforcement and health care, are available for interviews during the presidential election season.

Income Inequality Leads Millennials to Start Families Before Marriage

Rising income inequality, and the resulting scarcity of certain types of jobs, is a key reason a growing number of young Americans are having babies before getting married.

Johns Hopkins Faculty Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Four Johns Hopkins University faculty members are among the new scholars elected to the National Academy of Sciences today in recognition of their “distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.”

Tax Prep Chains Target Low-Income Workers

National tax preparation chains continue to exploit the working poor, many of whom spend a significant portion of a key federal anti-poverty tax credit just to pay for filing their taxes, a new study concludes.

Race Biases Teachers’ Expectations for Students

When evaluating the same black student, white teachers expect significantly less academic success than black teachers, a new Johns Hopkins University study concludes. This is especially true for black boys.

Baltimore Series to Explore Roots and Realities of Discrimination

A year after the unrest in Baltimore sparked by the arrest and tragic death of Freddie Gray, Johns Hopkins University is launching an art and conversation series to reflect on deep-rooted discrimination in the city and what the community can do about it.

Evidence of a ‘Ferguson Effect’ on Baltimore Arrests Before Unrest

A “Ferguson effect” likely decelerated arrests in Baltimore well before the April 2015 unrest related to the arrest and death of Freddie Gray, but there is little evidence to suggest it influenced the city’s crime rate, a new report concludes.

Department of Labor Official Joins 21st Century Cities Initiative

Ben Seigel, a Baltimore native who helped design the Obama Administration’s place-based strategy and led the federal government’s effort to address deep-rooted issues in Baltimore after last year’s unrest, has joined a Johns Hopkins University project to strengthen cities with similar urban challenges.

Johns Hopkins Researchers’ Career-Long Study Wins Top Education Prize

Three Johns Hopkins University researchers whose 2014 book traced the lives of nearly 800 Baltimore City public school students for a quarter of a century have won the prestigious $100,000 Grawemeyer Award in Education.

If You Made Money Buying a 1st Home in the 2000s, You Probably Weren’t Black

In a study recently published in the journal Real Estate Economics, public policy professor Sandra J. Newman and researcher C. Scott Holupka found that race was a key determinate of which low and moderate-income people who bought first homes during the decade made money. During the Great Recession, white homebuyers lost money but black ones lost considerably more. Even during the boom years, when white buyers increased their wealth by 50 percent, black buyers lost 47 percent of their wealth.

Neighbors But Not Classmates

Contrary to assumptions that disadvantaged neighborhoods trap children in failing schools, a Johns Hopkins University sociologist has found the opposite to be true: as a neighborhood’s income decreases, its range of educational experiences greatly expands.

Love and Money: How Low-Income Dads Really Provide

Low-income fathers who might be labeled “deadbeat dads” often spend as much on their children as parents in formal child support arrangements, but they choose to give goods like food and clothing rather than cash, a Johns Hopkins-led study found.

Two Johns Hopkins Scholars Awarded Guggenheim Fellowships

Anthropologist Niloofar Haeri and Lawrence M. Principe, a historian of science and a chemist, both of Johns Hopkins University, were among 175 prominent scholars to win 2015 fellowships from The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Beverly Wendland Named Dean of Arts and Sciences

Beverly Wendland, a distinguished biologist known for dedication to undergraduate and graduate students, commitment to diversity, and advocacy for innovative teaching and liberal arts education, has been appointed dean of the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences.

Johns Hopkins University Neuroscientist to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award

 November 17, 2014 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Tracey Reeves Office: 443-997-9903 Cell: 443-986-4053 treeves@jhu.edu Michela Gallagher, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University, doesn’t just study the brain. She mentors young scientists on the importance and rewards of studying it too. Over the course of her career, Gallagher has spent almost as […]

Can Three-Year Degrees Solve College Cost Crisis?

College costs are soaring beyond the reach of average families. Student debt has skyrocketed. But a Johns Hopkins University analysis shows a solution to these mounting concerns could be as simple as making the typical degree a three-year pursuit.

When Rulers Can’t Understand the Ruled

Johns Hopkins University political scientists wanted to know if America’s unelected officials have enough in common with the people they govern to understand them. The answer: Not really.

Most Millennial Moms Who Skip College Also Skip Marriage

Waiting until marriage to have babies is now “unusual” among less educated adults close to 30 years old, Johns Hopkins University researchers found.

Johns Hopkins Appoints Three to Bloomberg Distinguished Professorship Positions

The new appointees are Patricia H. Janak, a neuroscientist specializing in associative learning and addiction; Stephen Morgan, a sociologist with expertise in education and inequality; and Kathleen Sutcliffe, an organizational sociologist focused on organizational reliability and safety. Janak, Morgan, and Sutcliffe will begin their new roles on July 1.

Affordable Housing Linked to Children’s Intellectual Ability

It’s long been accepted – with little science to back it up – that people should spend roughly a third of their income on housing. It turns out, that’s about how much a low-income family should spend to optimize their children’s brainpower.

How the ‘Long Shadow’ of an Inner City Childhood Affects Adult Success

In a ground-breaking study, Johns Hopkins University researchers followed nearly 800 Baltimore school children for a quarter of a century, and discovered that their fates were substantially determined by the family they were born into.

U.S. Welfare Spending Up — But Help for the Neediest Down

Although the United States is spending more on welfare than ever before, most of that money is going to better-off families rather than the very poorest. That means in 2014, a family of four earning $11,925 a year likely got less aid than a same-sized family earning $47,700.

Johns Hopkins Dean Named Provost at UMass Amherst

Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels wrote to students, faculty and staff to announce the appointment of Katherine Newman, the James B. Knapp Dean of the university’s Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, as provost of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Meaning Of ‘The American Dream’ Different For Minorities, Whites

In a report published in the new issue of the journal Urban Studies, Johns Hopkins University sociologist Meredith Greif found that while homeownership can spark feelings of pride in people of any race, it’s more meaningful for minorities. But, because blacks and Latinos buy more homes in disadvantaged communities and are less likely to able to move, they ultimately tend to feel dissatisfied with their community — and potentially their purchase.