About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Scientists Use Satellites, Population Data to Build Malaria Early Warning System

A Johns Hopkins University scientist is part of a team working on a method to predict malaria outbreaks months in advance, potentially giving public health officials a chance to protect people from a disease that poses a risk to nearly half the world’s population and kills hundreds of thousands a year.

Media Advisory: Is Your Personal Data Safe from a ‘Krack Attack’?

Two widely respected Johns Hopkins University scholars are available to talk to members of the news media about how serious the Wi-Fi flaw is, which equipment is most at risk and how users can protect themselves.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Win Grant for Machine Language Translation

A team of computer scientists at Johns Hopkins University has won a $10.7 million grant from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence to create an information retrieval and translation system for languages that are not widely used around the world.

JHU Undergrads’ ‘Nasal Relief’ Team Named Finalist in Collegiate Inventors Competition

A Johns Hopkins student team that wants to help people breathe easier has scored a coveted finalist spot in the 2017 Collegiate Inventors Competition, organizers of the event have announced. The students devised a simple, discreet device to open obstructed nostrils, a common problem that can cause snoring and other sleep disruptions, as well as exercising difficulties.

DNA Triggers Shape-Shifting in Hydrogels, Opening a New Way to Make ‘Soft Robots’

Biochemical engineers at Johns Hopkins University have used sequences of DNA molecules to induce shape-changing in water-based gels, demonstrating a new tactic to produce soft robots and “smart” medical devices that do not rely on cumbersome wires, batteries or tethers.

Media Advisory: Hundreds of College Students to Gather at Johns Hopkins for Weekend of HopHacks

More than 300 graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University for the latest HopHacks, a marathon session challenging students to realize their best software and hardware ideas and compete for cash and other sponsored prizes.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Develop Super-strong Metal for Next Tech Frontier

The technological future of everything from cars and jet engines to oil rigs, along with the gadgets, appliances and public utilities comprising the Internet of Things will depend on microscopic sensors.

Trouble is these sensors are mostly made of the material silicon, which has its limits. Johns Hopkins University materials scientist and mechanical engineer Kevin J. Hemker has led a team that is now reporting success in developing a new material that promises to help ensure that these sensors, also known as microelectromechanical systems [MEMS], can continue to meet the demands of the next technological frontier.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Lights Out! Weak Networks Put Power Grids at Risk

The startling vulnerability of the world’s power grid systems does not surprise Yair Amir, a professor and chair of the Department of Computer Science in the Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Researchers to Present Their Work on Capitol Hill

Early career scientists, physicians, engineers and specialists in public health, nursing, music and marketing from Johns Hopkins University will gather on Capitol Hill in Washington to present their federally-funded research, emphasizing the importance of continuing federal support in the pursuit of new knowledge and innovation.

Whose Line is it Anyway? New Hopkins Class Teaches Engineers to Think on Their Feet

Offered for the first time this semester, “Improvisation for Scientists and Engineers” uses lessons borrowed from theater classes to help such students hone their off-the-cuff verbal skills and develop poise in front of groups – valued skills in the professional world.

Media Advisory: Astronaut Kate Rubins to Speak at Johns Hopkins University

Kate Rubins, the first person to sequence DNA in space aboard the International Space Station last year, will talk about her work as a scientist and astronaut.

Nine Johns Hopkins Engineers Named AIMBE Fellows

Nine faculty members from The Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering have been named Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

New Gene Sequencing Software Could Aid in Early Detection, Treatment of Cancer

A research team from the United States and Canada has developed and successfully tested new computational software that determines whether a human DNA sample includes an epigenetic add-on linked to cancer and other adverse health conditions.

Media Advisory: Hundreds of College Students to Convene at JHU for Weekend of HopHacks

Graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University for the latest HopHacks, a marathon session challenging students to realize their best software and hardware ideas and compete for cash and other sponsored prizes.

52 Baltimore City School Teams to Compete in Robotics Contest at Johns Hopkins

On Saturday, Feb. 4, more than 200 middle and high school students from Baltimore City Public Schools will compete in the Hopkins Robotics Cup, the Baltimore City VEX and VEX IQ Robotics League championship event. This engineering challenge, which changes every year, is presented in the form of a game.

Wanted: Self-Driving Cells to Pursue Deadly Bacteria

Drawing on their expertise in control systems and cell biology, Johns Hopkins University researchers are setting out to design and test troops of self-directed microscopic warriors that can locate and neutralize dangerous strains of bacteria.

MEDIA ADVISORY: What Happens When Hackers Hijack Our Smart Devices?

In a recent segment on NPR’s TED Radio Hour, Johns Hopkins cybersecurity expert Avi Rubin warned that our increasing reliance on Internet-connected add-ons to our home appliances and vehicles could yield unwelcome consequences.

Captured on Video: DNA Nanotubes Build a Bridge Between Two Molecular Posts

In a microscopic feat that resembled a high-wire circus act, Johns Hopkins researchers have coaxed DNA nanotubes to assemble themselves into bridge-like structures arched between two molecular landmarks on the surface of a lab dish. The team captured examples of this unusual nanoscale performance on video.

New Bioinformatics Tool Tests Methods for Finding Mutant Genes That ‘Drive’ Cancer

Among the numerous new tactics that aim to spotlight the so-called cancer driver genes, which produce the most accurate results? To help solve this puzzle, a team of Johns Hopkins computational scientists and cancer experts have devised their own bioinformatics software to evaluate how well the current strategies identify cancer-promoting mutations and distinguish them from benign mutations in cancer cells.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Students Will Use Mousetrap and Rubber Band Power to Launch Blue Jay Beanie Babies

Johns Hopkins Freshman Engineering Contest Allows No Batteries or Other Electronics
WHEN: 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 7.

WHERE: On stage in the Shriver Hall Auditorium on The Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, Md.

Multi-Million-Dollar Research Effort Aims to Cripple Cancer’s Deadly Ability to Spread

Supported by a $9-million grant from the National Cancer Institute, a diverse team led by Johns Hopkins researchers has begun looking for new ways to attack one of the scariest traits of this disease: its frequent refusal to stay in one place.

Light Tames Lethal Heart Disorders in Mice and Virtual Humans

Using high-tech human heart models and mouse experiments, scientists at Johns Hopkins and Germany’s University of Bonn have shown that beams of light could replace electric shocks in patients reeling from a deadly heart rhythm disorder. The findings, published online Sept. 12 in the October 2016 edition of The Journal of Clinical Investigation, could pave the way for a new type of implantable defibrillators.

Online Master’s Degree in Data Science Now Offered at Johns Hopkins

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals, the division of Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering that offers online and part-time graduate programs, has launched a new master’s degree program in data science that students can complete online.

MIT Technology Review Honors Johns Hopkins Engineer as a Top Young Innovator

Muyinatu A. Lediju Bell, a Johns Hopkins engineering professor who designs medical imaging systems that link light, sound and robotics to produce clearer pictures, was honored today by MIT Technology Review, which placed her on its prestigious 2016 list of 35 Innovators Under 35. The list annually spotlights the nation’s most promising young scientists.

Cyber Security Experts to Discuss Attack Defense, Response

How do hackers crack a computer system and steal data? How should organizations protect themselves? How should they prepare for and respond to attack? These are among the questions that will be addressed by experts in the field at the third annual Senior Executive Cyber Security Conference to be held Wednesday, Sept. 21 at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.