About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

New Cellular Target May Put the Brakes on Cancer’s Ability to Spread

A team led by Johns Hopkins researchers has discovered a biochemical signaling process that causes densely packed cancer cells to break away from a tumor and spread the disease elsewhere in the body.

Media Advisory: Astronaut Kate Rubins to Speak at Johns Hopkins University

Kate Rubins, the first person to sequence DNA in space aboard the International Space Station last year, will talk about her work as a scientist and astronaut.

Nine Johns Hopkins Engineers Named AIMBE Fellows

Nine faculty members from The Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering have been named Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

New Gene Sequencing Software Could Aid in Early Detection, Treatment of Cancer

A research team from the United States and Canada has developed and successfully tested new computational software that determines whether a human DNA sample includes an epigenetic add-on linked to cancer and other adverse health conditions.

Wanted: Self-Driving Cells to Pursue Deadly Bacteria

Drawing on their expertise in control systems and cell biology, Johns Hopkins University researchers are setting out to design and test troops of self-directed microscopic warriors that can locate and neutralize dangerous strains of bacteria.

Study Identifies Molecular Signal for Maintaining Adult Neuron

Research led by a Johns Hopkins University biologist sheds light on the subject, potentially pointing the way to a better understanding of how the structure of nerve cells in the adult hippocampus may deteriorate, which can lead to Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders.

Intersession Students Learn the Science Behind Party Food

Beer, wine and cheese are classic party foods that couldn’t be made without fermentation. Fermentation is also the key behind food trends like pickling and the tea drink kombucha. In a one-credit intersession course, Johns Hopkins University undergraduates will learn the chemistry behind this biological process, science that will help them understand when they should send back a bottle of wine, what sets a stout apart from a lager, and why some cheeses ooze while others crumble.

Captured on Video: DNA Nanotubes Build a Bridge Between Two Molecular Posts

In a microscopic feat that resembled a high-wire circus act, Johns Hopkins researchers have coaxed DNA nanotubes to assemble themselves into bridge-like structures arched between two molecular landmarks on the surface of a lab dish. The team captured examples of this unusual nanoscale performance on video.

Research Shows Nerve Growth Protein Controls Blood Sugar

Research led by a Johns Hopkins University biologist demonstrates the workings of a biochemical pathway that helps control glucose in the bloodstream, a development that could potentially lead to treatments for diabetes.

When Fish Come to School, Kids Get Hooked on Science

A program that brings live fish into classrooms to teach the fundamentals of biology not only helps students learn, but improves their attitudes about science, a new study finds.

Mouse Tests Aim to Show How Genes and Environment Join Forces to Cause Disease

When researchers try to uncover the cause of disease, they commonly start with two questions: Did a quirk in the patient’s genes open the door to illness? Did exposure to environmental factors play havoc with the patient’s health? Very often, both troublemakers are at least partly to blame. To provide the most effective treatment, doctors need to know as much as possible about how these partners in sickness and poor health work together.

Computing Tool Will Allow More Accurate Genome Sequencing

Scientists’ effort to piece together the genome is taking a significant step forward with a new computerized method that creates more complete and detailed versions of the complex puzzle of life than have ever been produced before.

Multi-Million-Dollar Research Effort Aims to Cripple Cancer’s Deadly Ability to Spread

Supported by a $9-million grant from the National Cancer Institute, a diverse team led by Johns Hopkins researchers has begun looking for new ways to attack one of the scariest traits of this disease: its frequent refusal to stay in one place.

Light Tames Lethal Heart Disorders in Mice and Virtual Humans

Using high-tech human heart models and mouse experiments, scientists at Johns Hopkins and Germany’s University of Bonn have shown that beams of light could replace electric shocks in patients reeling from a deadly heart rhythm disorder. The findings, published online Sept. 12 in the October 2016 edition of The Journal of Clinical Investigation, could pave the way for a new type of implantable defibrillators.

Research Reveals Cancer Pathway to Spreading Through the Body

Cancer cells need oxygen to survive, as do most other life forms, but scientists had never tracked their search for oxygen in their early growth stages until now — a step toward deeper understanding of one way cancer spreads that could help treat the disease.

Protein Found to Bolster Growth of Damaged Muscle Tissue

Johns Hopkins University biologists have found that a protein that plays a key role in the lives of stem cells can bolster the growth of damaged muscle tissue, a step that could potentially contribute to treatments for muscle degeneration caused by old age and diseases such as muscular dystrophy.