About Johns Hopkins
Johns Hopkins University

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Mathematician Receives NSF Grant for Innovative Brain Research

Carey Priebe, a noted mathematician in Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering, has been awarded a National Science Foundation EAGER grant for his work exploring the complex behaviors of the brain’s circuitry.

Johns Hopkins Museums Fall Highlights

Johns Hopkins University Museums September – November 2014 exhibition and programming highlights.

Johns Hopkins Researcher Finds People Born Blind Perceive Sight Similar to Those With Vision

With the use of verbal stories, a researcher from Johns Hopkins University has found that the brains of people born blind respond to situations similarly to the way people with sight do.

Physicist Who Probes the Origin of the Universe Wins Prestigious Simons Award

Marc Kamionkowski, a Johns Hopkins professor who is developing theories to explain how the universe was formed, is one of six physicists who have been selected to receive a 2014 Simons Foundation Investigator award, which will provide up to $1 million to support his work.

Injectable Foam Could Prevent Fatal Blood Loss in Wounded Soldiers

Without prompt care, a badly wounded soldier can easily bleed to death while being transported to a distant medical station. Two traditional treatments—tourniquets and medicated gauze pads—often cannot stop the blood loss from a deep wound at the neck, shoulder or groin. To give these soldiers a fighting chance at survival, Johns Hopkins undergraduates have invented an injectable foam system designed to stop profuse bleeding from a wound where a limb or the head is connected to the torso.

19th Century Math Tactic Gets a Makeover—and Yields Answers Up to 200 Times Faster

A relic from long before the age of supercomputers, the 169-year-old math strategy called the Jacobi iterative method is widely dismissed today as too slow to be useful. But thanks to a curious, numbers-savvy Johns Hopkins engineering student and his professor, it may soon get a new lease on life.

JHU Biologists Identify New Neural Pathway in Eyes that Aids in Vision

A type of retina cell plays a more critical role in vision than previously known, a team led by Johns Hopkins University researchers has discovered.

U.S. Welfare Spending Up — But Help for the Neediest Down

Although the United States is spending more on welfare than ever before, most of that money is going to better-off families rather than the very poorest. That means in 2014, a family of four earning $11,925 a year likely got less aid than a same-sized family earning $47,700.

Sheridan Libraries Announce Roland Park Company Records Now Open For Researchers

The Johns Hopkins University Sheridan Libraries are pleased to announce completion of the processing of the Roland Park Company records.

Statement from the Johns Hopkins University

The Johns Hopkins University is deeply committed to the safety and welfare of our community and to ensuring a safe environment for learning and scholarship. That commitment includes protecting our students from sexual violence, offering support to victims, dealing firmly and fairly with alleged offenders, and informing students, faculty and staff of serious and ongoing threats to campus safety.

Johns Hopkins Announces 2014 Honorary Degree Recipients

A Pulitzer Prize-winning author and the woman and her lawyer who took the fight for marriage rights to the Supreme Court are among seven distinguished achievers who will receive Johns Hopkins University honorary degrees this year.

Johns Hopkins University Hosts 11th Annual Physics Fair

The Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy will host its 11th annual Physics Fair from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 26 to coincide with the yearly Spring Fair celebration on Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus, 3400 N. Charles St. in Baltimore.

MEDIA ADVISORY: As Anniversary of Deepwater Horizon Disaster Approaches, Johns Hopkins Engineer Available to Discuss Oil Spill Research

April 20, 2014, will mark the four-year anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon disaster, a Gulf of Mexico rig explosion that killed 11 workers and led to the nation’s worst offshore oil spill. Reporters writing an update on this event may wish to interview David Murphy, who is studying oil spills in a Whiting School of Engineering lab at Johns Hopkins.

Johns Hopkins Neuroscientists Find Brain Activity May Mark the Beginning of Memories

By tracking brain activity when an animal stops to look around its environment, neuroscientists at Johns Hopkins University believe they can mark the birth of a memory.

Cosmic Inflation Finding First Predicted by Johns Hopkins Cosmologist

A team of observational cosmologists may have found evidence that cosmic inflation occurred a fraction of a second after the Big Bang, a point predicted 18 years ago by Johns Hopkins University cosmologist and theoretical physicist Marc Kamionkowski.

Three Johns Hopkins Researchers Selected for Sloan Research Fellowship

A theoretical physicist, a computer scientist and a solid-state chemist at the Johns Hopkins University are 2014 recipients of the Sloan Research Fellowship, given annually to young scientists showing promise in their research areas.

Satiric Artist Steve Brodner to Speak at Johns Hopkins

For over 25 years, Brodner’s satiric illustrations and editorial cartoons have appeared in nearly every major American periodical, including The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, Vanity Fair, Fortune, Mother Jones, The Nation, The New York Times, The Washington Post and The Los Angeles Times.

Simulated Blindness Can Help Revive Hearing Loss, Researchers Find

Minimizing a person’s sight for as little as a week may help improve the brain’s ability to process hearing, neuroscientists have found.

The Onion, O’Malley headline Johns Hopkins Foreign Affairs Symposium Series

Gov. Martin O’Malley and writers from the satirical news organization The Onion will appear at Johns Hopkins University as part of the 2014 Foreign Affairs Symposium.

Johns Hopkins Finds With Super Bowl Commercials, Storytelling Beats Sex

They say sex sells, but when it comes to Super Bowl commercials, a Johns Hopkins researcher begs to differ. It’s all about the storytelling, found Keith A. Quesenberry, a lecturer in the university’s Center for Leadership Education.

Spring 2014 Events for Johns Hopkins University Museums

February – May 2014 Exhibition and programming highlights at the Johns Hopkins University museums.

Johns Hopkins Senior Wins Churchill Scholarship

Malinda McPherson, a Johns Hopkins University senior from Belmont, Mass., has won a scholarship from the Winston Churchill Foundation of the United States. The Churchill Scholarship is awarded annually to at least 14 students who have demonstrated a capacity to contribute to the advancement of knowledge in the sciences, engineering or mathematics by completing original, creative work at an advanced level.

Johns Hopkins University Researcher Wins 2014 Pierce Prize for Astronomical Excellence

Nadia L. Zakamska of the Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University has been awarded the 2014 Newton Lacy Pierce Prize for outstanding achievement in observational astronomical research.

It’s All Coming Back to Me Now: JHU Researchers Find Caffeine Enhances Memory

For some, it’s the tradition of steeping tealeaves to brew the perfect cup of tea. For others, it’s the morning shuffle to a coffee maker for a hot jolt of java. Then there are those who like their wake up with the kind of snap and a fizz usually found in a carbonated beverage. Regardless of the routine, the consumption of caffeine is the energy boost of choice for millions to wake up or stay up. Now, however, researchers at the Johns Hopkins University have found another use for the stimulant: memory enhancer.

Testosterone In Male Songbirds May Enhance Desire To Sing But Not Song Quality

Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University have found that introducing testosterone in select areas of a male canary’s brain can affect its ability to successfully attract and mate with a female through birdsong. They also found that enhancing song activity based on testosterone in one brain area can change the size of a separate brain area that regulates song quality.

events calendar
click to view events calendar
browse Johns Hopkins A-Z
click to browse
on the web
  • click for hopkins on Facebook
  • click for hopkins on Twitter
  • click for hopkins on YouTube
  • click for hopkins music