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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

MEDIA ADVISORY: As Anniversary of Deepwater Horizon Disaster Approaches, Johns Hopkins Engineer Available to Discuss Oil Spill Research

April 20, 2014, will mark the four-year anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon disaster, a Gulf of Mexico rig explosion that killed 11 workers and led to the nation’s worst offshore oil spill. Reporters writing an update on this event may wish to interview David Murphy, who is studying oil spills in a Whiting School of Engineering lab at Johns Hopkins.

Johns Hopkins Neuroscientists Find Brain Activity May Mark the Beginning of Memories

By tracking brain activity when an animal stops to look around its environment, neuroscientists at Johns Hopkins University believe they can mark the birth of a memory.

Cosmic Inflation Finding First Predicted by Johns Hopkins Cosmologist

A team of observational cosmologists may have found evidence that cosmic inflation occurred a fraction of a second after the Big Bang, a point predicted 18 years ago by Johns Hopkins University cosmologist and theoretical physicist Marc Kamionkowski.

Three Johns Hopkins Researchers Selected for Sloan Research Fellowship

A theoretical physicist, a computer scientist and a solid-state chemist at the Johns Hopkins University are 2014 recipients of the Sloan Research Fellowship, given annually to young scientists showing promise in their research areas.

Satiric Artist Steve Brodner to Speak at Johns Hopkins

For over 25 years, Brodner’s satiric illustrations and editorial cartoons have appeared in nearly every major American periodical, including The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, Vanity Fair, Fortune, Mother Jones, The Nation, The New York Times, The Washington Post and The Los Angeles Times.

Simulated Blindness Can Help Revive Hearing Loss, Researchers Find

Minimizing a person’s sight for as little as a week may help improve the brain’s ability to process hearing, neuroscientists have found.

The Onion, O’Malley headline Johns Hopkins Foreign Affairs Symposium Series

Gov. Martin O’Malley and writers from the satirical news organization The Onion will appear at Johns Hopkins University as part of the 2014 Foreign Affairs Symposium.

Johns Hopkins Finds With Super Bowl Commercials, Storytelling Beats Sex

They say sex sells, but when it comes to Super Bowl commercials, a Johns Hopkins researcher begs to differ. It’s all about the storytelling, found Keith A. Quesenberry, a lecturer in the university’s Center for Leadership Education.

Spring 2014 Events for Johns Hopkins University Museums

February – May 2014 Exhibition and programming highlights at the Johns Hopkins University museums.

Johns Hopkins Senior Wins Churchill Scholarship

Malinda McPherson, a Johns Hopkins University senior from Belmont, Mass., has won a scholarship from the Winston Churchill Foundation of the United States. The Churchill Scholarship is awarded annually to at least 14 students who have demonstrated a capacity to contribute to the advancement of knowledge in the sciences, engineering or mathematics by completing original, creative work at an advanced level.

Johns Hopkins University Researcher Wins 2014 Pierce Prize for Astronomical Excellence

Nadia L. Zakamska of the Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University has been awarded the 2014 Newton Lacy Pierce Prize for outstanding achievement in observational astronomical research.

It’s All Coming Back to Me Now: JHU Researchers Find Caffeine Enhances Memory

For some, it’s the tradition of steeping tealeaves to brew the perfect cup of tea. For others, it’s the morning shuffle to a coffee maker for a hot jolt of java. Then there are those who like their wake up with the kind of snap and a fizz usually found in a carbonated beverage. Regardless of the routine, the consumption of caffeine is the energy boost of choice for millions to wake up or stay up. Now, however, researchers at the Johns Hopkins University have found another use for the stimulant: memory enhancer.

Testosterone In Male Songbirds May Enhance Desire To Sing But Not Song Quality

Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University have found that introducing testosterone in select areas of a male canary’s brain can affect its ability to successfully attract and mate with a female through birdsong. They also found that enhancing song activity based on testosterone in one brain area can change the size of a separate brain area that regulates song quality.

Johns Hopkins Senior Anna Wherry Wins Marshall Scholarship

The 21-year-old, who is double majoring in public health in public health and anthropology, is one of 34 students chosen from the United States for the scholarship. She will enroll in Oxford University’s refugee and forced migration studies program and also pursue a masters in social anthropology from the University of Edinburgh.

MEDIA ADVISORY: JHU Expert Available to Speak on Comet ISON Grazing Sun

Stephan McCandliss, principal investigator on one of the NASA missions studying Comet ISON as it nears death or destiny, is available to comment about the comet, what it means to scientists and what we can learn from its Thanksgiving date with the sun.

FORTIS Takes Flight on Mission to Analyze Comet ISON

The adage “if at first you don’t succeed, try, try again” is apt advice in a host of life’s challenges but none more timely than the launch of FORTIS, a NASA-funded sounding rocket, that took flight before dawn on November 20 from a New Mexican desert.

New York City Finds Success in Cutting Chronic Absenteeism in School

Mentors, wake-up calls to students, incentives and weekly “student success” meetings led by principals, helped New York City significantly cut chronic absenteeism in schools, according to a new report by the Everyone Graduates Center at The Johns Hopkins University School of Education.

JHU Astronomer Awarded $9.5 Million to Create “Virtual Telescope” to Observe Scientific Data

A team of scientists at The Johns Hopkins University has received a grant for $9.5 million over five years to develop, build and maintain large-scale data sets that will allow for greater access and better usability of the information for the science community.

Johns Hopkins Project Aims to help Mid-Atlantic combat Hurricanes, Heat Waves

The National Science Foundation has awarded Seth Guikema, a Johns Hopkins University assistant professor of geography and environmental engineering, a $3 million grant to build a program that will determine the effect of repeated hurricanes and heat waves on the Mid-Atlantic region and suggest ways to improve the region’s ability to withstand them.

Sheridan Libraries Open ‘The Dawn of Neurosurgery’ Exhibition Highlighting Rare Books Related to Early Attempts to Understand the Brain in Renaissance Europe

The exhibition contains highlights from the world’s foremost private collection of Renaissance books, charting the prehistory of what we now call neurosurgery, and was guest curated by the collector Dr. Eugene S. Flamm.

Artist Kyle Staver To Speak At Johns Hopkins

New York-based artist Kyle Staver will join Homewood Art Workshops Director Craig Hankin for a discussion and slide show on Oct. 24 at the Johns Hopkins University.

JHU Physicist-Produced Documentary to Appear in New York Film Festival

The temperature is heating up for Particle Fever, a documentary produced by Johns Hopkins University professor David Kaplan that highlights the construction of one of the most audacious ventures in modern science. The film will be screened on Sept. 29 and Oct. 2 at the New York Film Festival, one of the most prestigious in the country.

Johns Hopkins Physicists Receive $1.3 Million Grant to Study the Early Universe

Three Johns Hopkins University theoretical physicists have received a $1.3 million grant from the John Templeton Foundation to develop new ideas for the origin of the universe and alternative ways to test those ideas. The grant, awarded last month, will also be used to support a post-doctoral program for young scientists in theoretical research as well as to create a visitors program to bring notable scientists in the field to the university to collaborate with researchers.

Johns Hopkins Museums Announce Fall, Winter Programming

October – December 2013 Exhibition & Programming Highlights

Johns Hopkins Debuts Minor in Art

University leaders expect the designation to give the program, which includes painting, drawing, cartooning, sculpture and photography, an even higher profile on and off campus.

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