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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Scientist Programs Robot for “Soft Tissue” Surgery

Simon Leonard, a Johns Hopkins University computer scientist is part of a team that just published research showing that a robot surgeon can indeed adjust to the subtle movement and deformation of soft tissue to execute precise and consistent suturing. The research, which appears in the journal Science Translational Medicine promises to improve results for patients and make the best surgical techniques more widely available.

Johns Hopkins Professor Awarded “Early Career” Honor

Rebecca Schulman, an assistant professor in Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering, is among 49 young scientists across the country to receive grants from the U.S. Energy Department’s Office of Science under the agency’s Early Career Research Program.

Student Engineers to Present Projects in Johns Hopkins-City Program

Graffiti scrawlers in Highlandtown, beware: a team of third- and fourth-graders is building a drone to catch you in the act, and also clean the building.

Johns Hopkins Joins Effort to Teach Math, Science Through Music

Music can make you want to dance, sing and clap your hands, but can it also make you want to learn math? A Johns Hopkins University professor of applied mathematics hopes so.

Spike Lee to Give Commencement Address

Filmmaker Spike Lee, whose acclaimed works including Do The Right Thing and Jungle Fever have challenged assumptions about race and prejudice, will speak at the Johns Hopkins University’s commencement ceremony on May 18.

New Research Shows Quasars Slowed Star Formation

Research led by Johns Hopkins University scientists has found new persuasive evidence that could help solve a long-standing mystery in astrophysics: why did the pace of star formation in the universe slow down some 11 billion years ago?

Johns Hopkins Graduate Programs Rank Among U.S. News Best

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in nursing, education, medicine, and biomedical engineering remain among the best in the nation, according to the newest U.S. News & World Report rankings of “Best Graduate Schools.”

Johns Hopkins Joins National Research on New Tech Components

The Johns Hopkins University is establishing a cutting-edge crystal growth facility as part of a national research project meant to revolutionize technology used in consumer products, industry and medicine, the National Science Foundation just announced.

Johns Hopkins University Hosts Hackathon for Tech Leaders of Tomorrow

Johns Hopkins University will stage the bi‐annual weekend hackathon testing some of the brightest minds not just on campus, but from all over the country.

Johns Hopkins Rocketeers Launch Their Most Sensitive Instrument Yet

Rocketeers led by Johns Hopkins University astrophysicist Stephan R. McCandliss just launched the most sensitive instrument they’ve ever used to explore outer space, seeking clues to how galaxies grow with the birth of new stars, and how they stop growing.

Research Traces Cause of Organ Dysfunction in Down Syndrome

While most Down syndrome research has focused on the brain, a new report by Johns Hopkins University biologists uncovers how the disorder hampers the rest of the nervous system that plays a key role in health and longevity.

Diamonds May Not Be So Rare As Once Thought

Diamonds may not be as rare as once believed, but this finding in a new Johns Hopkins University research report won’t mean deep discounts at local jewelry stores.

Johns Hopkins Biologist Leads Research Shedding Light On Stem Cells

A Johns Hopkins University biologist has led a research team reporting progress in understanding the mysterious shape-shifting ways of stem cells, which have vast potential for medical research and disease treatment.

Johns Hopkins and DuPont Join Forces to Produce an Improved Ebola Protection Suit

The Johns Hopkins University and DuPont have signed license and collaboration agreements allowing DuPont to commercialize a garment with innovative features from Johns Hopkins to help protect people on the front lines of the Ebola crisis and future deadly infectious disease outbreaks. DuPont intends to have the first of these garments available in the marketplace during the first half of 2016.

Scientists report earlier shift in human ancestor diet

Millions of years ago our primate ancestors turned from trees and shrubs in search of food on the ground. In human evolution, that has made all the difference. The change marked a significant step toward the diverse eating habits that became a key human characteristic, and would have made these early humans more mobile and adaptable to their environment.

Johns Hopkins Math Students a Hit With Minor League Baseball Schedulers

With the help of some Johns Hopkins University math students, Minor League Baseball is catching up with the majors in using computers to produce its game schedules.

Johns Hopkins Biologist Awarded Pew Research Grant

June 11, 2015 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Arthur Hirsch Office: 443-997-9909 Cell: 443-462-8702 ahirsch6@jhu.edu Christian M. Kaiser, an assistant professor in the Department of Biology at the Johns Hopkins University, has received a $240,000 grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts to study how proteins are produced that function in the cells of all living organisms, […]

Johns Hopkins Astrophysicist Receives 2015 Tomassoni Chisesi Prize

Charles L. Bennett, the Alumni Centennial Professor of Physics and Astronomy and Gilman Scholar in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences at Johns Hopkins University, will receive the 2015 “Caterina Tomassoni and Felice Pietro Chisesi Prize” in June at the University of Roma “La Sapienz” in Italy.

Klausen Awarded Energy Department “Early Career” Honor

Rebekka S. Klausen, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry at the Johns Hopkins University, is among 44 young scientists across the country chosen to receive grants from the U.S. Energy Department’s Office of Science under the agency’s Early Career Research Program.

JHU Researchers Make New Discovery About 3-D Shape Processing in the Brain

While previous studies of the brain suggest that processing of objects and places occur in very different locations, a Johns Hopkins University research team has found they are closely related.

JHU Researcher’s Use of Owls Provide Clues on How Humans Might Direct Attention

Imagine a quarterback on the gridiron getting ready to pass the ball to a receiver. Suddenly, in charges a growling linebacker aiming to take him down. At what point does the quarterback abandon the throw and trigger evasive maneuvers?

Johns Hopkins Announces 2014-15 President’s Reading Series Authors

A chronicler of the black experience, a winner of the Man Booker Prize and a novelist whose debut work was included in Time magazine’s list of 100 best novels, will visit Johns Hopkins University this year through the second annual President’s Reading Series.

Johns Hopkins Mathematician Receives NSF Grant for Innovative Brain Research

Carey Priebe, a noted mathematician in Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering, has been awarded a National Science Foundation EAGER grant for his work exploring the complex behaviors of the brain’s circuitry.

Johns Hopkins Museums Fall Highlights

Johns Hopkins University Museums September – November 2014 exhibition and programming highlights.

Johns Hopkins Researcher Finds People Born Blind Perceive Sight Similar to Those With Vision

With the use of verbal stories, a researcher from Johns Hopkins University has found that the brains of people born blind respond to situations similarly to the way people with sight do.