About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Method Determines Cell Age More Accurately, Could Help Elderly Patients

Led by scientists at Johns Hopkins University, a team of researchers is reporting progress in developing a method to accurately determine the functional age of cells, a step that could eventually help clinicians evaluate and recommend ways to delay some health effects of aging and potentially improve other treatments, including skin graft matching and predicting prospects for wound healing.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Develop Super-strong Metal for Next Tech Frontier

The technological future of everything from cars and jet engines to oil rigs, along with the gadgets, appliances and public utilities comprising the Internet of Things will depend on microscopic sensors.

Trouble is these sensors are mostly made of the material silicon, which has its limits. Johns Hopkins University materials scientist and mechanical engineer Kevin J. Hemker has led a team that is now reporting success in developing a new material that promises to help ensure that these sensors, also known as microelectromechanical systems [MEMS], can continue to meet the demands of the next technological frontier.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Researchers to Present Their Work on Capitol Hill

Early career scientists, physicians, engineers and specialists in public health, nursing, music and marketing from Johns Hopkins University will gather on Capitol Hill in Washington to present their federally-funded research, emphasizing the importance of continuing federal support in the pursuit of new knowledge and innovation.

Media Advisory: Robots Play Soccer, Catch and Chess at Johns Hopkins

The Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering is staging a demonstration by students who have programmed robots and drones to perform an array of tasks, including playing chess with a real chess board and passing around a soccer ball.

Media Advisory: Astronaut Kate Rubins to Speak at Johns Hopkins University

Kate Rubins, the first person to sequence DNA in space aboard the International Space Station last year, will talk about her work as a scientist and astronaut.

Scientists Make the Case to Restore Pluto’s Planet Status

Johns Hopkins University scientist Kirby Runyon wants to make one thing clear: Regardless of what one prestigious scientific organization says to the contrary, Pluto is a planet. So is Europa, commonly known as a moon of Jupiter, and the Earth’s Moon, and more than 100 other celestial bodies in our solar system that are denied this status under a prevailing definition of “planet.”

Johns Hopkins Graduate Programs Rank Among U.S. News Best

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in nursing, education, medicine, and biomedical engineering are considered among the best in the country, according to the newest U.S. News & World Report rankings of “Best Graduate Schools.”

Media Advisory: Hundreds of College Students to Convene at JHU for Weekend of HopHacks

Graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University for the latest HopHacks, a marathon session challenging students to realize their best software and hardware ideas and compete for cash and other sponsored prizes.

Study Identifies Molecular Signal for Maintaining Adult Neuron

Research led by a Johns Hopkins University biologist sheds light on the subject, potentially pointing the way to a better understanding of how the structure of nerve cells in the adult hippocampus may deteriorate, which can lead to Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders.

Johns Hopkins Joins Alliance to Expand College Access For 50,000 Talented Lower-income Students

The Johns Hopkins University is joining 29 other colleges and universities to expand by at least 50,000 the number of talented low- and moderate-income students at the U.S. undergraduate institutions with the highest graduation rates.

Is Your Favorite Ballplayer Hitting When It Matters, or Just Padding His Stats?

In time for Major League Baseball’s Winter Meetings this week, a team of computer scientists from Johns Hopkins University is adding to the ocean of baseball statistics with what appears to be the first analysis of hitters’ performance when their team is either just about guaranteed to win, or hopelessly behind. In a 54-page unpublished paper consisting mostly of statistics, the three authors call this the “Meaningless Game Situation.”

Exotic Insulator May Hold Clue to Key Mystery of Modern Physics

Experiments using laser light and pieces of gray material the size of fingernail clippings may offer clues to a fundamental scientific riddle: what is the relationship between the everyday world of classical physics and the hidden quantum realm that obeys entirely different rules?

ADVISORY: Bernie Sanders to Speak at Johns Hopkins

Bernie Sanders, a U.S. senator and former Democratic presidential candidate, to speak at Johns Hopkins University.

Research Shows Nerve Growth Protein Controls Blood Sugar

Research led by a Johns Hopkins University biologist demonstrates the workings of a biochemical pathway that helps control glucose in the bloodstream, a development that could potentially lead to treatments for diabetes.

Computing Tool Will Allow More Accurate Genome Sequencing

Scientists’ effort to piece together the genome is taking a significant step forward with a new computerized method that creates more complete and detailed versions of the complex puzzle of life than have ever been produced before.

Scientists’ Finding Supports Moon Creation Hypothesis

New research led by Johns Hopkins University scientists argues that a layer of iron and other elements deep under ground is the evidence scientists have long been seeking to support the hypothesis that the moon was formed by a planetary object hitting the infant Earth some 4.5 billion years ago.

Scientists Find New Ways to Track Stars Eaten by Black Holes

Research led by Johns Hopkins University astrophysicists using information from a NASA space telescope breaks new ground in ways to observe a star swallowed by a black hole, promising to help paint a more clear picture of this cosmic phenomenon.

Johns Hopkins Scientist Named to Popular Science “Brilliant 10”

Suchi Saria, a computer scientist at Johns Hopkins University, has been named as one of Popular Science’s Brilliant 10, the magazine’s annual list of the “brightest young minds in science and engineering.”

Can One Cosmic Enigma Help Solve Another?

Astrophysicists from Johns Hopkins University have proposed a clever new way of shedding light on the mysterious dark matter believed to make up most of the universe. The irony is they want to try to pin down the nature of this unexplained phenomenon by using another, an obscure cosmic emanation known as “fast radio bursts.”

Research Reveals Cancer Pathway to Spreading Through the Body

Cancer cells need oxygen to survive, as do most other life forms, but scientists had never tracked their search for oxygen in their early growth stages until now — a step toward deeper understanding of one way cancer spreads that could help treat the disease.

Cyber Security Experts to Discuss Attack Defense, Response

How do hackers crack a computer system and steal data? How should organizations protect themselves? How should they prepare for and respond to attack? These are among the questions that will be addressed by experts in the field at the third annual Senior Executive Cyber Security Conference to be held Wednesday, Sept. 21 at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

Protein Found to Bolster Growth of Damaged Muscle Tissue

Johns Hopkins University biologists have found that a protein that plays a key role in the lives of stem cells can bolster the growth of damaged muscle tissue, a step that could potentially contribute to treatments for muscle degeneration caused by old age and diseases such as muscular dystrophy.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Lead Effort to Protect Vital Networks

Johns Hopkins University computer scientists have led an effort to create a proven way to prevent sabotage from disrupting electronic networks supporting major infrastructure such as power grids and the electronic cloud.

Johns Hopkins Students Design Ebola Protection Suit Improvements

Two Johns Hopkins mechanical engineering teams have developed improvements for a protective suit for health workers treating people stricken with Ebola and other infectious diseases, including prototypes for a more comfortable hood and face mask that make breathing easier, and for a battery-powered system that curbs humidity in the suit.

Did Gravitational Wave Detector Find Dark Matter?

When an astronomical observatory in the United States this winter detected a whisper of two black holes colliding in deep space, scientists celebrated a successful effort to confirm Albert Einstein’s prediction of gravitational waves. A team of Johns Hopkins University astrophysicists wondered about something else: Had the experiment found the “dark matter” that makes up most of the mass of the universe?