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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.


Women’s Lacrosse Joins Big Ten as Sport Affiliate Member

The Johns Hopkins women’s lacrosse team has been accepted by the Big Ten Conference as a sport affiliate member and will begin play in the league during the 2017 season.

Johns Hopkins Math Students a Hit With Minor League Baseball Schedulers

With the help of some Johns Hopkins University math students, Minor League Baseball is catching up with the majors in using computers to produce its game schedules.

Love and Money: How Low-Income Dads Really Provide

Low-income fathers who might be labeled “deadbeat dads” often spend as much on their children as parents in formal child support arrangements, but they choose to give goods like food and clothing rather than cash, a Johns Hopkins-led study found.

Johns Hopkins Biologist Awarded Pew Research Grant

June 11, 2015 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Arthur Hirsch Office: 443-997-9909 Cell: 443-462-8702 ahirsch6@jhu.edu Christian M. Kaiser, an assistant professor in the Department of Biology at the Johns Hopkins University, has received a $240,000 grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts to study how proteins are produced that function in the cells of all living organisms, [...]

Noninvasive Brain Stimulator May Ease Parkinson’s Symptoms in a Patient’s Home

Parkinson’s disease patients whose symptoms such as tremor, muscle stiffness and slowed movement make it tough to hold an eating utensil steady have few options for relief outside of a hospital or clinic. To give these patients another in-home treatment option, Johns Hopkins graduate students have invented a headband-shaped device to deliver noninvasive brain stimulation to help tamp down the symptoms.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Expert Available to Discuss Restart of LHC

Andrei Gritsan, a Johns Hopkins University associate professor of physics and astronomy who contributed to the discovery of the fundamental particle known as the Higgs boson, is available to discuss the restart of the Large Hadron Collider, where the Higgs boson was detected in 2012.

New York Open-Data Program Chief Joins Center for Government Excellence

Andrew Nicklin, former head of groundbreaking open-data programs in New York city and state, has joined a Johns Hopkins University project to make cities’ data more accessible and help solve urban problems.

When the Color We See Isn’t the Color We Remember

Though people can distinguish between millions of colors, we have trouble remembering specific shades because our brains tend to store what we’ve seen as one of just a few basic hues, a Johns Hopkins University-led team discovered.

New Kit May Help Train Global Health Providers to Insert and Remove Contraceptive Implants

To address a global health challenge, a team of Johns Hopkins University biomedical engineering undergraduates has developed a teaching set called the Contraceptive Implant Training Tool Kit or CITT Kit, for short. The medical simulator includes two training models: a stand-alone replica arm and a layered band that can be worn by health workers who act as “patients” during practice sessions.

$10 Million Aronson Gift Creates International Studies Center

The chair of the Johns Hopkins University’s board of trustees and his wife have committed $10 million to give students new opportunities in international relations and to enhance scholarly work on major world issues.

Who’s Making Sure the Power Stays On?

Electricity systems in the United States are so haphazardly regulated for reliability, it’s nearly impossible for customers to know their true risk of losing service in a major storm, a Johns Hopkins University analysis found.

Undergrad Tuition to Rise 3.5 Percent, Aid 7 Percent

Tuition for full-time liberal arts and engineering undergraduates at the Johns Hopkins University will increase 3.5 percent in the 2015-2016 academic year while the financial aid budget for those students rises 7 percent.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Commencement May 21

About 7,000 students will claim their degrees at the commencement ceremony for all of Johns Hopkins University’s divisions and campuses.

Special Graduation Scheduled for JHU’s NCAA Lacrosse, Track Athletes

MEDIA ADVISORY: The university will hold a special graduation ceremony for athletes who will miss Thursday’s commencement because of NCAA championship competition.

Critics of American Tax Scofflaws ‘Hypocritical’

Although critics knock United States-based companies like Apple, Google and Starbucks for dodging taxes overseas, a new analysis shows that European companies in the states are enjoying the same sort of tax breaks.

Johns Hopkins To Launch Education Policy Institute

The Johns Hopkins University School of Education, the nation’s number one ranked graduate school of education, will open a policy institute this summer to translate rigorous research into a prominent force for change, to initiate research projects and to analyze important issues in public forums.

Johns Hopkins Commencement Set for May 21

About 7,000 students will claim their degrees Thursday, May 21, at the commencement ceremony for all of Johns Hopkins University’s divisions and campuses.

Johns Hopkins Astrophysicist Receives 2015 Tomassoni Chisesi Prize

Charles L. Bennett, the Alumni Centennial Professor of Physics and Astronomy and Gilman Scholar in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences at Johns Hopkins University, will receive the 2015 “Caterina Tomassoni and Felice Pietro Chisesi Prize” in June at the University of Roma “La Sapienz” in Italy.

13 Named Fulbright Scholars at Johns Hopkins

Thirteen Johns Hopkins University students and recent graduates will have the opportunity to travel abroad to such places as Fiji, China, and France to study, teach, and conduct research after recently being named Fulbright Scholars.

Klausen Awarded Energy Department “Early Career” Honor

Rebekka S. Klausen, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry at the Johns Hopkins University, is among 44 young scientists across the country chosen to receive grants from the U.S. Energy Department’s Office of Science under the agency’s Early Career Research Program.

Say What? How the Brain Separates Our Ability to Talk and Write

Although the human ability to write evolved from our ability to speak, in the brain, writing and talking are now such independent systems that someone who can’t write a grammatically correct sentence may be able say it aloud flawlessly, discovered a team led by Johns Hopkins University cognitive scientist Brenda Rapp.

Johns Hopkins Community Joins in Day of Service to Baltimore

About 380 Johns Hopkins alumni, students, parents and employees and their relatives and friends are volunteering for Baltimore City at 10 sites on Saturday, May 2.

Two Johns Hopkins Researchers Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Two Johns Hopkins University professors, Aravinda Chakravarti and Donald Geman, are among 84 new members elected to the National Academy of Sciences, an honorary society that advises the government on scientific matters.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Teams of Student Entrepreneurs to Face Judges for $81,000 in Johns Hopkins Business Plan Funding on Friday, May 1

The nationally recognized Johns Hopkins University Business Plan Competition, hosted on Friday, May 1, by the Center for Leadership Education, will feature student teams from various divisions of Johns Hopkins University, as well as students representing The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Yale School of Management, and Tulane University. The teams will compete in one of four categories, for a portion of $81,000 in funding to be announced at a dinner that night.

Holy Agility! Keen Sense of Touch Guides Nimble Bat Flight

Bats fly with breathtaking precision because their wings are equipped with highly sensitive touch sensors, cells that respond to even slight changes in airflow, researchers have demonstrated for the first time.