About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Scientists Find Mastering the Art of Ignoring Makes People More Efficient

People searching for something can find it faster if they know what to look for. But new research suggests knowing what not to look for can be just as helpful.

What Bats Reveal About How Humans Focus Attention

You’re at a crowded party, noisy with multiple conversations, music and clinking glasses. But when someone behind you says your name, you hear it and quickly turn in that direction. The same sort of thing happens with bats and Johns Hopkins University researchers have discovered how a bat’s brain determines what’s worth paying attention to. The findings, which have implications across animal systems, were published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Web Search Study Finds a ‘Charlie Sheen Effect’ on HIV Prevention

A Johns Hopkins computer scientist played a key role in a new study that analyzed online news and search engine records to gauge the public’s response to actor Charlie Sheen’s Nov. 17, 2015, disclosure on NBC’s TODAY Show that he was HIV-positive.

How Your Brain Might be Secretly Thwarting Your New Year’s Resolutions

The human brain is wired to pay attention to previously pleasing things — a finding that could help explain why it’s hard to break bad habits or stick to New Year’s resolutions.

Johns Hopkins University Hosts Hackathon for Tech Leaders of Tomorrow

Johns Hopkins University will stage the bi‐annual weekend hackathon testing some of the brightest minds not just on campus, but from all over the country.

Johns Hopkins Launches Center to Reshape Medical Care

The Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare builds on the School of Engineering’s history of successful collaborations across the Johns Hopkins institutions, including with the university’s renowned School of Medicine, and will create clinician-engineering teams focused on three priority areas of innovation: data analytics, systems design and analysis, and technology and devices.

Johns Hopkins Biologist Scott Bailey Receives $250,000 President’s Frontier Award

A public health biologist who is trying to stop the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and pave the way to new treatments for genetic diseases has received the 2016 President’s Frontier Award, a Johns Hopkins University honor that provides $250,000 in research funding. The program was launched last year as part of an expanded university effort to provide more funding to help its faculty move forward with innovative research projects. This year’s recipient is Scott Bailey, an associate professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, within the university’s Bloomberg School of Public Health.

What Goes Wrong in the Brain When Someone Can’t Spell

By studying stroke victims who have lost the ability to spell, researchers have pinpointed the parts of the brain that control how we write words.

Snowden, ‘Orange is the New Black’ Author Headline JHU Speaker Series

A whistleblower, the author of a bestselling book about life in a women’s prison, and the founder of Vox.com are among those speaking at Johns Hopkins University as part of the 2016 Foreign Affairs Symposium speaker series.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Angela Davis to Speak at Johns Hopkins

Angela Davis, a leading thinker on issues of racial politics and criminal justice reform, will visit Johns Hopkins University as part of the JHU Forums on Race in America.

Department of Labor Official Joins 21st Century Cities Initiative

Ben Seigel, a Baltimore native who helped design the Obama Administration’s place-based strategy and led the federal government’s effort to address deep-rooted issues in Baltimore after last year’s unrest, has joined a Johns Hopkins University project to strengthen cities with similar urban challenges.

Media Advisory: Volunteers to Clean the ‘Cathedral of Books’

Reporters are invited to cover Friday’s annual cleaning of the George Peabody Library, Baltimore’s “Cathedral of Books,” by a crew of library staff and volunteers.

Johns Hopkins to Put Cameras in Hands of Baltimore Youth

Young people in Baltimore City will have a chance to express themselves creatively and build their resumes with the launch of Johns Hopkins University’s youth filmmaking program.

CHRISTMAS EVE: Graveside Commememoration of Mr. Johns Hopkins on 142nd Anniversary of His Death

Johns Hopkins employees, alumni, students and friends will attend the annual Christmas Eve graveside observance honoring the founder of the university and health system, Mr. Johns Hopkins.

Johns Hopkins Rocketeers Launch Their Most Sensitive Instrument Yet

Rocketeers led by Johns Hopkins University astrophysicist Stephan R. McCandliss just launched the most sensitive instrument they’ve ever used to explore outer space, seeking clues to how galaxies grow with the birth of new stars, and how they stop growing.

Research Traces Cause of Organ Dysfunction in Down Syndrome

While most Down syndrome research has focused on the brain, a new report by Johns Hopkins University biologists uncovers how the disorder hampers the rest of the nervous system that plays a key role in health and longevity.

Johns Hopkins Welcomes First Members of the Class of 2020

A record number of high school students applied early decision this fall to the Johns Hopkins University, identifying it as their top choice and committing to attend if admitted. The 1,929 applicants represent a 3 percent increase from last year’s early decision pool, which had already seen a 17 percent increase from the prior year.

Johns Hopkins Leads U.S. Universities in Research Spending a 36th Time

The Johns Hopkins University led U.S. higher education in research and development for the 36th straight year, spending a record $2.242 billion in fiscal 2014 to expand scientific knowledge, find cures for disease, promote health and advance technology.

Five Johns Hopkins Engineering Doctoral Students Honored as 2016 Siebel Scholars

Five Johns Hopkins graduate students, recently named to the 2016 class of Siebel Scholars, are each pursuing bioengineering projects that could lead to important new diagnostic and treatment advances in healthcare. The merit-based Siebel program has recognized their research skills, academic achievements and leadership qualities by providing $35,000 to each of the five PhD candidates for use in his or her final year of graduate studies.

Johns Hopkins Researchers’ Career-Long Study Wins Top Education Prize

Three Johns Hopkins University researchers whose 2014 book traced the lives of nearly 800 Baltimore City public school students for a quarter of a century have won the prestigious $100,000 Grawemeyer Award in Education.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Mousetraps, Rubber Bands and Bowling Balls Will Provide Power in Student Contest

Forty-four Johns Hopkins freshmen from an introductory mechanical engineering course will compete. Teams of two or three students have each built devices that are designed to roll across the Shriver Hall stage and then launch a small projectile over a dozen rows of seats before landing in Row M.

Why Some People Would Pay for a Drug They Probably Won’t Ever Need

A sick person is obviously willing to pay for a good medical treatment, but a Johns Hopkins University economist and his collaborators finds healthy people are potentially a much broader, if largely overlooked, market for medical innovations.

University Leaders Announce Details of Faculty Diversity Initiative

Johns Hopkins University Provost Robert C. Lieberman and the deans of the university’s schools sent a message today to the university’s students, faculty and staff announcing a new Faculty Diversity Initiative at Johns Hopkins. This is the text of that message.

Scientists Get First Glimpse of Black Hole Eating Star, Ejecting High-Speed Flare

An international team of astrophysicists led by a Johns Hopkins University scientist has for the first time witnessed a black hole swallowing a star and ejecting a flare of matter moving at nearly the speed of light.

Rapid Plankton Growth in Ocean Seen as Sign of Carbon Dioxide Loading

A microscopic marine alga is thriving in the North Atlantic to an extent that defies scientific predictions, suggesting swift environmental change as a result of rising carbon dioxide in the ocean, a study led a by Johns Hopkins University scientist has found.