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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins team uses Hubble in record-breaking search for farthest supernova

A team of astronomers at The Johns Hopkins University has used data gathered by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope to spot a supernova that exploded more than 10 billion years ago, breaking the previous record by roughly 350 million years. Nicknamed in a nod to Woodrow Wilson, the 28th president of the United States and a Johns Hopkins alumnus, “SN Wilson” now stands as the farthest known supernova of the type used to measure cosmic distances.

Johns Hopkins’ Bennett and WMAP Team Awarded the 2012 Gruber Cosmology Prize

The Gruber Foundation announced today that the 2012 Cosmology Prize will be awarded to Johns Hopkins University professor Charles L. Bennett and the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) space mission science team that he led. Bennett and the WMAP team are being recognized by the foundation for their transformative study of an ancient light dating back to the infant universe. So precise and accurate are the WMAP results that they form the foundation of the Standard Cosmological Model.

Media Advisory: Observe the Transit of Venus at Johns Hopkins University Astrophysics Event

The Maryland Space Grant Observatory and Johns Hopkins University are inviting star gazers of every experience level to an event that not only will allow them to view the transit, but also to learn more about it, beginning at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, June 5 at the Bloomberg Center for Physics and Astronomy, 3799 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, 21218.

NASA’s Hubble Detects One of the Most Distant Supernovae Yet Observed

A team of Johns Hopkins astrophysicists using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has detected a distant Type Ia supernova, the farthest stellar explosion that can be used to measure the expansion rate of the universe. The supernova is the remnant of a star that exploded 9 billion years ago.

Adam Riess of Johns Hopkins Accepts 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics

Adam Riess, a professor in physics and astronomy at The Johns Hopkins University and a research scientist at the Space Telescope Science Institute, today accepted the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences during a ceremony in Stockholm, Sweden.

President Daniels Congratulates Nobel Laureate Adam Riess

President Ronald J. Daniels sent a broadcast email message to students, faculty and staff at The Johns Hopkins University on Tuesday, Oct. 4, congratulating Professor Adam G. Riess, the just-announced co-winner of the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics. This is the text of that message.

Astrophysicist Adam Riess Wins the 2011 Einstein Medal

Adam Riess, an astrophysicist at The Johns Hopkins University and the Space Telescope Science Institute, today was awarded the Einstein Medal 2011 by the Albert Einstein Society of Bern, Switzerland. The society board of trustees recognized Riess for leadership in the High-z Supernova Search Team’s 1998 discovery that the expansion rate of the universe is accelerating, a phenomenon widely attributed to a mysterious, unexplained “dark energy” filling the universe. Riess, 41, shares this year’s prize with Saul Perlmutter, an astrophysicist at the University of California, Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, whose Supernova Cosmology Project team published similar results shortly after those published by Riess and High-z teammate Brian Schmidt, of the Australian National University.

NAS Names JHU-Affiliated Projects as Astrophysics Priorities

A report released by the National Academy of Sciences names several projects involving astronomers and astrophysicists at The Johns Hopkins University as among the most important astrophysics investments in the next decade. Titled “New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics,” the recently issued report represents the consensus position of hundreds of astronomers and astrophysicists nationwide who participated in the process of prioritizing projects.

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