About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.


Johns Hopkins Scientist Named to Popular Science “Brilliant 10”

Suchi Saria, a computer scientist at Johns Hopkins University, has been named as one of Popular Science’s Brilliant 10, the magazine’s annual list of the “brightest young minds in science and engineering.”

Computer Algorithm Can Forecast Patients’ Deadly Sepsis

The quest for early diagnosis of septic shock — which kills more Americans every year than AIDS and breast and prostate cancer combined – now takes a step forward, as Johns Hopkins University researchers report on a more effective way to spot hospital patients at risk of septic shock. The new computer-based method correctly predicts septic shock in 85 percent of cases, without increasing the false positive rate from screening methods that are common now.

New Computing Center in Baltimore Will Offer Bigger Home for ‘Big Data’ Projects

Whether they’re studying distant galaxies or deadly diseases deep within human cells, Big Data researchers increasingly need more powerful computers and more digital storage space. To address this demand, two Maryland universities are preparing to open one of the nation’s largest academic high-performance computing centers, located at the edge of the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center campus in Baltimore.

JHU Astronomer Awarded $9.5 Million to Create “Virtual Telescope” to Observe Scientific Data

A team of scientists at The Johns Hopkins University has received a grant for $9.5 million over five years to develop, build and maintain large-scale data sets that will allow for greater access and better usability of the information for the science community.

Alexander Szalay of Johns Hopkins Wins Microsoft’s Jim Gray eScience Award

A Johns Hopkins University astrophysicist and computer scientist who is a national leader in the advancing understanding of the role of computing in discovery across a wide range of scientific disciplines was today recognized by the Microsoft Corporation with a Jim Gray eScience Award. Alexander Szalay, the Alumni Centennial Professor at The Johns Hopkins University and director of the university’s Institute for Data Intensive Engineering and Science, will receive the award this week during Microsoft’s annual eScience Workshop, held this week in Stockholm, Sweden. Established in 2008 as a tribute to the late Jim Gray, a Technical Fellow for Microsoft Research who disappeared at sea in 2007, the award recognizes a researcher who has made outstanding contributions to the field of data-intensive computing.