About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

How a Woman With Amnesia Defies Conventional Wisdom About Memory

Johns Hopkins University cognitive scientists say the sharp contrasts in the memory profile of a patient with severe amnesia — her inability to remember facts about pursuits once vital to her life as an artist, musician and amateur aviator, while clearly remembering facts relevant to performing in these domains — suggest conventional wisdom about how the brain stores knowledge is incorrect.

JHU Researcher Lisa Feigenson Receives 2015 Troland Research Award

Lisa Feigenson, a Johns Hopkins University researcher, who specializes in cognition and memory in humans as early as infancy, is a recipient of the National Academy of Sciences 2015 Troland Research Award.

Artificial Grammar Reveals Inborn Language Sense, JHU Study Shows

Parents know the unparalleled joy and wonder of hearing a beloved child’s first words turn quickly into whole sentences and then babbling paragraphs. But how human children acquire language-which is so complex and has so many variations-remains largely a mystery. Fifty years ago, linguist and philosopher Noam Chomsky proposed an answer: Humans are able to learn language so quickly because some knowledge of grammar is hardwired into our brains. In other words, we know some of the most fundamental things about human language unconsciously at birth, without ever being taught. Now, in a groundbreaking study, cognitive scientists at The Johns Hopkins University have confirmed a striking prediction of the controversial hypothesis that human beings are born with knowledge of certain syntactical rules that make learning human languages easier.

Futures Seminars to Determine Academic Direction at Johns Hopkins

Ten distinguished cognitive neuroscientists, cognitive psychologists and linguists from top institutions across the country will gather at Shriver and Mason halls this week to discuss what promise to be the most exciting new developments in the study of the mind and brain over the coming decade. Sponsored by the departments of Cognitive Science and Psychological and Brain Sciences and the Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, this seminar will do more than stimulate discussion: It will create a blueprint for the future of cognitive and brain sciences at The Johns Hopkins University. This event is the seventh in a series of Futures Seminars that began in September with the Classics Department and has included sessions for the departments of Physics and Astronomy, Anthropology and History; the Humanities Center; and the Film and Media Studies program. By this time next year, 21 Futures Seminars comprising every department, discipline and program in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences will have been held, according to Katherine Newman, the James B. Knapp Dean of the school.