About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Welcomes First Members of Class of 2023

A diverse and talented group of 641 high school students who applied for early admission to Johns Hopkins University were offered admission today, making them the first members of the undergraduate Class of 2023.

JHU Survey: Americans Don’t Know Much About State Government

Americans trust their state governments to handle issues as important as education and health care and pay them more than a trillion dollars in taxes annually, yet we know very little about these institutions, a new Johns Hopkins University survey finds.

Advisory: Mikulski Statement on the Death of George H.W. Bush

Retired U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, D-Md., a Homewood Professor at Johns Hopkins University, today issued the following statement on the passing of former President George H.W. Bush.

Insight Into Swimming Fish Could Lead to Robotics Advances

The constant movement of fish that seems random is actually precisely deployed to provide them at any moment with the best sensory feedback they need any to navigate the world, Johns Hopkins University researchers found.

MICHAEL BLOOMBERG MAKES LARGEST EVER CONTRIBUTION TO ANY EDUCATION INSTITUTION IN THE UNITED STATES

Michael R. Bloomberg and Johns Hopkins University announced an unprecedented $1.8 billion philanthropic commitment, representing the largest ever contribution to an academic institution in American history. The historic gift will be devoted exclusively to undergraduate financial aid at one of the world’s leading education, research and patient care institutions, allowing Johns Hopkins University to permanently commit to need-blind admissions and ensure unparalleled educational opportunities for the next generation of global leaders.

Black Students Who Have One Black Teacher More Likely to Go to College

Having one black teacher in elementary school not only makes children more likely to graduate high school, it makes them significantly more likely to enroll in college.

JHU Offers New Master’s Degree in Healthcare Systems Engineering

Johns Hopkins Engineering has launched a new online master’s degree program in healthcare systems engineering. Approved by the Maryland Higher Education Commission, the new program is now accepting applications for the spring 2019 semester.

Johns Hopkins Scientist Finds Elusive Star with Origins Close to Big Bang

Astronomers have found what could be one of the universe’s oldest stars, a body almost entirely made of materials spewed from the Big Bang.

Owls Help JHU Scientists Unlock Secret of How the Brain Pays Attention

By studying barn owls, scientists at Johns Hopkins University believe they’ve taken an important step toward solving the longstanding mystery of how the brain chooses what most deserves attention.

Scientists Find Brain Signal That Might Help Us Judge the Holiday Buffet

At holiday buffets and potlucks people make quick calculations about which dishes to try and how much to take of each. Johns Hopkins University neuroscientists have found a brain region that appears to be strongly connected to these food preference decisions.

Human Retinas Grown in a Dish Explain How Color Vision Develops

Biologists at Johns Hopkins University grew human retinas from scratch to determine how cells that allow people to see in color are made.

High Water Bills Can Unintentionally Harm Disadvantaged Tenants

Landlords in disadvantaged communities are so unsettled by increasing water bills and nuisance fees they are taking it out their tenants, threatening the housing security of those who need it most, a new Johns Hopkins University study concludes.

Gambling Monkeys Help Scientists Find Brain Area Linked to High-Risk Behavior

Monkeys who learned how to gamble have helped researchers pinpoint an area of the brain key to one’s willingness to make risky decisions.

New Johns Hopkins Doctor of Engineering Program Designed for Working Professionals

Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering has created a doctoral engineering program to serve the needs of working engineering professionals and to meet the growing demand for engineers who have the advanced knowledge needed to solve challenging problems.

ADVISORY: At JHU This Weekend, Students to Hack to Improve City Life

More than 300 graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University for the latest 36-hour HopHacks, a marathon session challenging students to come up with software and hardware ideas.

Baltimore Students to Take ‘Wakanda Challenge’ at Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Event

At the annual meeting of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, the nation’s largest gathering of black elected officials, about 100 students from Baltimore City’s Dunbar High School will participate in an event called the STEAM Revolt Youth Workshop: Wakanda Design Challenge. In this interactive contest, students, who are part of Dunbar’s P-TECH college prep program, will create a new Avengers superhero with ties to African culture.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available

Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available.

JHU Partners with Tsinghua for New Engineering Graduate Program

A new program will allow students to earn graduate degrees from both the Johns Hopkins University’s top-ranked Department of Biomedical Engineering and the world’s No. 1 engineering school, Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.

Johns Hopkins University Leads New Research Partnership

Johns Hopkins University has been awarded up to $30 million to lead a consortium of three Mid-Atlantic universities that will work together on research projects with the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Where Martian Dust Comes From

The dust that coats much of the surface of Mars originates largely from a single thousand-kilometer-long geological formation near the Red Planet’s equator, scientists have found.

What Would Your Dog Do to Help If You Were Upset? Quite a Bit, Study Finds

Dogs are thought to be very aware of people’s emotions, but if a pup’s owner was really upset, would it actually go out of its way to offer help and comfort? Some not only will, a new study found, they’ll overcome obstacles to do it.

JHU Project Aims to Save Millions by Reducing Solar Power Forecast Errors

Although the popularity of solar energy has surged, the unpredictability of a weather-dependent technology has kept even more people from embracing it. A new Johns Hopkins University-led project hopes to change that by improving our ability to forecast sunshine and backup power needs.

Urban Violence Can Hurt Test Scores Even for Kids Who Don’t Experience It

Children who attend school with many kids from violent neighborhoods show significantly lower test scores than peers with classmates from safer areas, according to a new Johns Hopkins University study.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Commencement Set for May 24

About 1,500 students will claim their degrees Thursday, May 24, at the commencement ceremony for all of Johns Hopkins University’s divisions and campuses.

Johns Hopkins Announces 2018 Fulbright Grant Winners

Sixteen Johns Hopkins University students and recent graduates have been awarded grants, earning the chance to travel abroad to study, teach and conduct research.