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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

BLocal Announces BUILD College Training Program

To bolster small construction businesses in Baltimore, the companies of BLocal have developed a series of free classes for local minority- and woman-owned firms.

19 Awarded Fulbrights at Johns Hopkins

A record number of Johns Hopkins University students and recent graduates – 19 – have been named Fulbright Scholars, earning the opportunity to travel abroad to such places as Peru, Malaysia and Spain to study, teach and conduct research.

Johns Hopkins Commencement Set for May 18

About 1,500 students will claim their degrees Wednesday, May 18, at the commencement ceremony for all of Johns Hopkins University’s divisions and campuses.

Johns Hopkins Faculty Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Four Johns Hopkins University faculty members are among the new scholars elected to the National Academy of Sciences today in recognition of their “distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.”

Johns Hopkins Announces 2016 Honorary Degree Recipients

An award-winning novelist, a Nobel Prize winner and Maryland’s first woman to become an administrative Circuit Court judge are among eight distinguished achievers who will receive Johns Hopkins University honorary degrees this year.

Tax Prep Chains Target Low-Income Workers

National tax preparation chains continue to exploit the working poor, many of whom spend a significant portion of a key federal anti-poverty tax credit just to pay for filing their taxes, a new study concludes.

Johns Hopkins Art Historian Awarded Guggenheim Fellowship

Mitchell B. Merback, a Johns Hopkins University art historian, is among 178 prominent scholars to win 2016 Fellowships from The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Twenty-five Businesses Team up to Expand Economic Opportunities in Baltimore

A group of Baltimore-area businesses today unveiled a sweeping new plan aimed at harnessing their collective influence to help strengthen the city and create opportunities for Baltimoreans.

Johns Hopkins Increases Investment in Restructured Baltimore Scholars Program

The Johns Hopkins University is proud to announce a shift in its Baltimore Scholars Program to offer greater financial aid and more robust supports to high-achieving Baltimore City Public School graduates with significant financial need.

Spike Lee to Give Commencement Address

Filmmaker Spike Lee, whose acclaimed works including Do The Right Thing and Jungle Fever have challenged assumptions about race and prejudice, will speak at the Johns Hopkins University’s commencement ceremony on May 18.

Johns Hopkins Class of 2020 Chosen From Record Applicant Pool

The Johns Hopkins University has admitted 2,539 students to complete the Class of 2020, high achievers selected from a record regular decision applicant pool of 25,188. These students join 559 future Blue Jays already admitted under the early decision plan.

Evidence of a ‘Ferguson Effect’ on Baltimore Arrests Before Unrest

A “Ferguson effect” likely decelerated arrests in Baltimore well before the April 2015 unrest related to the arrest and death of Freddie Gray, but there is little evidence to suggest it influenced the city’s crime rate, a new report concludes.

Cartoonist Ben Katchor to Speak at Johns Hopkins

Award-winning cartoonist and graphic novelist Ben Katchor will present an illustrated lecture on his work Monday April 4 at Johns Hopkins University.

Scientists Find Brain Cells That Know Which End Is Up

People are intuitive physicists — knowing from birth how objects under the influence of gravity are likely to fall, topple or roll. In a new study, scientists have found the brain cells apparently responsible for this innate wisdom.

What You Know Can Affect How You See

Objects — everything from cars, birds and faces to letters of the alphabet — look significantly different to people familiar with them, scientists have found.

Scientists Find Mastering the Art of Ignoring Makes People More Efficient

People searching for something can find it faster if they know what to look for. But new research suggests knowing what not to look for can be just as helpful.

What Bats Reveal About How Humans Focus Attention

You’re at a crowded party, noisy with multiple conversations, music and clinking glasses. But when someone behind you says your name, you hear it and quickly turn in that direction. The same sort of thing happens with bats and Johns Hopkins University researchers have discovered how a bat’s brain determines what’s worth paying attention to. The findings, which have implications across animal systems, were published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

How Your Brain Might be Secretly Thwarting Your New Year’s Resolutions

The human brain is wired to pay attention to previously pleasing things — a finding that could help explain why it’s hard to break bad habits or stick to New Year’s resolutions.

What Goes Wrong in the Brain When Someone Can’t Spell

By studying stroke victims who have lost the ability to spell, researchers have pinpointed the parts of the brain that control how we write words.

Snowden, ‘Orange is the New Black’ Author Headline JHU Speaker Series

A whistleblower, the author of a bestselling book about life in a women’s prison, and the founder of Vox.com are among those speaking at Johns Hopkins University as part of the 2016 Foreign Affairs Symposium speaker series.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Angela Davis to Speak at Johns Hopkins

Angela Davis, a leading thinker on issues of racial politics and criminal justice reform, will visit Johns Hopkins University as part of the JHU Forums on Race in America.

Department of Labor Official Joins 21st Century Cities Initiative

Ben Seigel, a Baltimore native who helped design the Obama Administration’s place-based strategy and led the federal government’s effort to address deep-rooted issues in Baltimore after last year’s unrest, has joined a Johns Hopkins University project to strengthen cities with similar urban challenges.

Johns Hopkins to Put Cameras in Hands of Baltimore Youth

Young people in Baltimore City will have a chance to express themselves creatively and build their resumes with the launch of Johns Hopkins University’s youth filmmaking program.

Johns Hopkins Welcomes First Members of the Class of 2020

A record number of high school students applied early decision this fall to the Johns Hopkins University, identifying it as their top choice and committing to attend if admitted. The 1,929 applicants represent a 3 percent increase from last year’s early decision pool, which had already seen a 17 percent increase from the prior year.

Why Some People Would Pay for a Drug They Probably Won’t Ever Need

A sick person is obviously willing to pay for a good medical treatment, but a Johns Hopkins University economist and his collaborators finds healthy people are potentially a much broader, if largely overlooked, market for medical innovations.