About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Change-makers Admitted to Johns Hopkins Class of 2021

The Johns Hopkins University has admitted 2,542 students to the Class of 2021 — civic leaders, social activists, and young people already making a mark on their world.

Illustrator Barry Blitt to Speak at Johns Hopkins

Award-winning cartoonist and illustrator Barry Blitt will speak Monday April 3 at Johns Hopkins University.

Johns Hopkins Makes Progress in Goal to Build, Hire and Buy Locally

The Johns Hopkins University and the Johns Hopkins Health System hired 304 workers from Baltimore’s distressed neighborhoods and campus-area communities and committed $55.5 million of construction project spending with minority- and women-owned or disadvantaged businesses in the first year of their HopkinsLocal initiative, according to a progress report released today.

It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s – a Key Discovery About Human Memory

As Superman flies over the city, people on the ground famously suppose they see a bird, then a plane, and then finally realize it’s a superhero. But they haven’t just spotted the Man of Steel – they’ve experienced the ideal conditions to create a very strong memory of him.

Johns Hopkins University cognitive psychologists are the first to link human’s long-term visual memory with how things move. The key, they found, lies in whether we can visually track an object. When people see Superman, they don’t think they’re seeing a bird, a plane and a superhero. They know it’s just one thing – even though the distance, lighting and angle change how he looks.

Panel at Johns Hopkins to Discuss Social Identity Issues

The next event in the JHU Forums on Race in America will feature a panel of scholars and activists discussing how the recognition of multiple, overlapping social identities has a powerful effect on individuals’ daily lives and social movements.

Homewood Museum Director/curator Named

Julia Rose has been appointed the new Director and Curator of Homewood Museum. Rose is currently the director of the West Baton Rouge Museum and an adjunct instructor in museum studies at Louisiana State University. She will begin her new role at Johns Hopkins University on June 1.

Teens in Poorest Families Go Hungry More Than Younger Kids

In very poor families, teenagers are going hungry twice as often as their younger siblings, a new Johns Hopkins University study finds.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Theory for Trump’s Frenetic First Days

Johns Hopkins University political scientist Benjamin Ginsberg offers a possible explanation of the motives behind the flurry of executive orders and presidential memoranda issued during President Donald Trump’s first week in office.

Composer Michael Hersch Wins $250,000 President’s Frontier Award

Johns Hopkins Peabody Institute composer and pianist Michael Hersch, whose groundbreaking work has been performed worldwide, has won the university’s 2017 President’s Frontier Award, an honor that comes with $250,000 for research and innovation.

Pussy Riot Co-founder to Speak at JHU

Activist Nadya Tolokonnikova — a founding member of the all-female, anti-Putin, punk rock artist collective Pussy Riot — will speak at Johns Hopkins University.

Intersession Students Learn the Science Behind Party Food

Beer, wine and cheese are classic party foods that couldn’t be made without fermentation. Fermentation is also the key behind food trends like pickling and the tea drink kombucha. In a one-credit intersession course, Johns Hopkins University undergraduates will learn the chemistry behind this biological process, science that will help them understand when they should send back a bottle of wine, what sets a stout apart from a lager, and why some cheeses ooze while others crumble.

Johns Hopkins Welcomes 1st Members of Class of 2021

A talented pool of high school students applied early decision this fall to the Johns Hopkins University, identifying it as their top choice and committing to attend if admitted.

Johns Hopkins Joins Alliance to Expand College Access For 50,000 Talented Lower-income Students

The Johns Hopkins University is joining 29 other colleges and universities to expand by at least 50,000 the number of talented low- and moderate-income students at the U.S. undergraduate institutions with the highest graduation rates.

Johns Hopkins Senior Named Rhodes Scholar

Johns Hopkins University senior Nicole A. Mihelson has been named a Rhodes Scholar, one of the top awards available to American college students.

ADVISORY: Bernie Sanders to Speak at Johns Hopkins

Bernie Sanders, a U.S. senator and former Democratic presidential candidate, to speak at Johns Hopkins University.

ADVISORY: Dance Marathon Saturday at Johns Hopkins

About 150 Johns Hopkins students are expected to dance all night to raise money to help sick and injured children. Money raised will help support a weekend child life specialist at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center.

When Fish Come to School, Kids Get Hooked on Science

A program that brings live fish into classrooms to teach the fundamentals of biology not only helps students learn, but improves their attitudes about science, a new study finds.

Painter Catherine Kehoe to Speak at Johns Hopkins

Boston-based painter Catherine Kehoe will present slides and discuss her work on Thursday, October 27 at Johns Hopkins University.

ADVISORY: Marilyn Mosby to Speak at Johns Hopkins

Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby, who took office in 2015, and is best known for charging six police officers involved in the arrest of Freddie Gray, will speak at a program called “Unpacking Baltimore with Marilyn Mosby.”

When Washington Doesn’t Get America

Washington doesn’t think very highly of the American people, concludes a yearlong Johns Hopkins University study of 850 non-elected officials working in the nation’s capital.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Prepares for Annual Day of Baltimore Service

Planting, weeding and making lunches for the homeless. These are just some of the ways more than 1,000 Johns Hopkins University students, faculty and staff will try to help the city on Saturday, Sept. 24, as they volunteer en masse at more than 30 Baltimore non-profit organizations.

Kill Them With Cuteness: The Adorable Thing Bats Do to Catch Prey

Bats’ use of echolocation to detect, track and catch prey is well documented. But this Johns Hopkins team is the first to show how the relatively mysterious head and ear movements factor into the hunt.

Researchers Find Brain’s ‘Physics Engine’

Whether or not they aced it in high school, human beings are physics masters when it comes to understanding and predicting how objects in the world will behave. A Johns Hopkins University cognitive scientist has found the source of that intuition, the brain’s “physics engine.”

The Brain’s Super-Sensitivity to Curbs

Humans rely on boundaries like walls and curbs for navigation, and Johns Hopkins University researchers have pinpointed the areas of the brain most sensitive to even the tiniest borders.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Experts Available to Discuss Election Topics

The following Johns Hopkins University experts, whose research focuses on such subjects as race, economic policy, inequality, gun violence, law enforcement and health care, are available for interviews during the presidential election season.