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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Class of 2019 Chosen From Record Applicant Pool

The Johns Hopkins University has admitted 2,525 students to complete the Class of 2019, selected from a record applicant pool of 24,717. These students joined 540 future Blue Jays who have already enrolled at the university under the Early Decision admission plan.

Beverly Wendland Named Dean of Arts and Sciences

Beverly Wendland, a distinguished biologist known for dedication to undergraduate and graduate students, commitment to diversity, and advocacy for innovative teaching and liberal arts education, has been appointed dean of the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences.

Message to the University Community on the Death of a Student

The university sent a message on Monday, Jan. 26, to students, faculty members and staff members at the Homewood campus on the death of Jeremy Huber, a freshman in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. This is the text of that message.

Johns Hopkins Welcomes 1st Members of Class Of 2019

A record number of high school students applied early decision to the Johns Hopkins University this fall, identifying it as their top choice and committing to attend if admitted.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Move-in Day for Class of 2018

A flying trapeze artist. The winner of Delaware’s Young Playwrights Festival three years running. A competitor on “The Biggest Loser” who’s now dedicated to fighting obesity. The creator of an app for cancer patients. A professional skateboarder who writes a food blog. The teacher of a free robotics course for special needs students.

These dynamic students are among Johns Hopkins University’s incoming freshman class who will be moving onto campus this week.

Two Johns Hopkins Researchers Receive Pew Charitable Trusts Awards

Robert J. Johnston, a biologist at The Johns Hopkins University, studying how cells randomly choose their fates during development and Andrew J. Holland, a molecular biologist at the university’s School of Medicine, whose work focuses on how dividing cells create the correct number of centrosomes, have been named Pew scholars for their promising work in the area of health sciences.

Johns Hopkins Dean Named Provost at UMass Amherst

Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels wrote to students, faculty and staff to announce the appointment of Katherine Newman, the James B. Knapp Dean of the university’s Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, as provost of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Meaning Of ‘The American Dream’ Different For Minorities, Whites

In a report published in the new issue of the journal Urban Studies, Johns Hopkins University sociologist Meredith Greif found that while homeownership can spark feelings of pride in people of any race, it’s more meaningful for minorities. But, because blacks and Latinos buy more homes in disadvantaged communities and are less likely to able to move, they ultimately tend to feel dissatisfied with their community — and potentially their purchase.

Walter White’s Biggest Crime: He’s A Bad Teacher

Walter White of “Breaking Bad” sneaks, lies and manipulates – to say nothing of dealing drugs and killing people. But his biggest crime, a Johns Hopkins University professor says, is being a really, really bad teacher. Political scientist Samuel Chambers makes a case in the spring issue of the journal Theory & Event that the true teaching talent on “Breaking Bad,” the one who could inspire and mentor the student, young Jesse Pinkman, was sociopath drug kingpin Gustavo Fring.

Escaping Poor Neighborhoods Can Change A Parent’s Expectations

Despite evidence that people don’t leave impoverished, segregated areas even when offered large housing subsidies, a well-structured voucher program can help inner city residents feel comfortable enough in a more affluent area to want to stay, researchers found.

Are You Smarter Than a 5-Year-Old? Preschoolers Can Do Algebra, Psychologists Find

Millions of high school and college algebra students are united in a shared agony over solving for x and y, and for those to whom the answers don’t come easily, it gets worse: Most preschoolers and kindergarteners can do some algebra before even entering a math class.

Music Pioneer Thomas Dolby Becomes Johns Hopkins Professor

Dolby will also be artistic director of a film center Johns Hopkins is launching along with the Maryland Institute College of Art and the Maryland Film Festival in Station North, Baltimore’s nascent arts and entertainment district. The center will be a key facet of Johns Hopkins’ efforts to revitalize that neighborhood, which is located between the main campus and downtown Baltimore.

Three Johns Hopkins Researchers Selected for Sloan Research Fellowship

A theoretical physicist, a computer scientist and a solid-state chemist at the Johns Hopkins University are 2014 recipients of the Sloan Research Fellowship, given annually to young scientists showing promise in their research areas.

Johns Hopkins Introduces Master of Science in Government Analytics

In an increasingly data-driven world, there is an urgent need for individuals with the analytical skills necessary to address contemporary political, policy and governance issues.

Johns Hopkins Selects Early Decision Students from Record Applicant Pool

The Johns Hopkins University is offering early admission to 526 students from 39 U.S. states and 24 countries into its Class of 2018. The university chose them from a record 1,595 early decision applicants — up 11 percent over last year.

Aid Programs Helped U.S. Survive the Great Recession

The report, published this month in The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, shows the country’s “social safety net” expanded to catch many Americans during the economic downturn, which lasted roughly from 2008 through 2009.

New Report Says Predictive Policing Helps Stop Crime Before It Starts

Police departments across the country are using their own predictive strategies such as algorithms, time/space analysis and social network analysis to become “data detectives” in an effort to stop crime before it starts, according a new report by the Johns Hopkins University Center for Advanced Governmental Studies.

MEDIA ADVISORY: 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington

Lester K. Spence, an expert in racial politics and American political thought, sociologist Katrina Bell McDonald, civil rights historian Nathan Connolly and historian Ronald Walters can discuss the impact of the March on Washington and its modern relevance on its 50th anniversary.

Johns Hopkins Summer Program Hooks Baltimore City Teens on Science

Biophysics Research for Baltimore Teens, a paid summer internship program, aims to give city high school students from low-income communities a head start in science careers by exposing them to the thrills of university-level bio-medical lab work.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins experts available to discuss Supreme Court action on Fisher v. University of Texas

Supreme Court Fisher Decision: Lester K. Spence, an expert in racial politics and American political thought, and Joel Grossman, an expert in constitutional law, can discuss the Supreme Court’s ruling in the Fisher v. University of Texas case.

Johns Hopkins Student Wins Prestigious Pew Fellowship

The fellowship provides support to advance research, enabling winners to study with prominent U.S. scientists and then establish laboratories in their home countries.

A turf battle in the retina helps internal clocks see the light

With every sunrise and sunset, our eyes make note of the light as it waxes and wanes, a process that is critical to aligning our circadian rhythms to match the solar day so we are alert during the day and restful at night. Watching the sun come and go sounds like a peaceful process, but Johns Hopkins scientists have discovered that behind the scenes, millions of specialized cells in our eyes are fighting for their lives to help the retina set the stage to keep our internal clocks ticking.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Horse meat scandal in Europe

Two professors at The Johns Hopkins University are available to discuss the horse meat incident. They say a culinary taboo is a distraction from the real issue: inadequate food inspection regulations.

Johns Hopkins senior Lay Kodama wins Churchill Scholarship

Lay Kodama, a Johns Hopkins University senior from Columbus, Ohio, has been selected as a Churchill Scholar by the Winston Churchill Foundation of the United States. The Churchill Scholarship is awarded to 14 students nationwide who have demonstrated a capacity to contribute to the advancement of knowledge in the sciences, engineering or mathematics by completing original, creative work at an advanced level.

Johns Hopkins University senior Eleanor Gardner is Bermuda’s Rhodes Scholar

Eleanor Gardner, a senior at The Johns Hopkins University, has been named Bermuda’s Rhodes Scholar for 2013. The Rhodes Scholarship is considered one of the most prestigious academic honors, offering all-expenses-paid study for two, and possibly three, years at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. It is given to approximately 80 young adults each year in the English-speaking world, including only one scholar each year from Bermuda.

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