About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

MEDIA ADVISORY: 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington

Lester K. Spence, an expert in racial politics and American political thought, sociologist Katrina Bell McDonald, civil rights historian Nathan Connolly and historian Ronald Walters can discuss the impact of the March on Washington and its modern relevance on its 50th anniversary.

Johns Hopkins Summer Program Hooks Baltimore City Teens on Science

Biophysics Research for Baltimore Teens, a paid summer internship program, aims to give city high school students from low-income communities a head start in science careers by exposing them to the thrills of university-level bio-medical lab work.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins experts available to discuss Supreme Court action on Fisher v. University of Texas

Supreme Court Fisher Decision: Lester K. Spence, an expert in racial politics and American political thought, and Joel Grossman, an expert in constitutional law, can discuss the Supreme Court’s ruling in the Fisher v. University of Texas case.

Johns Hopkins Student Wins Prestigious Pew Fellowship

The fellowship provides support to advance research, enabling winners to study with prominent U.S. scientists and then establish laboratories in their home countries.

A turf battle in the retina helps internal clocks see the light

With every sunrise and sunset, our eyes make note of the light as it waxes and wanes, a process that is critical to aligning our circadian rhythms to match the solar day so we are alert during the day and restful at night. Watching the sun come and go sounds like a peaceful process, but Johns Hopkins scientists have discovered that behind the scenes, millions of specialized cells in our eyes are fighting for their lives to help the retina set the stage to keep our internal clocks ticking.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Horse meat scandal in Europe

Two professors at The Johns Hopkins University are available to discuss the horse meat incident. They say a culinary taboo is a distraction from the real issue: inadequate food inspection regulations.

Johns Hopkins senior Lay Kodama wins Churchill Scholarship

Lay Kodama, a Johns Hopkins University senior from Columbus, Ohio, has been selected as a Churchill Scholar by the Winston Churchill Foundation of the United States. The Churchill Scholarship is awarded to 14 students nationwide who have demonstrated a capacity to contribute to the advancement of knowledge in the sciences, engineering or mathematics by completing original, creative work at an advanced level.

Johns Hopkins University senior Eleanor Gardner is Bermuda’s Rhodes Scholar

Eleanor Gardner, a senior at The Johns Hopkins University, has been named Bermuda’s Rhodes Scholar for 2013. The Rhodes Scholarship is considered one of the most prestigious academic honors, offering all-expenses-paid study for two, and possibly three, years at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. It is given to approximately 80 young adults each year in the English-speaking world, including only one scholar each year from Bermuda.

Johns Hopkins Mathematicians Named Inaugural American Mathematical Society Fellows

Ten Johns Hopkins University mathematicians have been named Fellows of the American Mathematical Society for 2013, the program’s first year. The designation recognizes those who have made outstanding contributions to the creation, exposition, advancement, communication and utilization of mathematics.

Exposure to Light at Night May Cause Depression, Learning Issues, JHU Biologist Says

For most of history, humans rose with the sun and slept when it set. Enter Thomas Edison, and with a flick of a switch, night became day, enabling us to work, play and post cat and kid photos on Facebook into the wee hours. However, according to a new study led by Johns Hopkins biologist Samer Hattar, this typical 21st- century scenario comes at a serious cost: When people routinely burn the midnight oil, they risk suffering depression and learning issues, and not only because of lack of sleep. The culprit could also be exposure to bright light at night from lamps, computers and even iPads.

JHU’s Ménard named “Maryland’s Outstanding Young Scientist of 2012” by the Maryland Academy of Sciences

Astrophysicist Brice Ménard of the Johns Hopkins University has been selected by the Maryland Academy of Sciences as the Outstanding Young Scientist of 2012. He received the award at a ceremony to be held at the Maryland Science Center yesterday. Ménard, an assistant professor in the Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy, was recognized for his research in extragalactic astrophysics and cosmology.

Royal Society Research Professor to Give Annual Benton Lecture at Johns Hopkins

October 17, 2012 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE MEDIA CONTACT:  Lisa De Nike (443)-287-9960 (office) (443) 845-3148 (cell) Lde@jhu.edu Andrew Watson, a Royal Society research professor who studies the carbon cycle and its connection climate change, will give the George S. Benton Endowed Lecture in Meteorology and Fluid Dynamics at The Johns Hopkins University at 4 p.m. […]

Johns Hopkins Chemist Wins Packard Fellowship

Johns Hopkins University chemist Tyrel McQueen has been awarded a 2012 David and Lucile Packard Foundation Fellowship for Science and Engineering. The fellowship is one of 16 awarded each year nationwide, and bestows unrestricted funds of $875,000 (over a five-year period) to unusually creative young faculty members in science and engineering.

Johns Hopkins Astrophysicist Spies Ultra-Distant Galaxy Amidst Cosmic ‘Dark Ages’

With the combined power of NASA’s Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes as well as a cosmic magnification effect, a team of astronomers led by Wei Zheng of The Johns Hopkins University has spotted what could be the most distant galaxy ever seen. Light of the young galaxy captured by the orbiting observatories shone forth when the 13.7-billion-year-old universe was just 500 million years old. The far-off galaxy existed within an important era when the universe began to transit from the so-called “Dark Ages.” During this period, the universe went from a dark, starless expanse to a recognizable cosmos full of galaxies. The discovery of the faint, small galaxy accordingly opens up a window into the deepest, remotest epochs of cosmic history.

“This galaxy is the most distant object we have ever observed with high confidence,” said Zheng, a principal research scientist in The Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins’ Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and lead author of a new paper appearing in Nature tomorrow. “Future work involving this galaxy – as well as others like it that we hope to find – will allow us to study the universe’s earliest objects and how the Dark Ages ended.”

Children of immigrants are coming out ahead of their peers

Children of immigrants are outperforming children whose family trees have deeper roots in the United States, learning more in school and then making smoother transitions into adulthood, according to sociologists at The Johns Hopkins University.

Johns Hopkins and MICA Team Up to Create Retro Lab Safety Posters

Remember those eye-popping posters with the neon colors and bold type that promoted 1960s and 1970s concerts of such music greats as James Brown, Etta James, B.B. King and Otis Redding? Well, they’re back, this time to educate students about the importance of safety when working in research laboratories.

McIntosh Named Dean of Academic Services at Johns Hopkins

Joshua G. McIntosh, an experienced administrator who has devoted his career to enriching all aspects of university student life, has been named Dean of Academic Services at The Johns Hopkins University. McIntosh, currently associate dean at Harvard University’s Harvard College, will join Johns Hopkins in the newly created post on August 6.

They Were What They Ate: Study Reveals Pre-Human Relatives Ate Only Forest Foods

You are what you eat, and that seems to have been as true two million years ago, when our pre-human relatives were swinging through the trees and racing across the savannas of South Africa, as it is today. A study done by a team that included Johns Hopkins University geochemist Benjamin Passey and published in today’s issue of the journal Nature reveals that Australopithecus sediba, an ape-like creature with human features living in a region about 50 miles northwest of today’s Johannesburg, exclusively consumed fruits, leaves and other forest-based foods, even though its habitat was near grassy savanna with its rich variety of savory sedges, tasty tubers and even juicy animals.

Johns Hopkins’ Bennett and WMAP Team Awarded the 2012 Gruber Cosmology Prize

The Gruber Foundation announced today that the 2012 Cosmology Prize will be awarded to Johns Hopkins University professor Charles L. Bennett and the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) space mission science team that he led. Bennett and the WMAP team are being recognized by the foundation for their transformative study of an ancient light dating back to the infant universe. So precise and accurate are the WMAP results that they form the foundation of the Standard Cosmological Model.

When Pomp and Circumstance Collide: College Graduates and the March Back Home

This month, thousands of college graduates are walking across the stage to shake hands, smile for the camera, and pick up their diplomas. Many of those newly minted American college graduates are moving out of their dorm rooms and back into their childhood bedrooms, according to Johns Hopkins University sociologist Katherine Newman, author of “The Accordion Family: Boomerang Kids, Anxious Parents, and the Private Toll of Global Competition” (Beacon Press, January 2012).

Reducing Brain Activity Improves Memory After Cognitive Decline, Johns Hopkins Team Finds

A study led by Michela Gallagher of The Johns Hopkins University and published in the May 10 issue of the journal Neuron suggests a potential new therapeutic approach for improving memory and interrupting disease progression in patients with a form of cognitive impairment that often leads to full-blown Alzheimer’s disease.

Team Led By JHU Astrophysicist Catches Black Hole Red-Handed in Stellar Homicide

Astronomers have gathered the most direct evidence yet of a supermassive black hole shredding a star that wandered too close. Astronomers have spotted these stellar homicides before, but this is the first time they can identify the victim. Using a slew of ground- and space-based telescopes, a team of astronomers led by Suvi Gezari of The Johns Hopkins University has identified the victim as a star rich in helium gas. The star resides in a galaxy 2.7 billion light-years away. Her team’s results will appear in the May 3 online edition of the journal Nature.

Newly Discovered Foot Points to a New Kid on the Hominin Block

It seems that “Lucy” was not the only hominin on the block in northern Africa about 3 million years ago. A team of researchers that included Johns Hopkins University geologist Naomi Levin has announced the discovery of a partial foot skeleton with characteristics (such as an opposable big toe bone) that don’t match those of Lucy, the human ancestor (or hominin) known to inhabit that region and considered by many to be the ancestor of all modern humans.

Johns Hopkins Physicist Honored With Simons Fellowship

A Johns Hopkins University theoretical physicist has been awarded a Simons Fellowship in Physics, which provides scholars with the opportunity to spend a year away from classroom and administrative duties in order to pursue research interests. Mark Robbins, a professor in the Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy at the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences at The Johns Hopkins University, is among 27 theoretical physicists to receive this highly competitive, honorific fellowship.

Johns Hopkins Mathematicians Honored With Simons Fellowships

Two Johns Hopkins University mathematicians each have been awarded the very competitive Simons Fellowship in Mathematics, which provides scholars with the opportunity to spend a semester away from classroom and administrative duties in order to pursue their research interests. Christopher Sogge and Joel Spruck, both professors in the Department of Mathematics in the Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, are among just 50 mathematicians in North America to receive this highly competitive, honorific fellowship.