About Johns Hopkins
Johns Hopkins University

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Material Scientist Tim Mueller Receives NSF CAREER Award

Tim Mueller, a Johns Hopkins University assistant professor of materials science and engineering, has been selected by the National Science Foundation to receive its prestigious CAREER Award, which recognizes the highest level of excellence and promise in early-stage scholars. His faculty appointment is within the university’s Whiting School of Engineering.

Biosensor Could Help Detect Brain Injuries During Heart Surgery

Johns Hopkins engineers and cardiology experts have teamed up to develop a fingernail-sized biosensor that could alert doctors when serious brain injury occurs during heart surgery. By doing so, the device could help doctors devise new ways to minimize brain damage or begin treatment more quickly. In the Nov. 11 issue of the journal Chemical Science, the team reported on lab tests demonstrating that the prototype sensor had successfully detected a protein associated with brain injuries.

Tiny Bubbles in Your Metallic Glass May Not Be a Cause for Celebration

Bubbles in a champagne glass may add a festive fizz to the drink, but microscopic bubbles that form in a material called metallic glass can signal serious trouble. In this normally high-strength material, bubbles may indicate that a brittle breakdown is in progress. That’s why Johns Hopkins researchers used computer simulations to study how these bubbles form and expand when a piece of metallic glass is pulled outward by negative pressure, such as the suction produced by a vacuum.

Scientists Discover That Shape Matters in DNA Nanoparticle Therapy

Researchers from Johns Hopkins and Northwestern universities have discovered how to control the shape of nanoparticles that move DNA through the body and have shown that the shapes of these carriers may make a big difference in how well they work in treating cancer and other diseases.

Air Force Launches New Center at Johns Hopkins to Advance Structural Materials and Design for Aerospace Applications

The U.S. Air Force has selected a team led by Johns Hopkins engineers to start a new materials research center of excellence that will develop novel computational and experimental methods to support the next generation of military aircraft. The Center of Excellence on Integrated Material Modeling, CEIMM, will advance the Computational Integrated Materials Science and Engineering Initiative, which focuses on materials applications within a digital framework.

Collagen-Seeking Synthetic Protein Could Lead Doctors to Tumor Locations

Johns Hopkins researchers have created a synthetic protein that, when activated by ultraviolet light, can guide doctors to places within the body where cancer, arthritis and other serious medical disorders can be detected. The technique could lead to a new type of diagnostic imaging technology and may someday serve as a way to move medications to parts of the body where signs of disease have been found.

Thanks for the Memory: Researchers Find Room for More Data Storage in ‘Phase-Change’ Material

A team led by Johns Hopkins engineers has discovered some previously unknown properties of a common memory material, paving the way for development of new forms of memory drives, movie discs and computer systems that retain data more quickly, last longer and allow far more capacity than current data storage media.

Materials Scientist Seeks Dwarfism Clues in a Cell’s Membrane

Achondroplasia, a common form of dwarfism, is caused by a genetic mutation: A single incorrect building block in a strand of DNA produces a defective protein that disrupts normal growth. If a scientist could figure out precisely how this errant protein causes trouble, then a way to avert this chain of events might be found. Sounds like a job for a biologist. Or maybe not. The person who cracks this mutation mystery might just be a Johns Hopkins engineer who works with cell membranes.

Stressed Nanomaterials Display Unexpected Movement

Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered that, under the right conditions, newly developed nanocrystalline materials exhibit surprising activity in the tiny spaces between the geometric clusters of atoms called nanocrystals, from which they are made.

Seven Johns Hopkins Researchers Named AAAS Fellows

Seven Johns Hopkins researchers from four of the university’s schools have been elected by their peers as fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Pierre A. Coulombe, Ph.D., and Marcelo Jacobs-Lorena, Ph.D, of the Bloomberg School of Public Health; David Draper, Ph.D., of the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences; David J. Linden, Ph.D., and Cynthia Wolberger, Ph.D., of the School of Medicine; and Peter C. Searson, Ph.D., and Denis Wirtz, Ph.D. of the Whiting School of Engineering; are among 531 new fellows around the world. Election as a fellow honors their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.

events calendar
click to view events calendar
browse Johns Hopkins A-Z
click to browse
on the web
  • click for hopkins on Facebook
  • click for hopkins on Twitter
  • click for hopkins on YouTube
  • click for hopkins music