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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Reducing Brain Activity Improves Memory After Cognitive Decline, Johns Hopkins Team Finds

A study led by Michela Gallagher of The Johns Hopkins University and published in the May 10 issue of the journal Neuron suggests a potential new therapeutic approach for improving memory and interrupting disease progression in patients with a form of cognitive impairment that often leads to full-blown Alzheimer’s disease.

Drug Improves Brain Function in Condition that Leads to Alzheimer’s

An existing anti-seizure drug improves memory and brain function in adults with a form of cognitive impairment that often leads to full-blown Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study led by neuroscientist Michela Gallagher of The Johns Hopkins University. The findings raise the possibility that doctors will someday be able to use the drug, levetiracetam, already approved for use in epilepsy patients, to slow the abnormal loss of brain function in some aging patients before their condition becomes Alzheimer’s.

New Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs at Johns Hopkins University

Lloyd B. Minor, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, sent a broadcast e-mail message to faculty and staff members at The Johns Hopkins University on Thursday, June 23, announcing that Dr. Michela Gallagher would be stepping down as Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, and that Dr. Barbara Landau would succeed Gallagher in a refocused position as Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs.

Hard Work Improves the Taste of Food, Johns Hopkins Study Finds

It’s commonly accepted that we appreciate something more if we have to work hard to get it, and a Johns Hopkins study bears that out, at least when it comes to food. The study — led by Johns Hopkins psychologist Alexander Johnson — seems to suggest that hard work can even enhance our appreciation for fare we might not favor, such as the low-fat, low calorie variety. At least in theory, this means that if we had to navigate an obstacle course to get to a plate of baby carrots, we might come to prefer those crunchy crudités over the sweet, gooey Snickers bars or Peanut M&Ms more easily accessible via the office vending machine. The study appeared this week in the Proceedings of the Royal Academy B.

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