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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

How Do Energy Policies and Climate Change Affect Air Quality—and Our Health?

A new interdisciplinary science team, led by experts from Yale and Johns Hopkins universities and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, will try to figure how power generation trends, climate change and public policy interact to affect air quality. A key goal is to trace how the resulting changes in air pollution may affect the health of people who live and work in the mid-Atlantic area.

Johns Hopkins Biologist Scott Bailey Receives $250,000 President’s Frontier Award

A public health biologist who is trying to stop the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and pave the way to new treatments for genetic diseases has received the 2016 President’s Frontier Award, a Johns Hopkins University honor that provides $250,000 in research funding. The program was launched last year as part of an expanded university effort to provide more funding to help its faculty move forward with innovative research projects. This year’s recipient is Scott Bailey, an associate professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, within the university’s Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Using Twitter to Track the Flu: Researchers Find a Better Way to Screen the Tweets

Sifting through social media messages has become a popular way to track when and where flu cases occur, but a key hurdle hampers the process: how to identify flu-infection tweets. Some tweets are posted by people who have been sick with the virus, while others come from folks who are merely talking about the illness. If you are tracking actual flu cases, such conversations about the flu in general can skew the results. To address this problem, Johns Hopkins computer scientists and researchers in the School of Medicine have developed a new tweet-screening method that not only delivers real-time data on flu cases, but also filters out online chatter that is not linked to actual flu infections.

Johns Hopkins Researchers in Robotics, Public Health to Receive Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers

Three Johns Hopkins faculty members, who study robotics, biostatistics and international health, are among 94 researchers selected this year to receive the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. The awards, announced this week by President Barack Obama, are the United States government’s highest honor for scientists and engineers in the early stages of their independent research careers.

You Are What You Tweet: Tracking Public Health Trends from Twitter Messages

Twitter allows millions of social media fans to comment in 140 characters or less on just about anything: an actor’s outlandish behavior, an earthquake’s tragic toll or the great taste of a grilled cheese sandwich. But by sifting through this busy flood of banter, is it possible to also track important public health trends? Two Johns Hopkins University computer scientists would respond with a one-word tweet: “Yes!”

New Johns Hopkins Institute Studies Environment, Energy, Sustainability and Health

Drawing on faculty expertise in environmental science and engineering, public health and other areas, The Johns Hopkins University has launched an Environment, Energy, Sustainability and Health Institute to promote research and education in topics ranging from green energy practices to climate change and related health issues.

Johns Hopkins Offers Major on Global Climate Change, Sustainability

In an effort to provide tomorrow’s leaders with the tools needed to address both the science and policy issues confronting a world facing global climate change, Johns Hopkins’ Krieger School of Arts and Sciences has created an interdisciplinary major and minor in global environmental change and sustainability.