About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

How Recent Economy Kept Black, White Young Adults From Leaving Nest

The economically tumultuous last decade convinced many young people to keep living with their parents, but the reasons why differ starkly by race, concludes a new Johns Hopkins University-led study.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Conference to Explore Race, Segregation and Inequality

Race & Inequality in America: The Kerner Commission at 50. A conference featuring dozens of scholars and experts exploring race, segregation, and inequality 50 years after the release of the historic Kerner Commission Report.

‘Race at the Movies’ Expert Available

Mark Christian Thompson, a Johns Hopkins University English professor who this semester taught a course “Race at the Movies,” is available to talk to reporters looking for movie analysis and award-season commentary.

Advisory: JHU Experts Can Discuss Race, Political movements, Inequality

The following Johns Hopkins University experts — political scientists, economists, historians and sociologists — are available for interviews on topics of race, inequality and political movements:

Study: Black and White Kids Faring Equally in Subsidized Housing

Once-formidable disparities between black and white families living in subsidized housing have largely vanished, and black and white children who grew up in such housing fared similarly in school, jobs and earnings, finds a new Johns Hopkins University study. However, one troubling difference remains between black and white families in assisted housing — neighborhood quality. Black families getting subsidized housing are about nine time more likely than whites to live in segregated, impoverished neighborhoods, the study found.

With Just One Black Teacher, Black Students More Likely to Graduate

Low-income black students who have at least one black teacher in elementary school are significantly more likely to graduate high school and consider attending college, concludes a new study co-authored by a Johns Hopkins University economist.

MEDIA ADVISORY: JHU Forums on Race in America Continue

JHU Forums on Race in America return for the 2016-17 academic year with a panel discussion, “The Next 50 years: Black Power’s Afterlife and the Struggle for Social Justice,” featuring writer and historian Robin Kelley, Baltimore-based political organizer Dayvon Love, and Salamishah Tillet, a scholar, activist, social critic, and media personality.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Experts Available to Discuss Election Topics

The following Johns Hopkins University experts, whose research focuses on such subjects as race, economic policy, inequality, gun violence, law enforcement and health care, are available for interviews during the presidential election season.

Race Biases Teachers’ Expectations for Students

When evaluating the same black student, white teachers expect significantly less academic success than black teachers, a new Johns Hopkins University study concludes. This is especially true for black boys.

Statement from President Daniels on Diversity at Johns Hopkins University

Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels sent a message to the university community on Friday, Nov. 13, concerning protests at colleges and universities across the country and issues of race, diversity and inclusion at Johns Hopkins. This is the text of the message.

If You Made Money Buying a 1st Home in the 2000s, You Probably Weren’t Black

In a study recently published in the journal Real Estate Economics, public policy professor Sandra J. Newman and researcher C. Scott Holupka found that race was a key determinate of which low and moderate-income people who bought first homes during the decade made money. During the Great Recession, white homebuyers lost money but black ones lost considerably more. Even during the boom years, when white buyers increased their wealth by 50 percent, black buyers lost 47 percent of their wealth.