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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins experts available to discuss Supreme Court action on Fisher v. University of Texas

Supreme Court Fisher Decision: Lester K. Spence, an expert in racial politics and American political thought, and Joel Grossman, an expert in constitutional law, can discuss the Supreme Court’s ruling in the Fisher v. University of Texas case.

New Campus Accelerator Aims to Turn High-Tech Ideas into Businesses

The Johns Hopkins University is set to unveil FastForward, a groundbreaking business accelerator that promises to spark cutting-edge technology companies and then keep them in the city to bolster the local economy. The university’s Whiting School of Engineering launched FastForward to help turn the best ideas born on campus into moneymaking ventures. The university’s first accelerator is located in the historic Stieff Silver building on the north side of Baltimore near the Homewood campus.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins FastForward Accelerator Grand Opening Set

The Johns Hopkins University is set to unveil FastForward, a groundbreaking business accelerator that promises to spark cutting-edge technology companies and then keep them in the city to bolster the local economy. The university’s Whiting School of Engineering launched FastForward to help turn the best ideas born on campus into moneymaking ventures. Four fledgling companies have already moved into the building.

Exposure to Light at Night May Cause Depression, Learning Issues, JHU Biologist Says

For most of history, humans rose with the sun and slept when it set. Enter Thomas Edison, and with a flick of a switch, night became day, enabling us to work, play and post cat and kid photos on Facebook into the wee hours. However, according to a new study led by Johns Hopkins biologist Samer Hattar, this typical 21st- century scenario comes at a serious cost: When people routinely burn the midnight oil, they risk suffering depression and learning issues, and not only because of lack of sleep. The culprit could also be exposure to bright light at night from lamps, computers and even iPads.

JHU Physicist Inaugural Winner of 2012 Prize of the Asian Union of Magnetics Societies

Chia-Ling Chien, the Jacob L. Hain Professor of Physics and the Director of the Material Research Science and Engineering Center at The Johns Hopkins University, is a winner of the first-ever Asian Union of Magnetic Societies Award, recognizing his “seminal contribution to magnetic materials, nanostructures, magnetoelectronic phenomena and devices.”

Royal Society Research Professor to Give Annual Benton Lecture at Johns Hopkins

October 17, 2012 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE MEDIA CONTACT:  Lisa De Nike (443)-287-9960 (office) (443) 845-3148 (cell) Lde@jhu.edu Andrew Watson, a Royal Society research professor who studies the carbon cycle and its connection climate change, will give the George S. Benton Endowed Lecture in Meteorology and Fluid Dynamics at The Johns Hopkins University at 4 p.m. [...]

Johns Hopkins Chemist Wins Packard Fellowship

Johns Hopkins University chemist Tyrel McQueen has been awarded a 2012 David and Lucile Packard Foundation Fellowship for Science and Engineering. The fellowship is one of 16 awarded each year nationwide, and bestows unrestricted funds of $875,000 (over a five-year period) to unusually creative young faculty members in science and engineering.

Johns Hopkins Receives $7.4 Million Grant to Boost STEM Education in Baltimore City

Supported by a five-year $7.4 million National Science Foundation grant, experts at The Johns Hopkins University are partnering with teachers and administrators in Baltimore City Public Schools on a program to enhance teaching and learning in science, technology, engineering and math in city elementary schools by making STEM a community affair. The program, called STEM Achievement in Baltimore Elementary Schools – SABES for short — not only will benefit more than 1,600 students in grades three through five in nine city elementary schools, but could also become a national model for science, technology, engineering and math education.

Johns Hopkins Biologist Joel Schildbach Selected as PULSE Leadership Fellow

A Johns Hopkins biologist has been selected by the Partnership for Undergraduate Life Sciences (PULSE) as one its new Vision and Change Leadership Fellows, a group charged with spending a year identifying and recommending ways to improve undergraduate life sciences education. Joel Schildbach, a biology professor and director of undergraduate studies at Johns Hopkins’ Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, is one of 40 faculty members selected from 250 applicants from 24 states and the U.S. Virgin Islands by PULSE, a joint initiative of the National Science Foundation, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the National Institutes of Health.

Johns Hopkins’ Bennett and WMAP Team Awarded the 2012 Gruber Cosmology Prize

The Gruber Foundation announced today that the 2012 Cosmology Prize will be awarded to Johns Hopkins University professor Charles L. Bennett and the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) space mission science team that he led. Bennett and the WMAP team are being recognized by the foundation for their transformative study of an ancient light dating back to the infant universe. So precise and accurate are the WMAP results that they form the foundation of the Standard Cosmological Model.

Media Advisory: Observe the Transit of Venus at Johns Hopkins University Astrophysics Event

The Maryland Space Grant Observatory and Johns Hopkins University are inviting star gazers of every experience level to an event that not only will allow them to view the transit, but also to learn more about it, beginning at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, June 5 at the Bloomberg Center for Physics and Astronomy, 3799 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, 21218.

Reducing Brain Activity Improves Memory After Cognitive Decline, Johns Hopkins Team Finds

A study led by Michela Gallagher of The Johns Hopkins University and published in the May 10 issue of the journal Neuron suggests a potential new therapeutic approach for improving memory and interrupting disease progression in patients with a form of cognitive impairment that often leads to full-blown Alzheimer’s disease.

Exhibit and Website Highlight the Vital Role of Blacks at Johns Hopkins

An exhibit designed to recognize and publicize the crucial role that black students, faculty and staff have played in the rich history of The Johns Hopkins University has opened on the Homewood campus in Charles Village and will circulate among the various Johns Hopkins campuses through fall. Called “The Indispensable Role of Blacks at Johns Hopkins,” the freestanding display and set of window decals pay tribute to 50 people, past and present, whose professional and personal achievements have brought honor to the institution.

Team Led By JHU Astrophysicist Catches Black Hole Red-Handed in Stellar Homicide

Astronomers have gathered the most direct evidence yet of a supermassive black hole shredding a star that wandered too close. Astronomers have spotted these stellar homicides before, but this is the first time they can identify the victim. Using a slew of ground- and space-based telescopes, a team of astronomers led by Suvi Gezari of The Johns Hopkins University has identified the victim as a star rich in helium gas. The star resides in a galaxy 2.7 billion light-years away. Her team’s results will appear in the May 3 online edition of the journal Nature.

Johns Hopkins First in R&D Expenditures for 32nd Year

The Johns Hopkins University performed $2 billion in medical, science and engineering research in fiscal 2010, making it the leading U.S. academic institution in total research and development spending for the 32nd year in a row, according to a new National Science Foundation ranking. The university also once again ranked first on the NSF’s separate list of federally funded research and development, spending $1.73 billion in FY2010 on research supported by NSF, NASA, the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Defense.

Johns Hopkins Mathematicians Honored With Simons Fellowships

Two Johns Hopkins University mathematicians each have been awarded the very competitive Simons Fellowship in Mathematics, which provides scholars with the opportunity to spend a semester away from classroom and administrative duties in order to pursue their research interests. Christopher Sogge and Joel Spruck, both professors in the Department of Mathematics in the Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, are among just 50 mathematicians in North America to receive this highly competitive, honorific fellowship.

Johns Hopkins University Offers New Minor in Space Science and Engineering

Students dreaming of careers searching for life on other planets or monitoring global climate change remotely from satellites will be interested in a new interdisciplinary minor being offered at The Johns Hopkins University. Accessed through the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and the Whiting School of Engineering, the new space science and engineering minor is designed to prepare students to enter careers in the aerospace industry or professional laboratories, or to enter graduate programs.

Sheridan Libraries Announce Completion of Afro American Newspaper Digital Archive Project

The Sheridan Libraries’ Center for Educational Resources (CER) announced today the launch of an online database (http://morgue.afro.com/AfroArchon/) describing the archival materials held by the Afro American Newspaper. The three-year project, administered jointly by CER and the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences’ Center for Africana Studies, was funded with a $476,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Johns Hopkins Biophysicist Wins Humboldt Research Award

George D. Rose, a biophysicist at The Johns Hopkins University, has been awarded a Humboldt Research Award by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in Germany.

Johns Hopkins Astrophysicist Wins Sloan Fellowship

Astrophysicist Brice Ménard of The Johns Hopkins has won a 2012 Sloan Research Fellowship to further support his research on extragalactic astrophysics and cosmology.

JHU Scientist Wins NSF Int’l Science & Engineering Visualization Challenge

They say that a picture is worth a thousand words, and in the case of an image created by astrophysicist Miguel Angel Aragon of The Johns Hopkins University, the adage holds true. His vibrant computer illustration, which won the National Science Foundation’s 2011 Science and Engineering’s Visualization Challenge in the “Informational Posters and Graphics” category, brings to vivid life many dynamic aspects of the universe, spanning 240 million light years.

Team of Scientists Announce Birth of a Baby Crystal

Working together, experimental and computational scientists at The Johns Hopkins University and McNeese State University in Louisiana have determined that for lead sulfide, the smallest nano-crystal (cluster) with the same structural (coordination) properties as the bulk occurs when 32 units of lead sulfide, PbS, molecules assemble together. Their results were published in the Journal of Chemical Physics and The Virtual Journal of Nanoscale Science & Technology.

New Show Invites Visitors to “Please Touch” and Hold

At the “Touch and the Enjoyment of Sculpture: Exploring the Appeal of Renaissance Statuettes” exhibition — an exhibition at the Walters Art Museum through April 15 – visitors are invited to disregard the usual rule against touching. In fact, handling the objects d’arts – which include replicas of famous 16th century statuettes that are part of the Walters’ collection – is one of the reasons behind the exhibition, explains neuroscientist Steven Hsiao of the Johns Hopkins Brain Science Institute, which is partnering with the Walters on this show – the fourth in a series of projects between the museum and Johns Hopkins.

Time for a Change? Johns Hopkins Scholars Say Calendar Needs Serious Overhaul

Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University have discovered a way to make time stand still — at least when it comes to the yearly calendar. Using computer programs and mathematical formulas, Richard Conn Henry, an astrophysicist in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and Steve H. Hanke, an applied economist in the Whiting School of Engineering, have created a new calendar in which each new 12-month period is identical to the one which came before, and remains that way from one year to the next in perpetuity.

Adam Riess of Johns Hopkins Accepts 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics

Adam Riess, a professor in physics and astronomy at The Johns Hopkins University and a research scientist at the Space Telescope Science Institute, today accepted the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences during a ceremony in Stockholm, Sweden.

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