About Johns Hopkins

 

Return to News Releases

Johns Hopkins Mathematician Shares Veblen Prize

January 14, 2009
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MEDIA CONTACT: Lisa De Nike
443-287-9960
Lde@jhu.edu

William P. Minicozzi II, Krieger-Eisenhower Professor in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences at The Johns Hopkins University, will receive the 2010 American Mathematical Society’s Oswald Veblen Prize in Geometry on Thursday, Jan. 14 at the Joint Mathematics Meetings in San Francisco.

Minicozzi

William P. Minicozzi II

Minicozzi is being honored with co-author Tobias H. Colding of the Massachusetts Institute for Technology for a series of papers in the Annals of Mathematics, in which they developed a new structure theory for embedded minimal surfaces. According to a statement by the American Mathematical Society, the team’s research “led to the resolution of long-standing conjectures and initiated a wave of new results.”

“I am greatly honored to be awarded the Veblen prize,” said Minicozzi, who earned his Ph.D. in mathematics at Stanford University and came to Johns Hopkins in 1994 and became Krieger-Eisenhower Professor of Mathematics in 2007. “I have especially enjoyed working with my collaborator, Toby Colding, and it is very satisfying to see this work recognized. I also greatly appreciate the support of my colleagues at Johns Hopkins, especially that of Bernie Shiffman, Chris Sogge, Joel Spruck and Steve Zelditch early in my career.”

Also sharing the Veblen Prize, for work separate from that of Colding and Minicozzi, is Paul Seidel of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The Veblen Prize was established in 1961 in honor of Oswald Veblen, who taught mathematics at Princeton University from 1905 to 1932. Veblen made important contributions in projective and differential geometries, including results considered important in modern physics. the $5,000 prize is awarded every three years in recognition of notable research in geometry or topology that has been published within the preceding six years.

The full citation for this prize and additional information can be found in the Prize Booklet, at http://www.ams.org/ams/prizebooklet-2010.pdf

Find out more about AMS prizes at http://www.ams.org/prizes-awards.

For more information on Minicozzi:  http://www.mathematics.jhu.edu/minicozzi/

###

Johns Hopkins University news releases can be found on the World Wide Web at http://www.jhu.edu/news_info/news/. Information on automatic E-mail delivery of science and medical news releases is available at the same address.


Office of Communications
Johns Hopkins University
3910 Keswick Road, Suite N2600
Baltimore, Maryland 21211
Phone: 443-997-9009 | Fax: 443 997-1006