About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

JHU Undergrads Win $250,000 Prize in Global Mask Design Challenge

A Johns Hopkins University team of 24 undergraduate students that’s come up with a clear, adaptable face mask has won the Future Forward Award in a global challenge to design a better mask.

Vaccine Tracker Now Available on Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center

Johns Hopkins University’s Coronavirus Resource Center has launched a tracking tool to offer daily updates and nationwide perspective on the progress of the COVID-19 vaccination rollout in the United States.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Adds County-Level Hospital, ICU Occupancy Data to Coronavirus Resource Center

To offer perspective on how the nation’s hospitals are managing the surge of COVID-19 patients, the Johns Hopkins University Coronavirus Resource Center is now tracking county-level hospital occupancy data, with fresh updates every day.

This is Your Brain on Code: JHU Deciphers Neural Mechanics of Computer Programming

By mapping the brain activity of expert computer programmers while they puzzled over code, Johns Hopkins University scientists have found the neural mechanics behind this increasingly vital skill.

Johns Hopkins Develops Potential Antibiotic For Drug-Resistant Pathogen

Scientists from Johns Hopkins University and Medicine have developed a possible new antibiotic for a pathogen that is notoriously resistant to medications and frequently lethal for people with cystic fibrosis and other lung ailments.

JHU Undergrads Finalists in Global Mask Design Challenge

A Johns Hopkins University team of 24 undergraduate students that’s come up with a clear, adaptable face mask is among five finalists in a global challenge to design a better mask.

Johns Hopkins Team Develops Software That Cuts Time, Cost From Gene Sequencing

A team of Johns Hopkins University researchers has developed a new software that could revolutionize how DNA is sequenced, making it far faster and less expensive to map anything from yeast genomes to cancer genes.

Johns Hopkins 2018 Grad Named Rhodes Scholar

Vijayasundaram Ramasamy, a public health studies major who graduated from Johns Hopkins University in 2018 and led the team drafting the state of Kansas’ COVID-19 reopening plan, has been named a Rhodes Scholar, one of the top awards available to American college students.

TIME Names Coronavirus Resource Center a Top Invention of 2020

TIME named the Johns Hopkins University’s Coronavirus Resource Center, a website that has helped the world better understand and track the COVID-19 pandemic, to its list of 2020 Best Inventions, calling it “2020’s Go-To Data Source.”

Johns Hopkins Announces New COVID-19 Bi-Weekly Briefings

With the pandemic surging to record levels in the United States, Johns Hopkins University’s Coronavirus Resource Center will launch bi-weekly webcast briefings featuring updates and insights from the university’s top COVID-19 experts beginning this Friday, November 20.

ADVISORY: New Tool Offers County-Level Insight Into COVID-19 Impact

The Johns Hopkins University Coronavirus Resource Center has launched a new tool on its U.S. state tracking pages that provides county-level insight into the effects of COVID-19 through case and testing data measured against key demographic information, including race and poverty level. The Coronavirus Resource Center is the first to publish such a compilation of at the county level.

Galaxies Have Gotten Hotter As They’ve Gotten Older

Researchers from Johns Hopkins University and other institutions have found that, on average, the temperature of galaxy clusters today is 4 million degrees Fahrenheit. That is 10 times hotter than 10 billion years ago, and four times hotter than the Sun’s outermost atmosphere called the corona. The findings are published in the Astrophysical Journal.

Brain Region Tracking Food Preferences Could Steer Our Food Choices

Researchers discovered that a specific brain region monitors food preferences as they change across thirsty and quenched states. By targeting neurons in that part of the brain, they were able to shift food choice preferences from a more desired reward (think: chocolate cake) to a less tasty one (think: stale bread).

Bats Can Predict the Future, JHU Researchers Discover

They can’t tell fortunes and they’re useless with the stock market but bats are quite skilled at predicting one thing: where to find dinner.

Bats calculate where their prey is headed by building on-the-fly predictive models of target motion from echoes, Johns Hopkins University researchers find. The models are so robust, bats can continue to track prey even when it temporarily vanishes behind echo-blocking obstacles like trees.

JHU Team’s Acoustic Sensor Wins Runner-Up Award in Inventors Competition

A team of Johns Hopkins University graduate students that invented a sensor that ignores background noise and could improve everything from telemedicine to Zoom calls has won the Runner-Up Award in the Collegiate Inventors Competition.

Dog Training Methods Help JHU Teach Robots to Learn New Tricks

With a training technique commonly used to teach dogs to sit and stay, Johns Hopkins University computer scientists showed a robot how to teach itself several new tricks, including stacking blocks. With the method, the robot, named Spot, was able to learn in days what typically takes a month.

Researchers Discover ‘Spooky’ Similarity In How Brains and Computers See

The brain detects 3D shape fragments (bumps, hollows, shafts, spheres) in the beginning stages of object vision – a newly discovered strategy of natural intelligence that Johns Hopkins University researchers also found in artificial intelligence networks trained to recognize visual objects.

New Test Can Target and Capture Most Lethal Cells in Fatal Brain Cancer

A laboratory test developed by a research team led by Johns Hopkins University bioengineers can accurately pinpoint, capture and analyze the deadliest cells in the most common and aggressive brain cancer in adults.

New Website Predicts Likelihood Of Cyber Attacks Between Nations

The Cyber Attack Predictive Index (CAPI) provides a predictive analysis of nations most likely to engage in the surreptitious strategy waged with keyboards, code and destructive malware rather than soldiers, tanks and airplanes.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Hosts Virtual Fireside Chat with Anthony Fauci

A virtual fireside chat with Anthony Fauci will launch the Johns Hopkins University’s Health Policy Forum, a new quarterly series of discussions providing a platform for JHU students, faculty, staff, and alumni to engage in dialogues with Washington leaders around interdisciplinary health policy issues.

New Method Can Pinpoint Cracks In Metal Long Before They Cause Catastrophes

When metallic components in airplanes, bridges and other structures crack, the results are often catastrophic. But Johns Hopkins University researchers have found a way to reliably predict the vulnerabilities earlier than current tests. In a paper published today in Science, Johns Hopkins University researchers detail a new method for testing metals at a microscopic scale that allows them to rapidly inflict repetitive loads on materials while recording how ensuing damage evolves into cracks.

Poor Families Must Move Often, But Rarely Escape Concentrated Poverty

Unforeseen circumstances force low-income families to quickly move from one home to the next, a process that helps to perpetuate racial and economic segregation in the United States, research shows.

Vaccine Opposition Online Uniting Around ‘Civil Liberties’ Argument

Anti-vaccination discourse on Facebook increased in volume over the last decade, with opposition to vaccines coalescing around the argument that refusing to vaccinate is a civil right, according to a new study published today in the American Journal of Public Health.

Two Johns Hopkins Teams Finalists in Collegiate Inventors Competition

One team has invented a tool that could shave hours from a rhinoplasty. Another has created a sensor that ignores background noise – a device that could improve everything from telemedicine to Zoom calls.

These two Johns Hopkins University teams, a group of undergraduates and a group of graduates, are among the finalists announced today by the Collegiate Inventors Competition, an annual contest founded by the National Inventors Hall of Fame to encourage innovation and entrepreneurship at the collegiate level.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Hopkins Professor Available To Discuss California Power Outages, Electrical Grid Management and Renewable Energy

Benjamin Hobbs, a Johns Hopkins University professor of environmental health and engineering, is available to speak to the media about issues related to the California energy grid and a new effort to build more renewable energy into power markets over the next decade.