About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Beyond Tofurky: Can the Alt-Meat Trend Reach Thanksgiving?

Jan Dutkiewicz, a political scientist at Johns Hopkins and an expert in the alternative meat industry, can explain:
How the history of the Impossible Burger and other popular alternative meats can be traced to Thanksgiving.
Why despite the current plant-based meat craze, there is not yet a turkey option that’s created as much buzz.
How in the future Thanksgivings, with lab-grown meat soon to be available, people might be able to buy turkey created in a petri dish.

Sounds of Mosquito Mating Rituals Could Lead to Quieter Drones, Nontoxic Pest Control

Mosquitoes flap their wings not just to stay aloft but for two other critical purposes: to generate sound and to point that buzz in the direction of a potential mate, researchers at Johns Hopkins University have discovered. Their findings about the aerodynamics of mosquito wings could have implications for building quieter drones and for devising nontoxic methods to trap and exterminate the pests.

ADVISORY: JHU Experts Available on 30th Anniversary of Berlin Wall’s fall

Johns Hopkins University experts are available to offer perspective on the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Babies Understand Counting Years Earlier Than Believed

Babies who are years away from being able to say “one,” “two,” and “three” actually already have a sense of what counting means, Johns Hopkins University researchers have discovered.

The findings reveal that very early on, years earlier than previously believed, babies who hear counting realize that it’s about quantity.

ADVISORY: He Knows What Puts the YIKES Into the Scariest Stories

During this season when fear is in fashion, the only time of year when people look forward to feeling afraid, a Johns Hopkins University professor, an expert in zombies, vampires, horror literature and slasher films, is available to talk about what exactly puts the shiver into the world’s scariest stories.

Johns Hopkins Researchers Discover Superconducting Material That Could Someday Power Quantum Computer

Quantum computers with the ability to perform complex calculations, encrypt data more securely and more quickly predict the spread of viruses, may be within closer reach thanks to a new discovery by Johns Hopkins researchers.

Buttons and Flies Help Hopkins Solve Longtime DNA Mystery

Biologists at Johns Hopkins University have uncovered an important clue in the longtime mystery of how long strands of DNA fold up to squeeze into microscopic cells, with each pair of chromosomes aligned to ensure perfect development.

Positive Hiring Outlook for Data Analytics Jobs in Government

The market for data analytics jobs in federal, state and local government is expected to expand over the next two years as public agencies across the nation increasingly rely on data to improve operations, according to a new survey conducted by Johns Hopkins University and two partners, REI Systems and ACT-IAC.

Don’t Miss a Beat: Computer Simulations May Treat Most Common Heart Rhythm Disorder

Scientists at Johns Hopkins have successfully created personalized digital replicas of the upper chambers of the heart and used them to guide the precise treatment of patients suffering from persistent irregular heartbeats. These simulations accurately identified where clinicians need to destroy tissue to restore the heart’s normal rhythm.

Dark Matter May Be Older Than The Big Bang, Study Suggests

Dark matter, which researchers believe make up about 80% of the universe’s mass, is one of the most elusive mysteries in modern physics. What exactly it is and how it came to be is a mystery, but a new Johns Hopkins University study now suggests that dark matter may have existed before the Big Bang.

A Rocky Relationship: 2.5 Billion Years of Earth’s Continents Breaking Up and Getting Back Together

A new study of rocks that formed billions of years ago lends fresh insight into how Earth’s plate tectonics, or the movement of large pieces of Earth’s outer shell, evolved over the planet’s 4.56-billion-year history.

JHU: How Some Older Brains Decline Before People Realize It

Some older adults without noticeable cognitive problems have a harder time than younger people in separating irrelevant information from what they need to know at a given time, and a new Johns Hopkins University study could explain why.

Cancer Tissue-Freezing Approach May Help More Breast Cancer Patients in Lower Income Countries

A new reusable device created by the Johns Hopkins University can help women with breast cancer in lower income countries by using carbon dioxide, a widely available and affordable gas, to power a cancer tissue-freezing probe instead of industry-standard argon.

A Snapshot in Time: Study Captures Fleeting Cell Differences That Can Alter Disease Risk

In cinema and science fiction, one small change in the past can have major, sometimes life-changing effects in the future. Using a series of snapshots, researchers recently captured such so-called “butterfly effects” in heart muscle cell development, and say this new view into the sequence of gene expression activity may lead to better understanding disease risk.

Flamingoes, Elephants and Sharks: How Do Blind Adults Learn About Animal Appearance?

They’ve never seen animals like hippos and sharks but adults born blind have rich insight into what they look like, a new Johns Hopkins University study found.

Study: Treats Might Mask Animal Intelligence

Rewards are necessary for learning, but may actually mask true knowledge, finds a new Johns Hopkins University study with rodents and ferrets.

New Analysis Predicts Top 25 U.S. Counties at Risk for Measles Outbreaks

A new analysis co-led by The Johns Hopkins University identified 25 United States counties that are most likely to experience measles outbreaks in 2019. The analysis combined international air travel volume, non-medical exemptions from childhood vaccinations, population data and reported measles outbreak information.

Centers for Civic Impact Launches at Johns Hopkins

The Centers for Civic Impact, an effort to help public organizations thoughtfully and masterfully use data and research to better understand and improve public life, has launched at Johns Hopkins University.

Study: Millennials Arrested More Often Than Their Predecessors—Even When Fewer Crimes Are Committed

Millennials are more likely to be arrested than their predecessor counterparts regardless of self-reported criminal activity, finds a new study by a Johns Hopkins University expert. Furthermore, black men who self-reported no offenses were 419% more likely to be arrested at the beginning of the 21st century than non-offending blacks of the previous generation, and 31.5% more likely to be arrested than whites of the same generation who did not self-report any crimes.

New Hubble Measurements Confirm Universe Is Outpacing All Expectations of its Expansion Rate

April 25, 2019 CONTACT: Chanapa Tantibanchachai Office: 443-997-5056 / Cell: 928-458-9656 chanapa@jhu.edu @JHUmediareps New measurements from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope confirm that the Universe is expanding about 9% faster than expected based on its trajectory seen shortly after the big bang, astronomers say. The new measurements, accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal, reduce the chances […]

Media Advisory: JHU Students Build 17-Hole Miniature Golf Course

Freshmen mechanical engineering students at the Johns Hopkins University have built an interactive 17-hole miniature golf course for 2019 JHU Spring Fair guests to enjoy. Working in teams of three or four, the students have created 17 holes that make up a lively golf course—each hole has moving parts, sensors and lights. Come see the course for yourself and try your hand at a round or two.

Johns Hopkins Announces Major Solar Power Commitment

In the largest commitment to solar energy in Maryland and one of the most significant pledges to greenhouse gas reduction in higher education, Johns Hopkins University has entered into a long-term agreement to supply its campuses with more than 250,000 megawatt hours of solar power per year.

JHU’s Stavros Niarchos Foundation Agora Institute Announces Inaugural Director

A political scientist who dedicated her career to understanding civic and political participation will now work to advance them as inaugural director of the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Agora Institute at Johns Hopkins University. She starts July 1.

JHU Mind Games: Researchers Get Humans to Think Like Computers

Computers, like those that power self-driving cars, can be tricked into mistaking random scribbles for trains, fences and even school busses. People aren’t supposed to be able to see how those images trip up computers but in a new study, Johns Hopkins University researchers show most people actually can.

Johns Hopkins Grad Programs Rank Among Nation’s Best

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in public health, nursing and medicine are once again among the country’s very best, according to the annual U.S. News & World Report ranking of the nation’s “Best Graduate Schools.”