About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Individuals Physically Distanced Before State Mandates, Slowing COVID-19 Spread

Residents in all 25 of the U.S. counties hardest hit by COVID-19 began to limit their public movements six to 29 days before states implemented stay-at-home orders, according to Johns Hopkins University researchers.

Seminar Series Starting Friday Aims To Expose, Explain Threats to U.S. Democracy

A group of political science scholars is launching a webinar series on Friday to highlight escalating threats to democracy that have been percolating for decades and boiling over ever since Donald Trump’s election.

Juicy Genomics

When Pulitzer Prize and Grammy award winner Kendrick Lamar rapped “I got millions, I got riches buildin’ in my DNA,” he almost certainly wasn’t talking about the humble tomato. But a new study unveiling more than 230,000 DNA differences across 100 tomato varieties which will allow breeders and scientists to engineer larger, juicier, more profitable plants, proves that tomatoes indeed have riches buildin’ in their DNA, too.

Jitterbug: Roaches and Robots Shake It To Transition Between Movements In Tricky Terrain

By chasing cockroaches through an obstacle course and studying their movements, the Johns Hopkins engineers that brought you the cockroach robot and the snake robot discovered that animals’ movement transitions corresponded to overcoming potential energy barriers and that they can jitter around to traverse obstacles in complex terrain.

Johns Hopkins Aids National Effort To Build A Secure Smart Home

Smart homes of today – with lights, refrigerators and Alexa all talking to each other – aren’t nearly as smart as they need to be to thwart virtual burglars from breaking in. To address the massive security threat to interconnected devices known as the Internet of Things (IoT), Johns Hopkins University and six other institutions are embarking on an effort to fortify vulnerable points of entry against hackers.

Looking Up to the Stars Can Reveal What’s Deep Below

Using a new technique originally designed to explore the cosmos, scientists have unveiled structures deep inside the Earth, paving the way towards a new map revealing what Earth’s interior looks like.

Johns Hopkins Joins Project To Build New Tools To Model Pandemic Spread

The Johns Hopkins University professor behind the popular COVID-19 tracking map is joining scientists at two other institutions to develop new methods for understanding how and why the current coronavirus and future pandemics spread.

Researchers Run ‘Philosophy Experiment’ in a Lab to Test Objectivity of Vision

Johns Hopkins University researchers who study the mind and brain used methods from cognitive science to test a long-standing philosophical question: Can people see the world objectively?

ADVISORY: Expert Available on Altered Sense of Time During Pandemic

COVID-19 has affected people differently, yet many feel the pandemic has radically affected their sense of time. For some, time drags. For others it passes much too fast. And almost everyone is having trouble remembering what day it is. Ian Phillips, a Johns Hopkins University professor who studies how humans experience time, is available to discuss what’s causing this common but very disconcerting experience.

Johns Hopkins Releases Comprehensive Report on Digital Contact Tracing to Aid COVID-19 Response

Johns Hopkins University today released a comprehensive report to help government, technology developers, businesses, institutional leaders and the public make responsible decisions around use of digital contact tracing technology (DCTT), including smartphone apps and other tools, to fight COVID-19.

Johns Hopkins Researchers to Use Machine Learning to Predict Heart Damage in COVID-19 Victims

Johns Hopkins researchers recently received a $195,000 Rapid Response Research grant from the National Science Foundation to, using machine learning, identify which COVID-19 patients are at risk of adverse cardiac events such as heart failure, sustained abnormal heartbeats, heart attacks, cardiogenic shock and death.

JHU: What We Can’t See Can Help Us Find Things

Anyone who’s ever tried to find something in a hurry knows how helpful it is to think about the lost item’s color, size and shape. But surprisingly, traits of an object that you can’t see also come into play during a search, Johns Hopkins University researchers found.

Johns Hopkins Expands Research Into Eliminating Stockpiles of Weapons of Mass Destruction

The U.S. Department of Defense has selected Johns Hopkins University to lead an alliance of major research institutions to understand, predict, and control the behavior of materials in extreme conditions caused by weapons of mass destruction.

Researchers Find ‘Major Transformation’ In Global Climate Policy Ideas

The economic ideas that dominate global climate policy have undergone a “major transformation” over the past three decades from strictly market-based notions to recent diversified approaches featuring more government intervention, according to new research published in Nature Climate Change by a Johns Hopkins University political scientist.

ADVISORY: Expert Available to Discuss Minor League Baseball Realignment Plan

A computer scientist at Johns Hopkins University is available to discuss the study that he and his students have completed that analyzes Major League Baseball’s plan to realign Minor League Baseball by eliminating several small-town teams across the United States and re-shuffling remaining squads into new leagues.

Under Pressure: New Bioinspired Material Can ‘Shapeshift’ to External Forces

Inspired by how human bone and colorful coral reefs adjust mineral deposits in response to their surrounding environments, Johns Hopkins researchers have created a self-adapting material that can change its stiffness in response to the applied force. This advancement can someday open the doors for materials that can self-reinforce to prepare for increased force or stop further damage.

Lighting the Way to Safer Heart Procedures

In the first study of its kind, Johns Hopkins researchers provide evidence that an alternative imaging technique could someday replace current methods that require potentially harmful radiation.

Sulfur ‘Spices’ Alien Atmospheres

They say variety is the spice of life, and now new discoveries from Johns Hopkins researchers suggest that a certain elemental ‘variety’—sulfur—is indeed a ‘spice’ that can perhaps point to signs of life.

Johns Hopkins Taps Twitter to Measure Success of Social Distancing

By comparing Twitter data from before and after the COVID-19 outbreak, Johns Hopkins University researchers found a profound impact on the movement of Americans – indicating social distancing recommendations are having an effect.

Hopkins Gets FDA OK to Test Blood Therapies for COVID-19 Patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a clinical trial Friday that will allow Johns Hopkins University researchers to test a therapy for COVID-19 that uses plasma from recovering patients.

Johns Hopkins Engineers Developing 3D-printed Ventilator Splitter

In response to a pressing need for more ventilators to treat critically ill COVID-19 patients, a team led by Johns Hopkins University engineers is developing and prototyping a 3D-printed splitter that will allow a single ventilator to treat multiple patients. Though medical professionals have expressed concerns about the safety and effectiveness of sharing ventilators, the team has designed this tool to address those concerns.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Hosts Virtual Design Challenge to Address COVID-19

More than 2,000 people from 34 countries will compete in a five-day virtual design challenge to find innovative solutions to challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic. Teams will try to engineer solutions for problems ranging from how to protect front-line healthcare workers and their families to minimizing transmission of the virus to addressing shortages of critical healthcare and medical equipment to ensuring that people have accurate information to help them make informed decisions.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Expert Available to Discuss Use of Robots to Combat COVID-19

In a new Science Robotics editorial published today, experts discuss the potential use of robots to combat COVID-19 by decreasing risks posed to humans, safely resuming halted manufacturing and making teleoperations more efficient. Much of the work required in combatting COVID-19 requires “dull, dirty, and extremely dangerous tasks for human workers but suitable to robots,” the editorial authors say, and they point to potential uses such as disinfecting operating rooms, taking temperatures at ports of entry, delivering medications and more.

Russell (Russ) Taylor, Director of the Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics at The Johns Hopkins University, and an author on the editorial, is available to talk about the future of robotics and COVID-19.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins University Upgrades COVID-19 Tracking Map With Local U.S. Data

The Johns Hopkins University’s COVID-19 tracking map, which has become a vital worldwide resource, is launching an updated dashboard to report coronavirus cases for every city and county in the United States.

ADVISORY: Expert Available to Comment on Effects of Social Distancing and Quarantine Measures on Air Quality

A silver lining of social distancing and quarantine? Better air quality. As more and more cities across the U.S. clamp down on travel, there have been fewer cars on the road and early reports of improved air quality in cities like Los Angeles, Philadelphia and more. Peter DeCarlo, an associate professor in the Department of Environmental Health and Engineering at The Johns Hopkins University, can discuss how and to what extent social distancing and quarantine measures affect air pollution.