About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Undergraduate Team Named Finalist in Collegiate Inventors Competition

A team of Johns Hopkins University students are among the finalists in the Collegiate Inventors Competition for their invention of a device to reduce pain from nerve damage in people with amputations.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Grand Opening Set for Henderson-Hopkins School, Community Track and Field

Baltimore Mayor Brandon Scott and Johns Hopkins University President Ron Daniels will lace up their running shoes Monday for the grand opening of the Henderson-Hopkins school’s new track.

Vision for Baltimore Linked to Higher Test Scores for City Students

Baltimore students who received eyeglasses through the Vision for Baltimore program scored higher on reading and math tests, with students who struggle the most academically showing the greatest improvement, concludes a new study in JAMA Ophthalmology, conducted by Johns Hopkins researchers from the Wilmer Eye Institute and School of Education.

The study, released today, is the most robust to date in the United States on the impact of glasses on academic achievement and has implications beyond Baltimore for the millions of children nationwide who suffer from vision impairment but lack access to pediatric eye care.

Eyeglasses for School Kids Boosts Academic Performance

Students who received eyeglasses through a school-based program scored higher on reading and math tests, Johns Hopkins researchers from the Wilmer Eye Institute and School of Education found in the largest clinical study of the impact of glasses on education ever conducted in the United States. The students who struggled the most academically showed the greatest improvement.

Educated Women Increasingly Likely to Have 1st Baby Before Marriage

Sept. 7, 2021 CONTACT: Jill Rosen Cell: 443-547-8805 jrosen@jhu.edu jhunews@jhu.edu College-educated women are much more likely than ever before to have a first child outside of marriage, a new Johns Hopkins University study finds. Women with degrees are also more likely to be married at the time of their second birth, suggesting a historic shift […]

Hurricane Ida: Johns Hopkins Experts Can Discuss What Lies Ahead for Hard-Hit Areas

August 30, 2021 Kait Howard Cell: 443-301-7993 kehoward@jhu.edu jhunews@jhu.edu As Louisiana officials assess the destruction caused by Hurricane Ida, Johns Hopkins University experts can discuss anticipated damage, the effectiveness of the levee system, and next steps for search-and-rescue efforts and restoring power. Available experts include: Gonzalo Pita is an associate scientist and director of the […]

Hurricane Ida: Johns Hopkins Experts Can Discuss Threats Posed by the Storm

August 29, 2021 Kait Howard Cell: 443-301-7993 kehoward@jhu.edu jhunews@jhu.edu As the Gulf Coast braces for a potentially devastating Category 4 hurricane, Johns Hopkins University experts can discuss possible trajectories the storm can take, and what can be done to lessen the damage. Available experts include: A climate modeler, Anand Gnanadesikan looks at the atmospheric and […]

School Can be Scary in a Pandemic: Johns Hopkins Team Created App to Help Teachers Know How Kids are Feeling

Two Johns Hopkins University researchers who study classroom stress and the emotional well-being of students and teachers have released an app that allows teachers to get daily reports about how their students are feeling.

Though the tool wasn’t created for the pandemic, it certainly has come in handy over the last year as educators struggle to keep tabs on students, especially if they’re teaching remotely.

Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Team Details Lack of Daily Data on COVID-19

The Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center today published a new graphic visualization and analysis detailing the troubling trend of U.S. states eliminating daily reporting of COVID-19 data.

According to Coronavirus Resource Center experts, the reduction in daily reporting on cases, hospitalizations, deaths, and other vital data is taking place at a time when more public data is needed, not less — as the highly transmissible Delta variant is driving a new surge in the pandemic.

Blind People Can’t See Color but Understand It the Same Way as Sighted People

People born blind have never seen that bananas are yellow but Johns Hopkins University researchers find that like any sighted person, they understand two bananas are likely to be the same color and why. Questioning the belief that dates back to philosopher John Locke that people born blind could never truly understand color, the team of cognitive neuroscientists demonstrated that congenitally blind and sighted individuals actually understand it quite similarly.

Delta, Mask Mandates, Worried Parents: JHU Experts Can Discuss Back-to-School Concerns

Children nationwide are returning to school but not all regions are following CDC guidance on mask-wearing. Johns Hopkins University experts can offer perspective and context on the mixed messages parents, teachers and students are hearing, and what educators should be doing to prepare schools.

Johns Hopkins Expert Can Discuss Apple’s Plan to Monitor iPhones for Child Sexual Abuse

Apple has announced plans to scan iPhones and other Apple devices for images of child sexual abuse and report them to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. A Johns Hopkins University expert is available to discuss how the technology works, as well as potential privacy concerns.

New Tool Predicts Sudden Death in Inflammatory Heart Disease

Johns Hopkins University scientists have developed a new tool for predicting which patients suffering from a complex inflammatory heart disease are at risk of sudden cardiac arrest.

Handwriting Beats Typing and Watching Videos for Learning to Read

Though writing by hand is increasingly being eclipsed by the ease of computers, a new study finds we shouldn’t be so quick to throw away the pencils and paper: handwriting helps people learn certain skills surprisingly faster and significantly better than learning the same material through typing or watching videos.

Team Find Brain Mechanism That Automatically Links Objects in Our Minds

When people see a toothbrush, a car, a tree — any individual object — their brain automatically associates it with other things it naturally occurs with, allowing humans to build context for their surroundings and set expectations for the world.

By using machine-learning and brain imaging, researchers measured the extent of the “co-occurrence” phenomenon and identified the brain region involved. The findings appear in Nature Communications.

Motivation at an Empty Olympics? Johns Hopkins Expert Available On Mental Aspects of Top Athletic Performance

The Summer Olympics in Tokyo, which officially begin today, will be held without fans because of COVID-19. A Johns Hopkins University expert on the types of motivation that influence performance is available to discuss how that might affect outcomes at the games.

Vikram Chib, an associate professor in Johns Hopkins University’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, has studied the neural aspects behind performance, including what happens when people choke under pressure, and how having an audience can make you perform better.

Johns Hopkins Experts Available to Discuss U.S.-China Conflict Over Microsoft Email Hack

The Biden Administration and Western allies have formally accused the Chinese government of being behind a massive cyberattack on Microsoft email software and of working with cybercriminals on a range of other ransomware attacks and other cybercrimes.

Protein Appears to Prevent Tumor Cells from Spreading Via Blood Vessels

Researchers have identified a specialized protein that appears to help prevent tumor cells from entering the bloodstream and spreading to other parts of the body.

Johns Hopkins Expert Can Discuss Possible Cause of Florida Tower Collapse

In the wake of the devastating collapse of a Miami-area condominium tower, a Johns Hopkins University civil engineer can discuss the possibility that shifting soil beneath the building led to the massive structural failure.

The Most Curious Babies Years Later Maintain Cognitive Edge

A first-of-its-kind longitudinal study of infant curiosity found that months-old babies most captivated by magic tricks became the most curious toddlers, suggesting a pre-verbal baby’s level of interest in surprising aspects of the world remains constant over time and could predict their future cognitive ability.

Johns Hopkins Experts Available to Discuss Extreme Heat Wave Sweeping the U.S. West

As triple-digit temperatures scorch millions in California and the Desert West, stoking wildfires and exacerbating drought conditions, Johns Hopkins experts can discuss the environmental and health impacts of the heat wave, and how officials can better prepare for the rest of the summer.

Johns Hopkins Experts Available to Discuss New White House Cybersecurity Directive

The Biden Administration is urging corporate executives and business leaders to take immediate steps to counter ransomware attacks following major cybersecurity breaches in the U.S. oil and meat industries. Johns Hopkins University experts are available to offer perspective on the new guidelines.

Anne Applebaum Available to Discuss Arrest of Belarusian Journalist

As world leaders protest the Belarusian government’s brazen interception of a plane carrying a dissident journalist, Johns Hopkins University senior fellow Anne Applebaum can describe the political situation in Belarus, and how the incident fits into a pattern of increasing authoritarianism in countries across the globe.

Researchers Find Semimetal That Clings to a Quantum Precipice

In an open access paper published in Science Advances, Johns Hopkins physicists and colleagues at Rice University, the Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), present experimental evidence of naturally occurring quantum criticality in a material.

Johns Hopkins Experts Available to Discuss the Deepening Crisis in Gaza

As the death toll mounts in Gaza and the Israeli government resists calls for a ceasefire, Johns Hopkins University experts can offer perspective on why the fighting continues, and whether the United States can play a role in stopping it.