About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

JHU Mind Games: Researchers Get Humans to Think Like Computers

Computers, like those that power self-driving cars, can be tricked into mistaking random scribbles for trains, fences and even school busses. People aren’t supposed to be able to see how those images trip up computers but in a new study, Johns Hopkins University researchers show most people actually can.

Johns Hopkins Grad Programs Rank Among Nation’s Best

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in public health, nursing and medicine are once again among the country’s very best, according to the annual U.S. News & World Report ranking of the nation’s “Best Graduate Schools.”

Media Advisory: Cyber Security Conference at Johns Hopkins University Features Experts from Academia and Industry

The 5th Annual Cyber Security Conference for Executives, co-sponsored by Johns Hopkins University and business advisory and expert services firm Ankura, presents a forum for experts from academia, private business, and government to share their knowledge and experience.

Singing for Science: How the Arts Can Help Students Who Struggle Most

Incorporating the arts—rapping, dancing, drawing—into science lessons can help low-achieving students retain more knowledge and possibly help students of all ability levels be more creative in their learning, finds a new study by Johns Hopkins University.

Breaking Up is Hard to Do: Asteroids are Stronger, Harder to Destroy Than Previously Thought

A popular theme in the movies is that of an incoming asteroid that could extinguish life on the planet, and our heroes are launched into space to blow it up. But incoming asteroids may be harder to break than scientists previously thought, finds a Johns Hopkins study that used a new understanding of rock fracture and a new computer modeling method to simulate asteroid collisions.

Shedding Light—Literally—on Resistance to Radiation Therapy

A new Johns Hopkins study offers promise towards someday being able to non-invasively examine changes in cancerous tumors to determine whether they’ll respond to radiation treatment, before treatment even begins.

More Flexible Nanomaterials Can Make Fuel Cell Cars Cheaper

A new method of increasing the reactivity of ultrathin nanosheets, just a few atoms thick, can someday make fuel cells for hydrogen cars cheaper, finds a new Johns Hopkins study.

Astrophysicist Brice Ménard receives President’s Frontier Award

Many astronomy researchers benefit from sky surveys containing millions of stars and galaxies observed by telescopes. But Brice Ménard’s colleagues say his imagination and insight make him particularly adept at discovering the universal secrets hidden in a daunting amount of data. Ménard, an astrophysicist and associate professor at Johns Hopkins University, has received this year’s $250,000 President’s Frontier Award to support his exploration of astronomical data.

Dangerous School Commutes Lead to Student Absenteeism

The more crime that occurs along a student’s way to school, the higher the likelihood that student will be absent, Johns Hopkins University researchers found.

Rats in Augmented Reality Help Show How the Brain Determines Location

February 11, 2019 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Chanapa Tantibanchachai Office: 443-997-5056 / Cell: 928-458-9656 chanapa@jhu.edu @JHUmediareps Before the age of GPS, humans had to orient themselves without on-screen arrows pointing down an exact street, but rather, by memorizing landmarks and using learned relationships among time, speed and distance. They had to know, for instance, that […]

Media Advisory: Hundreds of College Students to Gather at Johns Hopkins for Weekend Hackathon

February 11, 2019 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Shani McPherson Office: 410-516-4778 Cell: 510-393-7159 sprovos1@jhu.edu WHAT: More than 300 graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University this weekend for the latest HopHacks, a marathon session challenging students to realize their best software and hardware ideas and compete for cash […]

JHU Scientists Find New Science Instrument on Mars Curiosity Rover

The Curiosity Rover may have been ambling around the Gale Crater on Mars for nearly seven years but a group at Johns Hopkins University has just found a way to use it for something new: making the first surface gravity measurements on a planet other than Earth.

China’s Regulations Unsuccessful in Curbing Methane Emissions

China, already the world’s leading emitter of human-caused greenhouse gases, continues to pump increasing amounts of climate-changing methane into the atmosphere despite tough new regulations on gas releases from its coal mines, a new Johns Hopkins study shows.

MEDIA ADVISORY: JHU Expert Available on Implications of 3-Parent Baby

A 32-year-old Greek woman is reportedly pregnant from an experimental reproductive technique that uses DNA from three people, the result of the first known clinical trial to use the controversial procedure to treat infertility. 

Jeffrey Kahn, director of Johns Hopkins University’s Berman Institute of Bioethics, who chaired a 2016 U.S. National Academy of Sciences panel that examined the science and ethical issues raised by the three-parent procedure, is available to discuss the implications of this new pregnancy and the procedure, known as mitochondrial replacement therapy, which is banned in the United States.

Divided Nation, United States: Navigating Today’s Partisan Waters

The Johns Hopkins University Stavros Niarchos Foundation Agora Institute will sponsor a PBS NewsHour event Divided Nation, United States, to try to uncover how these governors work with their legislatures, relate to their constituents, and define success.

Demi Lovato’s Overdose Causes Surge in Media, but Few Mentions of Lifesaving Hotline

Demi Lovato’s drug overdose and Anthony Bourdain’s suicide resulted in unequal news coverage of national help hotlines, finds a new study published Jan. 14 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

MEDIA ADVISORY: 300 Baltimore City Public Schools Students to Compete in Robotics Contest at JHU

More than 300 elementary, middle, and high school Baltimore City Public Schools students will compete Saturday in the Hopkins Robotics Cup, the Baltimore City VEX and VEX IQ Robotics League championship event.

How the Brain Decides Whether to Hold ’Em or Fold ’Em

Johns Hopkins study sheds light on brain basis of risk-taking behavior January 7, 2019 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Chanapa Tantibanchachai Office: 443-997-9009/ Cell: 928-458-9656 chanapa@jhu.edu @JHUmediareps Picture yourself at a Las Vegas poker table, holding a bad hand – one with a very low chance of winning. Even so, the sight of the large stack […]

JHU to Host Science Internships for Minorities, Students Lacking Access to Advanced Research

The Johns Hopkins University has been awarded more than $600,000 to offer summer research experiences for undergraduates from backgrounds underrepresented in science and whose own colleges and universities offer limited chances to work on original research.

What Looks Like Substance Abuse Could be Self-Medication, Study Finds

When improved antidepressants hit the market in the 1980s, heavy drinking among people with depression dropped 22 percent, suggesting people who knowingly use drugs and alcohol to relieve mental and physical pain will switch to safer, better treatment options when they can get them, a new Johns Hopkins University study found.

Alien Imposters: Planets with Oxygen Don’t Necessarily Have Life

In their search for life in solar systems near and far, researchers have often accepted the presence of oxygen in a planet’s atmosphere as the surest sign that life may be present there. A new Johns Hopkins study, however, recommends a reconsideration of that rule of thumb.

Hubble Finds Far-Away Planet Vanishing at Record Speed

The speed and distance at which planets orbit their respective blazing stars can determine each planet’s fate—whether the planet remains a longstanding part of its solar system or evaporates into the universe’s dark graveyard more quickly.

In their quest to learn more about far-away planets beyond our own solar system, astronomers discovered that a medium-sized planet roughly the size of Neptune, GJ 3470b, is evaporating at a rate 100 times faster than a previously discovered planet of similar size, GJ 436b.

Advisory: JHU Expert Available on Lab-Grown Meat

Aleph Farms of Israel announced today unveiled the world’s first lab-grown steak, a steak grown in a petri dish that has the taste and texture of one that comes from a real cow. Other companies are also racing to perfect various versions of lab-grown meat. Jan Dutkiewicz, a postdoctoral fellow in political science at Johns Hopkins University who has researched the emergence of cellular agriculture, or “lab-grown meat,” and its potential to transform the American food landscape, is available to talk about the new steak and offer perspective on the development.

JHU Survey: Americans Don’t Know Much About State Government

Americans trust their state governments to handle issues as important as education and health care and pay them more than a trillion dollars in taxes annually, yet we know very little about these institutions, a new Johns Hopkins University survey finds.

Advisory: Mikulski Statement on the Death of George H.W. Bush

Retired U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, D-Md., a Homewood Professor at Johns Hopkins University, today issued the following statement on the passing of former President George H.W. Bush.