About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Expert Available to Discuss Gas Shortage Panic Buying

As a worsening gas shortage across much of the Eastern United States causes a surge in panic buying, a Johns Hopkins University economist who has researched stockpiling mentality, can discuss the consumer behavior in play.

Johns Hopkins Economist Available to Discuss Rising Consumer Costs

With consumer prices in the United States climbing to levels not seen since the recession, a Johns Hopkins University economist is available to offer perspective on possible causes and whether or not this signals inflation, or pandemic recovery.

Johns Hopkins Experts Available to Discuss CDC, FDA Suspension of Johnson & Johnson Vaccine

Federal health agencies have asked for a temporary distribution suspension of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine after instances of blood clots linked to the shots. The decision is expected to halt or limit U.S. rollout of the vaccine, and Johns Hopkins University experts can offer perspective and commentary on the news.

Johns Hopkins Expert Available to Discuss Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Factory Error

A Johns Hopkins University health care expert is available to offer perspective on the news that a mistake at a Johnson & Johnson factory producing the COVID-19 vaccine resulted in the loss of millions of doses.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Experts Available on Anniversary of WFH, SchoolFH

The United States is approaching the one-year anniversary of the pandemic forcing the closure of offices and schools across the country, launching millions of Americans into remote work and schooling.

Johns Hopkins University experts who have been studying the short and long-term impacts of these changes are available to speak about the possible implications of WFH and SchoolFH on the future of work and education.

Johns Hopkins Study Details How Faster Train Service Would Boost Baltimore Economy

Faster commuter trains between Baltimore and Washington, D.C. could have a profound economic impact on Maryland’s largest city by attracting an influx of District residents that could spur more neighborhood redevelopment and by giving Charm City residents easier access to higher paying jobs in the nation’s capital.

New Johns Hopkins Report Details Plan for Digital Equity in Baltimore

The lack of reliable access to broadband internet service for many in Baltimore, particularly the poor, has profound economic and social consequences. The COVID-19 pandemic has made this painfully clear with an abrupt shift to online learning, remote work, and telemedicine. A new analysis from Johns Hopkins University’s 21st Century Cities Initiative says the city could move towards digital equity, with a roadmap of recommendations built on existing knowledge of Baltimore’s digital assets and the experience of other cities.

The Richer You are, The More Likely You’ll Social Distance, Study Finds

The higher a person’s income, the more likely they were to protect themselves at the early stages of the Covid-19 pandemic in the United States, Johns Hopkins University economists find.

When it comes to adopting behaviors including social distancing and mask wearing, the team detected a striking link to their financial well-being. People who made around $230,000 a year were as much as 54% more likely to increase these types of self-protective behaviors compared to people making about $13,000.

More Pavement, More Problems

Think your daily coffee, boutique gym membership and airport lounge access cost a lot? There may be an additional, hidden cost to those luxuries of urban living, says a new Johns Hopkins University study: more flooding.

For every percentage point increase in roads, parking lots and other impervious surfaces that prevent water from flowing into the ground, annual floods increase on average by 3.3%, the researchers found.

ADVISORY: JHU Profs Would End Leap Year with New ‘Permanent’ Calendar

This year, 2020, is leap year. And if two Johns Hopkins University professors had their way it would be the last. An economist and an astrophysicist have designed a new, simpler calendar, where the days would align in precisely the same way every year and a person could buy one calendar and use it forever. Every year would begin on Monday, Jan. 1. And of course leap year would be extinct, as would the occasional extra day for February.

Beyond Tofurky: Can the Alt-Meat Trend Reach Thanksgiving?

Jan Dutkiewicz, a political scientist at Johns Hopkins and an expert in the alternative meat industry, can explain:
How the history of the Impossible Burger and other popular alternative meats can be traced to Thanksgiving.
Why despite the current plant-based meat craze, there is not yet a turkey option that’s created as much buzz.
How in the future Thanksgivings, with lab-grown meat soon to be available, people might be able to buy turkey created in a petri dish.

What Looks Like Substance Abuse Could be Self-Medication, Study Finds

When improved antidepressants hit the market in the 1980s, heavy drinking among people with depression dropped 22 percent, suggesting people who knowingly use drugs and alcohol to relieve mental and physical pain will switch to safer, better treatment options when they can get them, a new Johns Hopkins University study found.

Advisory: JHU Expert Available on Lab-Grown Meat

Aleph Farms of Israel announced today unveiled the world’s first lab-grown steak, a steak grown in a petri dish that has the taste and texture of one that comes from a real cow. Other companies are also racing to perfect various versions of lab-grown meat. Jan Dutkiewicz, a postdoctoral fellow in political science at Johns Hopkins University who has researched the emergence of cellular agriculture, or “lab-grown meat,” and its potential to transform the American food landscape, is available to talk about the new steak and offer perspective on the development.

Black Students Who Have One Black Teacher More Likely to Go to College

Having one black teacher in elementary school not only makes children more likely to graduate high school, it makes them significantly more likely to enroll in college.

High Water Bills Can Unintentionally Harm Disadvantaged Tenants

Landlords in disadvantaged communities are so unsettled by increasing water bills and nuisance fees they are taking it out their tenants, threatening the housing security of those who need it most, a new Johns Hopkins University study concludes.

Baltimore Students to Take ‘Wakanda Challenge’ at Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Event

At the annual meeting of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, the nation’s largest gathering of black elected officials, about 100 students from Baltimore City’s Dunbar High School will participate in an event called the STEAM Revolt Youth Workshop: Wakanda Design Challenge. In this interactive contest, students, who are part of Dunbar’s P-TECH college prep program, will create a new Avengers superhero with ties to African culture.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available

Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available.

JHU Project Aims to Save Millions by Reducing Solar Power Forecast Errors

Although the popularity of solar energy has surged, the unpredictability of a weather-dependent technology has kept even more people from embracing it. A new Johns Hopkins University-led project hopes to change that by improving our ability to forecast sunshine and backup power needs.

How Recent Economy Kept Black, White Young Adults From Leaving Nest

The economically tumultuous last decade convinced many young people to keep living with their parents, but the reasons why differ starkly by race, concludes a new Johns Hopkins University-led study.

Johns Hopkins Teams with Lockheed Martin to Enhance STEM Programming for PreK-12th Grade Students

The Johns Hopkins University and Lockheed Martin today announced a partnership aimed at enhancing opportunities for Baltimore City public school students pursuing academic and career fields in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). The collaboration is designed to close the STEM gap that exists primarily in Pre-K through 12th grade.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Conference to Explore Race, Segregation and Inequality

Race & Inequality in America: The Kerner Commission at 50. A conference featuring dozens of scholars and experts exploring race, segregation, and inequality 50 years after the release of the historic Kerner Commission Report.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Leaders to Address Issues Facing Cities

Leaders representing about 45 U.S. cities and urban scholars will convene to discuss new research on critical issues for metro areas during the 21st Century Neighborhoods: Research. Leadership. Transformation symposium, sponsored by Johns Hopkins University’s 21st Century Cities Initiative.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Experts Can Discuss Fed Chair Options

Janet Yellen’s term as chair of the Federal Reserve is slated to end in February 2018. Speculation is underway about who President Donald Trump might choose to be her successor in the highly influential role leading the central bank of the United States.

Johns Hopkins University has several experts available, all with extensive media commentating experience, to discuss this and any news related to The Fed.

MEDIA ADVISORY: City Leaders to Discuss How to Finance Baltimore’s Growth

Public, private, academic, and nonprofit leaders from Baltimore and elsewhere in Maryland will gather to discuss strategies for strengthening Baltimore’s financing system for small companies, following a new report from Johns Hopkins University’s 21st Century Cities Initiative.

Follow the Money: How Does Baltimore Support Small Business Growth?

Baltimore, a city with clear economic assets and competitive advantages, should have a more robust financing system to cultivate a range of startups and small businesses, concludes a new report by Johns Hopkins University’s 21st Century Cities Initiative.