About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

MEDIA ADVISORY: Experts Can Discuss Fed Chair Options

Janet Yellen’s term as chair of the Federal Reserve is slated to end in February 2018. Speculation is underway about who President Donald Trump might choose to be her successor in the highly influential role leading the central bank of the United States.

Johns Hopkins University has several experts available, all with extensive media commentating experience, to discuss this and any news related to The Fed.

MEDIA ADVISORY: City Leaders to Discuss How to Finance Baltimore’s Growth

Public, private, academic, and nonprofit leaders from Baltimore and elsewhere in Maryland will gather to discuss strategies for strengthening Baltimore’s financing system for small companies, following a new report from Johns Hopkins University’s 21st Century Cities Initiative.

Follow the Money: How Does Baltimore Support Small Business Growth?

Baltimore, a city with clear economic assets and competitive advantages, should have a more robust financing system to cultivate a range of startups and small businesses, concludes a new report by Johns Hopkins University’s 21st Century Cities Initiative.

MEDIA ADVISORY: More Hurricane Harvey Experts from Johns Hopkins University

This is a third list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on issues associated with the onslaught and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

MEDIA ADVISORY: More Hurricane Harvey Experts from Johns Hopkins University

This is a second list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on issues associated with the onslaught and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Hurricane Experts from Johns Hopkins University

A list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on various issues associated with the formation, onslaught and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. This list will be updated as warranted.

Study: Black and White Kids Faring Equally in Subsidized Housing

Once-formidable disparities between black and white families living in subsidized housing have largely vanished, and black and white children who grew up in such housing fared similarly in school, jobs and earnings, finds a new Johns Hopkins University study. However, one troubling difference remains between black and white families in assisted housing — neighborhood quality. Black families getting subsidized housing are about nine time more likely than whites to live in segregated, impoverished neighborhoods, the study found.

With Just One Black Teacher, Black Students More Likely to Graduate

Low-income black students who have at least one black teacher in elementary school are significantly more likely to graduate high school and consider attending college, concludes a new study co-authored by a Johns Hopkins University economist.

When Women’s Health Improves, Domestic Violence Diminishes

Chronically ill, low-income women who thought they were dying, experienced a sharp reduction in domestic violence after getting access to a life-saving treatment, a Johns Hopkins University-led study found.

Teens in Poorest Families Go Hungry More Than Younger Kids

In very poor families, teenagers are going hungry twice as often as their younger siblings, a new Johns Hopkins University study finds.

Subsidized Housing Works Better for Some Kids Than Others

Living in subsidized housing seems to give a boost to children with high standardized test scores and few behavior problems, but it has the opposite effect on students who score poorly and have behavioral issues, a new study finds.

For-Profit Trade Schools Prove Costly for Disadvantaged Black Youth

Young African-Americans from some of the country’s most disadvantaged neighborhoods are drawn to for-profit post-secondary trade schools, believing they are the quickest route to jobs. But a new study co-authored by a Johns Hopkins University sociologist finds the very thing that makes for-profit schools seem so appealing — a streamlined curriculum — is the reason so many poor students drop out.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Experts Available to Discuss Election Topics

The following Johns Hopkins University experts, whose research focuses on such subjects as race, economic policy, inequality, gun violence, law enforcement and health care, are available for interviews during the presidential election season.

Sunil Kumar Named Johns Hopkins Provost

Sunil Kumar, dean of the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and a widely published expert on operations management and research, has been appointed the 15th provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at the Johns Hopkins University.

Johns Hopkins Launches New Online Master’s Degree in Financial Mathematics

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals, the division of Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering that administers online and part-time graduate programs, has launched a new financial mathematics master’s degree program that can be completed online.

Tax Prep Chains Target Low-Income Workers

National tax preparation chains continue to exploit the working poor, many of whom spend a significant portion of a key federal anti-poverty tax credit just to pay for filing their taxes, a new study concludes.

Why Some People Would Pay for a Drug They Probably Won’t Ever Need

A sick person is obviously willing to pay for a good medical treatment, but a Johns Hopkins University economist and his collaborators finds healthy people are potentially a much broader, if largely overlooked, market for medical innovations.

If You Made Money Buying a 1st Home in the 2000s, You Probably Weren’t Black

In a study recently published in the journal Real Estate Economics, public policy professor Sandra J. Newman and researcher C. Scott Holupka found that race was a key determinate of which low and moderate-income people who bought first homes during the decade made money. During the Great Recession, white homebuyers lost money but black ones lost considerably more. Even during the boom years, when white buyers increased their wealth by 50 percent, black buyers lost 47 percent of their wealth.

Johns Hopkins and DuPont Join Forces to Produce an Improved Ebola Protection Suit

The Johns Hopkins University and DuPont have signed license and collaboration agreements allowing DuPont to commercialize a garment with innovative features from Johns Hopkins to help protect people on the front lines of the Ebola crisis and future deadly infectious disease outbreaks. DuPont intends to have the first of these garments available in the marketplace during the first half of 2016.

Johns Hopkins Joins National Sustainable Nanotechnology Project

Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University have joined a national effort to produce environmentally friendly materials built at the atomic and molecular scale.The environmental impact of materials used in emerging areas of nanotechnology – used, for instance, in video screens, solar cells and electric car batteries – is largely unknown, but scientists working across the country under a new federal grant hope to learn how these products affect the natural world before their commercial use expands.

Advisory: Johns Hopkins Business Experts Available to Discuss Hurricane Katrina

To assist journalists covering the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School experts are available to comment on issues related to risk management, preparedness, community development, infrastructure, health, finance and related issues.

Cyber Security Experts to Discuss Tricky Balance Between Data Sharing and Privacy

In its efforts to curb criminal activity, should the government be allowed to see confidential consumer data collected by businesses? Or does the right to privacy trump such intrusions? These complex questions will be the focus of the second annual Senior Executive Cyber Security Conference, to be held Thursday, Sept. 10, at Johns Hopkins University. Registration for the daylong event is under way.

Love and Money: How Low-Income Dads Really Provide

Low-income fathers who might be labeled “deadbeat dads” often spend as much on their children as parents in formal child support arrangements, but they choose to give goods like food and clothing rather than cash, a Johns Hopkins-led study found.

Critics of American Tax Scofflaws ‘Hypocritical’

Although critics knock United States-based companies like Apple, Google and Starbucks for dodging taxes overseas, a new analysis shows that European companies in the states are enjoying the same sort of tax breaks.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Teams of Student Entrepreneurs to Face Judges for $81,000 in Johns Hopkins Business Plan Funding on Friday, May 1

The nationally recognized Johns Hopkins University Business Plan Competition, hosted on Friday, May 1, by the Center for Leadership Education, will feature student teams from various divisions of Johns Hopkins University, as well as students representing The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Yale School of Management, and Tulane University. The teams will compete in one of four categories, for a portion of $81,000 in funding to be announced at a dinner that night.