About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

JHU Project Aims to Save Millions by Reducing Solar Power Forecast Errors

Although the popularity of solar energy has surged, the unpredictability of a weather-dependent technology has kept even more people from embracing it. A new Johns Hopkins University-led project hopes to change that by improving our ability to forecast sunshine and backup power needs.

Johns Hopkins-Taiwan Team Up in Cross-Cultural Doctoral Program

A new partnership between the Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering and Taiwan’s Ministry of Education will bring students from that country to Johns Hopkins’ Homewood campus to pursue doctoral studies in engineering beginning in August 2019.

New ‘E-Dermis’ Brings Sense of Touch, Pain to Prosthetic Hands

Engineers have created an electronic skin, aiming to restore a real sense of touch for amputees using prosthetic hands.

Science and Health News Tips from Johns Hopkins

News tips for reporters from stories in the spring 2018 issue of Johns Hopkins Magazine.

New Computational Strategy Designed for More Personalized Cancer Treatment

Mathematicians and cancer scientists have found a way to simplify complex biomolecular data about tumors, in principle making it easier to prescribe the appropriate treatment for a specific patient.

City Elementary/Middle Students to Show Off Their STEM Inventions

Students from nine Baltimore City elementary/middle schools will show off creations they conceived and built—some as part of classroom assignments, and others in response to challenges they encounter in their own communities.

Flaw Found in Water Treatment Methods

Some potentially toxic chemicals in water may be created, ironically, during the water treatment process itself.

Souped-up Walker to Help Get Pediatric ICU Patients on Their Feet

An undergraduate student design team is developing a walker designed to help get pediatric ICU patients up and moving as quickly as possible.

JHU and Lockheed Martin to Host Science and Engineering Expo at Baltimore City School

The Johns Hopkins University, Lockheed Martin and Barclay Elementary/Middle School will come together for an evening designed to showcase the science and engineering projects that students have been working on in the classroom all year.

Students Devise One-Size-Fits-All Blood-Clotting Tool

Engineering undergraduates have developed an anti-bleeding “super gel” that can be delivered with a catheter but is hyper-absorbent enough to then swell with blood, creating a clot to block any bleeding.

Johns Hopkins Teams with Lockheed Martin to Enhance STEM Programming for PreK-12th Grade Students

The Johns Hopkins University and Lockheed Martin today announced a partnership aimed at enhancing opportunities for Baltimore City public school students pursuing academic and career fields in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). The collaboration is designed to close the STEM gap that exists primarily in Pre-K through 12th grade.

Art Meets Science at New Johns Hopkins Exhibit

The latest exhibit in a program that brings together artists and scientists opens at Johns Hopkins University.

JHU Records Brain Activity of a Free-flying Bat

Johns Hopkins University researchers have developed a way to study the brain of a bat as it flies, recording for the first time what happens as an animal focuses its attention.

Smartphone ‘Scores’ Can Help Doctors Track Severity of Parkinson’s Disease Symptoms

Parkinson’s disease, a progressive brain disorder, is often tough to treat effectively because symptoms, such as tremors and walking difficulties, can vary dramatically over a period of days, or even hours. To address this challenge, Johns Hopkins University computer scientists, working with an interdisciplinary team of experts from two other institutions, have developed a new approach that uses sensors on a smartphone to generate a score that reliably reflects symptom severity in patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Diverse Metals Mix it Up in Novel Nanoparticles

Johns Hopkins researchers have teamed with colleagues from three other universities to combine up to eight different metals into single, uniformly mixed nanoparticles.

Local Girl Scouts to Build Mini Roller Coasters During Contest at Johns Hopkins

Maryland Girl Scouts will learn about the physics involved in how roller coasters work and what it takes to be an engineer. Then, the scout troops will design and build their own mini roller coasters.

Johns Hopkins Grad Programs Rank Among Nation’s Best

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in biomedical engineering, nursing and medicine are once again among the country’s very best, according to the annual U.S. News & World Report ranking of the nation’s “Best Graduate Schools.”

Science and Health News Tips from Johns Hopkins

These news tips come from stories in the winter issue of Johns Hopkins Magazine.

Hacker-Resistant Power Plant Software Gets a Glowing Tryout in Hawaii

Johns Hopkins computer security experts recently traveled to Hawaii to see how well their hacker-resistant software would operate within a working but currently offline Honolulu power plant. The successful resilience testing, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, was triggered in part by growing concerns about the vulnerability of electric power grids after two high-profile cyber-attacks turned out the lights in parts of Ukraine during the past two years.

Hundreds of College Students to Convene at JHU for Marathon Weekend Hackathon

Graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University this weekend for the latest HopHacks, a marathon session. The event challenges students to realize their best software and hardware ideas and compete for cash and other sponsored prizes.

Can a Cockroach Teach a Robot How to Scurry Across Rugged Terrain?

When they turn up in family pantries or restaurant kitchens, cockroaches are commonly despised as ugly, unhealthy pests and are quickly killed. But in the name of science, Johns Hopkins researchers have put these unwanted bugs to work.

JHU Researchers Elected Into National Academy of Engineering

Two Johns Hopkins University researchers were awarded one of the highest professional distinctions for engineers: election into the National Academy of Engineering.

Mind of a Medalist: Scientists Explain How the Brain Can Lead to Olympic Gold

Any athlete who’s made it to the Olympics has speed or strength or whatever physical skills it takes to lead the world in their sport. But Johns Hopkins University scientists say those who ultimately bring home gold have also honed the mind of a medalist.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Super Bowl Marks the Season’s End, But Concussion Concerns Continue

During this year’s Super Bowl, K.T. Ramesh, a biomechanics expert at Johns Hopkins University, will pay more attention to the collateral damage that can occur during football games: head injuries. He is developing a technological tool to help better diagnose concussions and predict where related brain damage has likely occurred.

Media Advisory: 55 Baltimore City School Teams to Compete in Robotics Contest at Johns Hopkins

On Saturday, Jan. 7, 2018, more than 200 elementary, middle and high school students from Baltimore City Public Schools will compete in the Hopkins Robotics Cup, the Baltimore City VEX and VEX IQ Robotics League’s championship event at Johns Hopkins Homewood Campus..