About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

John Kasich to Speak at Johns Hopkins

Ohio Gov. John Kasich, the last Republican candidate in the race for his party’s nomination against Donald Trump, will speak at Johns Hopkins University.

Environmentalist Winona LaDuke to Speak at Johns Hopkins

The next event in the JHU Forums on Race in America will feature environmentalist Winona LaDuke.

Climate Change Likely to be More Deadly in Poor African Settlements

Conditions in crowded, urban settlements in Africa make worse the effects of climate change, pushing temperatures to dangerous heights for children and the elderly in those areas, according to a new study led by a Johns Hopkins University scientist.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Win Grant for Machine Language Translation

A team of computer scientists at Johns Hopkins University has won a $10.7 million grant from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence to create an information retrieval and translation system for languages that are not widely used around the world.

MEDIA ADVISORY: How the U.S. Can Sway North Korea

Johns Hopkins University political scientist Steven David, has a theory about how the United States might be able to influence the leadership of North Korea. He is available for media interviews.

Advisory: JHU Experts Can Discuss Race, Political movements, Inequality

The following Johns Hopkins University experts — political scientists, economists, historians and sociologists — are available for interviews on topics of race, inequality and political movements:

Johns Hopkins Launches Effort to Improve Civic Engagement

The Stavros Niarchos Foundation has committed $150 million to Johns Hopkins University to forge new ways to address the deterioration of civic engagement worldwide.

Study: Black and White Kids Faring Equally in Subsidized Housing

Once-formidable disparities between black and white families living in subsidized housing have largely vanished, and black and white children who grew up in such housing fared similarly in school, jobs and earnings, finds a new Johns Hopkins University study. However, one troubling difference remains between black and white families in assisted housing — neighborhood quality. Black families getting subsidized housing are about nine time more likely than whites to live in segregated, impoverished neighborhoods, the study found.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Theory for Trump’s Frenetic First Days

Johns Hopkins University political scientist Benjamin Ginsberg offers a possible explanation of the motives behind the flurry of executive orders and presidential memoranda issued during President Donald Trump’s first week in office.

Retired Sen. Barbara Mikulski to Join University Faculty

Barbara A. Mikulski, the longest-serving woman in the history of Congress and Maryland’s longest-tenured U.S. senator, will join the Johns Hopkins University on Jan. 16 as a professor of public policy and presidential adviser.

When Washington Doesn’t Get America

Washington doesn’t think very highly of the American people, concludes a yearlong Johns Hopkins University study of 850 non-elected officials working in the nation’s capital.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Experts Available to Discuss Election Topics

The following Johns Hopkins University experts, whose research focuses on such subjects as race, economic policy, inequality, gun violence, law enforcement and health care, are available for interviews during the presidential election season.

Tax Prep Chains Target Low-Income Workers

National tax preparation chains continue to exploit the working poor, many of whom spend a significant portion of a key federal anti-poverty tax credit just to pay for filing their taxes, a new study concludes.

How Do Energy Policies and Climate Change Affect Air Quality—and Our Health?

A new interdisciplinary science team, led by experts from Yale and Johns Hopkins universities and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, will try to figure how power generation trends, climate change and public policy interact to affect air quality. A key goal is to trace how the resulting changes in air pollution may affect the health of people who live and work in the mid-Atlantic area.

Department of Labor Official Joins 21st Century Cities Initiative

Ben Seigel, a Baltimore native who helped design the Obama Administration’s place-based strategy and led the federal government’s effort to address deep-rooted issues in Baltimore after last year’s unrest, has joined a Johns Hopkins University project to strengthen cities with similar urban challenges.

FEMA Data Official Joins Center for Government Excellence

Carter Hewgley, former head of analytics for the Federal Emergency Management Agency, has joined a Johns Hopkins University project to make cities’ data more accessible and help solve urban problems.

Cyber Security Experts to Discuss Tricky Balance Between Data Sharing and Privacy

In its efforts to curb criminal activity, should the government be allowed to see confidential consumer data collected by businesses? Or does the right to privacy trump such intrusions? These complex questions will be the focus of the second annual Senior Executive Cyber Security Conference, to be held Thursday, Sept. 10, at Johns Hopkins University. Registration for the daylong event is under way.

Love and Money: How Low-Income Dads Really Provide

Low-income fathers who might be labeled “deadbeat dads” often spend as much on their children as parents in formal child support arrangements, but they choose to give goods like food and clothing rather than cash, a Johns Hopkins-led study found.

New York Open-Data Program Chief Joins Center for Government Excellence

Andrew Nicklin, former head of groundbreaking open-data programs in New York city and state, has joined a Johns Hopkins University project to make cities’ data more accessible and help solve urban problems.

$10 Million Aronson Gift Creates International Studies Center

The chair of the Johns Hopkins University’s board of trustees and his wife have committed $10 million to give students new opportunities in international relations and to enhance scholarly work on major world issues.

Who’s Making Sure the Power Stays On?

Electricity systems in the United States are so haphazardly regulated for reliability, it’s nearly impossible for customers to know their true risk of losing service in a major storm, a Johns Hopkins University analysis found.

Critics of American Tax Scofflaws ‘Hypocritical’

Although critics knock United States-based companies like Apple, Google and Starbucks for dodging taxes overseas, a new analysis shows that European companies in the states are enjoying the same sort of tax breaks.

Grant Launches Center for Effective Data and Evidence Use by Local Government

Three-term New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg has committed funds to launch a Johns Hopkins University effort helping cities use data to run more effective operations and fix urban problems.