About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Pioneers Method to Examine How Immunotherapy Changes Tumors

Johns Hopkins University engineers are the first to use a non-invasive optical probe to understand the complex changes in tumors after immunotherapy, a treatment that harnesses the immune system to fight cancer. Their method combines detailed mapping of the biochemical composition of tumors with machine learning.

Vision for Baltimore Linked to Higher Test Scores for City Students

Baltimore students who received eyeglasses through the Vision for Baltimore program scored higher on reading and math tests, with students who struggle the most academically showing the greatest improvement, concludes a new study in JAMA Ophthalmology, conducted by Johns Hopkins researchers from the Wilmer Eye Institute and School of Education.

The study, released today, is the most robust to date in the United States on the impact of glasses on academic achievement and has implications beyond Baltimore for the millions of children nationwide who suffer from vision impairment but lack access to pediatric eye care.

Eyeglasses for School Kids Boosts Academic Performance

Students who received eyeglasses through a school-based program scored higher on reading and math tests, Johns Hopkins researchers from the Wilmer Eye Institute and School of Education found in the largest clinical study of the impact of glasses on education ever conducted in the United States. The students who struggled the most academically showed the greatest improvement.

New Tool Predicts Sudden Death in Inflammatory Heart Disease

Johns Hopkins University scientists have developed a new tool for predicting which patients suffering from a complex inflammatory heart disease are at risk of sudden cardiac arrest.

Team Find Brain Mechanism That Automatically Links Objects in Our Minds

When people see a toothbrush, a car, a tree — any individual object — their brain automatically associates it with other things it naturally occurs with, allowing humans to build context for their surroundings and set expectations for the world.

By using machine-learning and brain imaging, researchers measured the extent of the “co-occurrence” phenomenon and identified the brain region involved. The findings appear in Nature Communications.

Protein Appears to Prevent Tumor Cells from Spreading Via Blood Vessels

Researchers have identified a specialized protein that appears to help prevent tumor cells from entering the bloodstream and spreading to other parts of the body.

Vaccine Prioritization Dashboard Launches for People with Disabilities

A new Johns Hopkins data tool helps people with disabilities determine when they qualify for the COVID-19 vaccine and compares how different states prioritize the disability community in the vaccine rollout.

Created by researchers, students and advocates who themselves are disabled and have personally experienced how inequitable and inaccessible the pandemic response has been, the COVID-19 Vaccine Prioritization Dashboard launched to not only help the disability community get vaccinated, but also to arm policymakers with data to improve the system.

The Richer You are, The More Likely You’ll Social Distance, Study Finds

The higher a person’s income, the more likely they were to protect themselves at the early stages of the Covid-19 pandemic in the United States, Johns Hopkins University economists find.

When it comes to adopting behaviors including social distancing and mask wearing, the team detected a striking link to their financial well-being. People who made around $230,000 a year were as much as 54% more likely to increase these types of self-protective behaviors compared to people making about $13,000.

Machine Learning Tool Gives Early Warning Of Cardiac Issues in COVID Patients

A team of Johns Hopkins University biomedical engineers and heart specialists have developed an algorithm that warns doctors several hours before hospitalized COVID-19 patients experience cardiac arrest or blood clots.

Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center Passes 1 Billion Views

The Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center, a site launched in the spring of 2020 to offer critical data and perspective during the pandemic, logged its one billionth page view today.

JHU Undergrads Win $250,000 Prize in Global Mask Design Challenge

A Johns Hopkins University team of 24 undergraduate students that’s come up with a clear, adaptable face mask has won the Future Forward Award in a global challenge to design a better mask.

Vaccine Tracker Now Available on Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center

Johns Hopkins University’s Coronavirus Resource Center has launched a tracking tool to offer daily updates and nationwide perspective on the progress of the COVID-19 vaccination rollout in the United States.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Adds County-Level Hospital, ICU Occupancy Data to Coronavirus Resource Center

To offer perspective on how the nation’s hospitals are managing the surge of COVID-19 patients, the Johns Hopkins University Coronavirus Resource Center is now tracking county-level hospital occupancy data, with fresh updates every day.

This is Your Brain on Code: JHU Deciphers Neural Mechanics of Computer Programming

By mapping the brain activity of expert computer programmers while they puzzled over code, Johns Hopkins University scientists have found the neural mechanics behind this increasingly vital skill.

Johns Hopkins Develops Potential Antibiotic For Drug-Resistant Pathogen

Scientists from Johns Hopkins University and Medicine have developed a possible new antibiotic for a pathogen that is notoriously resistant to medications and frequently lethal for people with cystic fibrosis and other lung ailments.

JHU Team’s Acoustic Sensor Wins Runner-Up Award in Inventors Competition

A team of Johns Hopkins University graduate students that invented a sensor that ignores background noise and could improve everything from telemedicine to Zoom calls has won the Runner-Up Award in the Collegiate Inventors Competition.

Researchers Discover ‘Spooky’ Similarity In How Brains and Computers See

The brain detects 3D shape fragments (bumps, hollows, shafts, spheres) in the beginning stages of object vision – a newly discovered strategy of natural intelligence that Johns Hopkins University researchers also found in artificial intelligence networks trained to recognize visual objects.

New Test Can Target and Capture Most Lethal Cells in Fatal Brain Cancer

A laboratory test developed by a research team led by Johns Hopkins University bioengineers can accurately pinpoint, capture and analyze the deadliest cells in the most common and aggressive brain cancer in adults.

Two Johns Hopkins Teams Finalists in Collegiate Inventors Competition

One team has invented a tool that could shave hours from a rhinoplasty. Another has created a sensor that ignores background noise – a device that could improve everything from telemedicine to Zoom calls.

These two Johns Hopkins University teams, a group of undergraduates and a group of graduates, are among the finalists announced today by the Collegiate Inventors Competition, an annual contest founded by the National Inventors Hall of Fame to encourage innovation and entrepreneurship at the collegiate level.

Research Shows Septic Shock Starts Earlier Than Understood And Develops Distinct Levels Of Patient Risk

Johns Hopkins researchers have shown that hospitals can more accurately classify sepsis patients into four distinct categories that would help staff better prioritize early interventions for those at the risk of dying from one of the deadliest, most costly medical conditions in the United States.

JHU Robotic System Remotely Controls Ventilators In COVID-19 Patient Rooms

August 12, 2020 CONTACT: Doug Donovan Cell: 443-462-2947 dougdonovan@jhu.edu @dougdonovan A new robotic system allows medical staff to remotely operate ventilators and other bedside machines from outside intensive care rooms of patients suffering from infectious diseases. The system, developed by a team of Johns Hopkins University and Medicine researchers, is still being tested, but initial […]

Johns Hopkins Researchers to Use Machine Learning to Predict Heart Damage in COVID-19 Victims

Johns Hopkins researchers recently received a $195,000 Rapid Response Research grant from the National Science Foundation to, using machine learning, identify which COVID-19 patients are at risk of adverse cardiac events such as heart failure, sustained abnormal heartbeats, heart attacks, cardiogenic shock and death.

Lighting the Way to Safer Heart Procedures

In the first study of its kind, Johns Hopkins researchers provide evidence that an alternative imaging technique could someday replace current methods that require potentially harmful radiation.

Hopkins Gets FDA OK to Test Blood Therapies for COVID-19 Patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a clinical trial Friday that will allow Johns Hopkins University researchers to test a therapy for COVID-19 that uses plasma from recovering patients.

Johns Hopkins Engineers Developing 3D-printed Ventilator Splitter

In response to a pressing need for more ventilators to treat critically ill COVID-19 patients, a team led by Johns Hopkins University engineers is developing and prototyping a 3D-printed splitter that will allow a single ventilator to treat multiple patients. Though medical professionals have expressed concerns about the safety and effectiveness of sharing ventilators, the team has designed this tool to address those concerns.