About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Don’t Miss a Beat: Computer Simulations May Treat Most Common Heart Rhythm Disorder

Scientists at Johns Hopkins have successfully created personalized digital replicas of the upper chambers of the heart and used them to guide the precise treatment of patients suffering from persistent irregular heartbeats. These simulations accurately identified where clinicians need to destroy tissue to restore the heart’s normal rhythm.

JHU: How Some Older Brains Decline Before People Realize It

Some older adults without noticeable cognitive problems have a harder time than younger people in separating irrelevant information from what they need to know at a given time, and a new Johns Hopkins University study could explain why.

Cancer Tissue-Freezing Approach May Help More Breast Cancer Patients in Lower Income Countries

A new reusable device created by the Johns Hopkins University can help women with breast cancer in lower income countries by using carbon dioxide, a widely available and affordable gas, to power a cancer tissue-freezing probe instead of industry-standard argon.

A Snapshot in Time: Study Captures Fleeting Cell Differences That Can Alter Disease Risk

In cinema and science fiction, one small change in the past can have major, sometimes life-changing effects in the future. Using a series of snapshots, researchers recently captured such so-called “butterfly effects” in heart muscle cell development, and say this new view into the sequence of gene expression activity may lead to better understanding disease risk.

New Analysis Predicts Top 25 U.S. Counties at Risk for Measles Outbreaks

A new analysis co-led by The Johns Hopkins University identified 25 United States counties that are most likely to experience measles outbreaks in 2019. The analysis combined international air travel volume, non-medical exemptions from childhood vaccinations, population data and reported measles outbreak information.

Johns Hopkins Grad Programs Rank Among Nation’s Best

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in public health, nursing and medicine are once again among the country’s very best, according to the annual U.S. News & World Report ranking of the nation’s “Best Graduate Schools.”

Shedding Light—Literally—on Resistance to Radiation Therapy

A new Johns Hopkins study offers promise towards someday being able to non-invasively examine changes in cancerous tumors to determine whether they’ll respond to radiation treatment, before treatment even begins.

MEDIA ADVISORY: JHU Expert Available on Implications of 3-Parent Baby

A 32-year-old Greek woman is reportedly pregnant from an experimental reproductive technique that uses DNA from three people, the result of the first known clinical trial to use the controversial procedure to treat infertility. 

Jeffrey Kahn, director of Johns Hopkins University’s Berman Institute of Bioethics, who chaired a 2016 U.S. National Academy of Sciences panel that examined the science and ethical issues raised by the three-parent procedure, is available to discuss the implications of this new pregnancy and the procedure, known as mitochondrial replacement therapy, which is banned in the United States.

JHU to Host Science Internships for Minorities, Students Lacking Access to Advanced Research

The Johns Hopkins University has been awarded more than $600,000 to offer summer research experiences for undergraduates from backgrounds underrepresented in science and whose own colleges and universities offer limited chances to work on original research.

JHU collaborates with Morgan, Coppin to promote STEM diversity

With $2.46 million in support from the National Institutes of Health, the Johns Hopkins University is teaming up with two historically black Baltimore institutions, Morgan State and Coppin State universities, to cultivate a diverse group of highly trained biomedical researchers.

Johns Hopkins Faculty Members Elected To National Academy of Medicine

Six faculty members from the Johns Hopkins University have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available

Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available.

New ‘E-Dermis’ Brings Sense of Touch, Pain to Prosthetic Hands

Engineers have created an electronic skin, aiming to restore a real sense of touch for amputees using prosthetic hands.

Science and Health News Tips from Johns Hopkins

News tips for reporters from stories in the spring 2018 issue of Johns Hopkins Magazine.

New Computational Strategy Designed for More Personalized Cancer Treatment

Mathematicians and cancer scientists have found a way to simplify complex biomolecular data about tumors, in principle making it easier to prescribe the appropriate treatment for a specific patient.

Souped-up Walker to Help Get Pediatric ICU Patients on Their Feet

An undergraduate student design team is developing a walker designed to help get pediatric ICU patients up and moving as quickly as possible.

Smartphone ‘Scores’ Can Help Doctors Track Severity of Parkinson’s Disease Symptoms

Parkinson’s disease, a progressive brain disorder, is often tough to treat effectively because symptoms, such as tremors and walking difficulties, can vary dramatically over a period of days, or even hours. To address this challenge, Johns Hopkins University computer scientists, working with an interdisciplinary team of experts from two other institutions, have developed a new approach that uses sensors on a smartphone to generate a score that reliably reflects symptom severity in patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Johns Hopkins Grad Programs Rank Among Nation’s Best

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in biomedical engineering, nursing and medicine are once again among the country’s very best, according to the annual U.S. News & World Report ranking of the nation’s “Best Graduate Schools.”

Science and Health News Tips from Johns Hopkins

These news tips come from stories in the winter issue of Johns Hopkins Magazine.

JHU Researchers Elected Into National Academy of Engineering

Two Johns Hopkins University researchers were awarded one of the highest professional distinctions for engineers: election into the National Academy of Engineering.

JHU Finds How Brain Instantly Tells Trash from Treasure

Johns Hopkins University neuroscientists have found how the brain can detect an object’s value almost as soon as we see it.

Mind of a Medalist: Scientists Explain How the Brain Can Lead to Olympic Gold

Any athlete who’s made it to the Olympics has speed or strength or whatever physical skills it takes to lead the world in their sport. But Johns Hopkins University scientists say those who ultimately bring home gold have also honed the mind of a medalist.

Kidney Disease Expert Wins University’s Frontier Award

Deidra Crews, an expert on chronic kidney disease and on racial disparities in the condition’s impact and treatment, is the 2018 winner of the university’s $250,000 President’s Frontier Award. With video of surprise presentation.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Super Bowl Marks the Season’s End, But Concussion Concerns Continue

During this year’s Super Bowl, K.T. Ramesh, a biomechanics expert at Johns Hopkins University, will pay more attention to the collateral damage that can occur during football games: head injuries. He is developing a technological tool to help better diagnose concussions and predict where related brain damage has likely occurred.

Johns Hopkins Engineering Students Build Custom Walker for Special Needs Toddler

Santa’s helpers made a visit to the Port Deposit, Maryland, family this week, delivering a gift that promises to make their holiday season especially happy and bright: a walker that was custom-designed and constructed for the family’s smallest member by a group of Johns Hopkins engineering students.