About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Physics Fair Returns to Homewood Campus

The Johns Hopkins University’s Department of Physics and Astronomy is hosting its 15th Annual Physics Fair from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 21, on the Homewood campus, 3400 N. Charles St. in Baltimore. Events will take place in the Bloomberg Center for Physics and Astronomy, located on the north end of the campus near Homewood Field.

Local Girl Scouts to Build Mini Roller Coasters During Contest at Johns Hopkins

Maryland Girl Scouts will learn about the physics involved in how roller coasters work and what it takes to be an engineer. Then, the scout troops will design and build their own mini roller coasters.

JHU Performs First Lab Simulation of Exoplanet Atmospheric Chemistry

Scientists have conducted the first lab experiments on haze formation in simulated exoplanet atmospheres, an important step for understanding upcoming observations of planets outside the solar system with the James Webb Space Telescope.

Johns Hopkins Scientist Proposes New Definition of a Planet

Pluto hogs the spotlight in the continuing scientific debate over what is and what is not a planet, but a less conspicuous argument rages on about the planetary status of massive objects outside our solar system. The dispute is not just about semantics, as it is closely related to how giant planets like Jupiter form. Johns Hopkins University astrophysicist Kevin Schlaufman aims to settle the dispute.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Explain Rudolph, Grinch, Scrooge

This festive season, Johns Hopkins University researchers dug deep into their reserves of scientific expertise to explain how these unexplainable plot lines in holiday classics like Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer, The Grinch That Stole Christmas, and A Christmas Carol just might be (almost) (possibly) possible.

Johns Hopkins Astrophysicist Shares $3 Million Breakthrough Prize

Bloomberg Distinguished Professor Charles L. Bennett of Johns Hopkins University has been named a recipient of the Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics for his work that established the Standard Model of Cosmology – a precise physics-based description of the contents, dynamics, and shape of the universe.

JHU Scientist Crowdsources Rocks Harboring Earthly “Extraterrestrials”

Crowdsourcing has been used to create an online photography archive, finance a British rock band’s tour and search for intelligent life on other planets. Now, Johns Hopkins University biologist Jocelyne DiRuggiero is hoping the approach can help her find rocks.

Science and Health News Tips from Johns Hopkins

These news tips, from stories in the fall 2017 issue of Johns Hopkins Magazine, include an engineer/fisherman’s idea for a “smart” lure and the need for a really high SPF sunscreen for a new solar probe.

Media Advisory: Cassini Saturn Mission Team Member at Johns Hopkins Available to Talk About What Scientists Have Discovered and the Work Ahead

Professor Darrell Strobel, an astrophysicist with the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Johns Hopkins University, has been part of the Cassini-Huygens mission from the early planning stages and is available to speak with reporters.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Eclipse Party

August 17, 2017 CONTACT: Jill Rosen Office: 443-997-9906 Cell: 443-547-8805 jrosen@jhu.edu @JHUmediareps WHAT: Solar eclipse watch party WHERE: The Beach at Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus, 3400 N. Charles St. The “beach” is the grassy area in front of the Milton S. Eisenhower Library. WHEN: From 1:30 to 3:30 p.m., Monday Aug. 21 Details: University […]

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Physics Fair Returns to Homewood Campus

The Johns Hopkins University’s Department of Physics and Astronomy is hosting its 14th Annual Physics Fair. The day will include more than 200 physics demonstrations.

Media Advisory: Astronaut Kate Rubins to Speak at Johns Hopkins University

Kate Rubins, the first person to sequence DNA in space aboard the International Space Station last year, will talk about her work as a scientist and astronaut.

Scientists Make the Case to Restore Pluto’s Planet Status

Johns Hopkins University scientist Kirby Runyon wants to make one thing clear: Regardless of what one prestigious scientific organization says to the contrary, Pluto is a planet. So is Europa, commonly known as a moon of Jupiter, and the Earth’s Moon, and more than 100 other celestial bodies in our solar system that are denied this status under a prevailing definition of “planet.”

Exotic Insulator May Hold Clue to Key Mystery of Modern Physics

Experiments using laser light and pieces of gray material the size of fingernail clippings may offer clues to a fundamental scientific riddle: what is the relationship between the everyday world of classical physics and the hidden quantum realm that obeys entirely different rules?

Scientists Find New Ways to Track Stars Eaten by Black Holes

Research led by Johns Hopkins University astrophysicists using information from a NASA space telescope breaks new ground in ways to observe a star swallowed by a black hole, promising to help paint a more clear picture of this cosmic phenomenon.

Can One Cosmic Enigma Help Solve Another?

Astrophysicists from Johns Hopkins University have proposed a clever new way of shedding light on the mysterious dark matter believed to make up most of the universe. The irony is they want to try to pin down the nature of this unexplained phenomenon by using another, an obscure cosmic emanation known as “fast radio bursts.”

Did Gravitational Wave Detector Find Dark Matter?

When an astronomical observatory in the United States this winter detected a whisper of two black holes colliding in deep space, scientists celebrated a successful effort to confirm Albert Einstein’s prediction of gravitational waves. A team of Johns Hopkins University astrophysicists wondered about something else: Had the experiment found the “dark matter” that makes up most of the mass of the universe?

Universe Expanding Faster Than Scientists Predicted

The universe appears to be expanding faster now than predicted by measurements of the rate as seen shortly after the Big Bang, a study led by a Johns Hopkins University scientist has found.

Telescope Peering into Origins of the Universe Receives “First Light”

High in the Andes Mountains of northern Chile a unique Johns Hopkins University observatory has just achieved “first light,” the first time the telescope has collected radiation from space.

Johns Hopkins Faculty Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Four Johns Hopkins University faculty members are among the new scholars elected to the National Academy of Sciences today in recognition of their “distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.”

Johns Hopkins Researchers Aim for Safer, More Efficient Rocket Engines

The U.S. Air Force has awarded two contracts totaling $1.48 million to the Energetics Research Group, based within Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering, to help set the stage for the next generation of U.S.-made rocket engines. The funding will be used to reduce risks associated with new technologies that may replace the Russian-made RD-180 engine.

Johns Hopkins Physics Fair Returns to Homewood Campus

Scientists will reveal invisible forces in the universe, students will compete for prizes and balloon rockets will be launched as the Johns Hopkins University’s Department of Physics and Astronomy holds its 13th Annual Physics Fair on Saturday, April 16 on the Homewood campus, 3400 N. Charles St. in Baltimore.

New Research Shows Quasars Slowed Star Formation

Research led by Johns Hopkins University scientists has found new persuasive evidence that could help solve a long-standing mystery in astrophysics: why did the pace of star formation in the universe slow down some 11 billion years ago?

Johns Hopkins Rocketeers Launch Their Most Sensitive Instrument Yet

Rocketeers led by Johns Hopkins University astrophysicist Stephan R. McCandliss just launched the most sensitive instrument they’ve ever used to explore outer space, seeking clues to how galaxies grow with the birth of new stars, and how they stop growing.

Scientists Get First Glimpse of Black Hole Eating Star, Ejecting High-Speed Flare

An international team of astrophysicists led by a Johns Hopkins University scientist has for the first time witnessed a black hole swallowing a star and ejecting a flare of matter moving at nearly the speed of light.