About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Releases Comprehensive Report on Digital Contact Tracing to Aid COVID-19 Response

Johns Hopkins University today released a comprehensive report to help government, technology developers, businesses, institutional leaders and the public make responsible decisions around use of digital contact tracing technology (DCTT), including smartphone apps and other tools, to fight COVID-19.

Johns Hopkins Researchers to Use Machine Learning to Predict Heart Damage in COVID-19 Victims

Johns Hopkins researchers recently received a $195,000 Rapid Response Research grant from the National Science Foundation to, using machine learning, identify which COVID-19 patients are at risk of adverse cardiac events such as heart failure, sustained abnormal heartbeats, heart attacks, cardiogenic shock and death.

Johns Hopkins Taps Twitter to Measure Success of Social Distancing

By comparing Twitter data from before and after the COVID-19 outbreak, Johns Hopkins University researchers found a profound impact on the movement of Americans – indicating social distancing recommendations are having an effect.

Hopkins Gets FDA OK to Test Blood Therapies for COVID-19 Patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a clinical trial Friday that will allow Johns Hopkins University researchers to test a therapy for COVID-19 that uses plasma from recovering patients.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Expert Available to Discuss Use of Robots to Combat COVID-19

In a new Science Robotics editorial published today, experts discuss the potential use of robots to combat COVID-19 by decreasing risks posed to humans, safely resuming halted manufacturing and making teleoperations more efficient. Much of the work required in combatting COVID-19 requires “dull, dirty, and extremely dangerous tasks for human workers but suitable to robots,” the editorial authors say, and they point to potential uses such as disinfecting operating rooms, taking temperatures at ports of entry, delivering medications and more.

Russell (Russ) Taylor, Director of the Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics at The Johns Hopkins University, and an author on the editorial, is available to talk about the future of robotics and COVID-19.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins University Upgrades COVID-19 Tracking Map With Local U.S. Data

The Johns Hopkins University’s COVID-19 tracking map, which has become a vital worldwide resource, is launching an updated dashboard to report coronavirus cases for every city and county in the United States.

ADVISORY: Expert Available to Comment on Effects of Social Distancing and Quarantine Measures on Air Quality

A silver lining of social distancing and quarantine? Better air quality. As more and more cities across the U.S. clamp down on travel, there have been fewer cars on the road and early reports of improved air quality in cities like Los Angeles, Philadelphia and more. Peter DeCarlo, an associate professor in the Department of Environmental Health and Engineering at The Johns Hopkins University, can discuss how and to what extent social distancing and quarantine measures affect air pollution.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins University Experts to Brief Capitol Hill on Coronavirus

Johns Hopkins University experts in public health, infectious disease, and emergency preparedness will offer a briefing this Friday for Capitol Hill officials seeking facts and perspective on COVID-19 and the new coronavirus as it spreads worldwide.

ADVISORY: Experts Available to Discuss Role of Antibiotic Resistance in Pandemic Risk

Researchers investigating the drug prescription response to a “superbug” enzyme that renders bacteria resistant to antibiotics are available to discuss why such resistance is posing a growing risk during pandemics such as the current coronavirus.

ADVISORY: Experts Available to Discuss Improving Rapid Detection of Pandemics

Scientists developing a rapid system for tackling outbreaks of avian influenza at their origins in Thailand are available to discuss their project and how it could potentially help improve responses to other pandemic threats such as coronavirus.

ADVISORY: JHU Experts Distill Coronavirus Facts in Web Event

Today a panel of Johns Hopkins University experts convened to offer facts on the outbreak of 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV), originating in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China, a virus that is spreading across the globe and has been declared a public health emergency by the World Health Organization and the U.S. government.

ADVISORY: Expert Available to Discuss How Racism, Xenophobia Can Spread in Tandem with Coronavirus

A sociology professor at Johns Hopkins University is available to discuss how the racist and xenophobic treatment of people of Chinese ancestry often escalates during outbreaks of disease such as the current coronavirus that began in China and is spreading worldwide.

ADVISORY: Expert Available to Discuss How China’s Politics Affect Coronavirus Response

A sociology professor at Johns Hopkins University is available to discuss whether China’s hardened domestic authoritarianism and expanded global influence since the 2003 SARS outbreak is helping or hindering the international response to the new coronavirus. 

ADVISORY: Expert Available to Discuss Tracking of Coronavirus

A co-director of the Johns Hopkins University Center for Systems Science and Engineering is available to discuss the center’s website, launched today to track the international spread of coronavirus in real time. The data visualizations are all available for download. 

Beyond Tofurky: Can the Alt-Meat Trend Reach Thanksgiving?

Jan Dutkiewicz, a political scientist at Johns Hopkins and an expert in the alternative meat industry, can explain:
How the history of the Impossible Burger and other popular alternative meats can be traced to Thanksgiving.
Why despite the current plant-based meat craze, there is not yet a turkey option that’s created as much buzz.
How in the future Thanksgivings, with lab-grown meat soon to be available, people might be able to buy turkey created in a petri dish.

Cancer Tissue-Freezing Approach May Help More Breast Cancer Patients in Lower Income Countries

A new reusable device created by the Johns Hopkins University can help women with breast cancer in lower income countries by using carbon dioxide, a widely available and affordable gas, to power a cancer tissue-freezing probe instead of industry-standard argon.

New Analysis Predicts Top 25 U.S. Counties at Risk for Measles Outbreaks

A new analysis co-led by The Johns Hopkins University identified 25 United States counties that are most likely to experience measles outbreaks in 2019. The analysis combined international air travel volume, non-medical exemptions from childhood vaccinations, population data and reported measles outbreak information.

Johns Hopkins Grad Programs Rank Among Nation’s Best

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in public health, nursing and medicine are once again among the country’s very best, according to the annual U.S. News & World Report ranking of the nation’s “Best Graduate Schools.”

Media Advisory: Hundreds of College Students to Gather at Johns Hopkins for Weekend Hackathon

February 11, 2019 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Shani McPherson Office: 410-516-4778 Cell: 510-393-7159 sprovos1@jhu.edu WHAT: More than 300 graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University this weekend for the latest HopHacks, a marathon session challenging students to realize their best software and hardware ideas and compete for cash […]

MEDIA ADVISORY: JHU Expert Available on Implications of 3-Parent Baby

A 32-year-old Greek woman is reportedly pregnant from an experimental reproductive technique that uses DNA from three people, the result of the first known clinical trial to use the controversial procedure to treat infertility. 

Jeffrey Kahn, director of Johns Hopkins University’s Berman Institute of Bioethics, who chaired a 2016 U.S. National Academy of Sciences panel that examined the science and ethical issues raised by the three-parent procedure, is available to discuss the implications of this new pregnancy and the procedure, known as mitochondrial replacement therapy, which is banned in the United States.

What Looks Like Substance Abuse Could be Self-Medication, Study Finds

When improved antidepressants hit the market in the 1980s, heavy drinking among people with depression dropped 22 percent, suggesting people who knowingly use drugs and alcohol to relieve mental and physical pain will switch to safer, better treatment options when they can get them, a new Johns Hopkins University study found.

Advisory: JHU Expert Available on Lab-Grown Meat

Aleph Farms of Israel announced today unveiled the world’s first lab-grown steak, a steak grown in a petri dish that has the taste and texture of one that comes from a real cow. Other companies are also racing to perfect various versions of lab-grown meat. Jan Dutkiewicz, a postdoctoral fellow in political science at Johns Hopkins University who has researched the emergence of cellular agriculture, or “lab-grown meat,” and its potential to transform the American food landscape, is available to talk about the new steak and offer perspective on the development.

Johns Hopkins Faculty Members Elected To National Academy of Medicine

Six faculty members from the Johns Hopkins University have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine.

High Water Bills Can Unintentionally Harm Disadvantaged Tenants

Landlords in disadvantaged communities are so unsettled by increasing water bills and nuisance fees they are taking it out their tenants, threatening the housing security of those who need it most, a new Johns Hopkins University study concludes.

ADVISORY: At JHU This Weekend, Students to Hack to Improve City Life

More than 300 graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University for the latest 36-hour HopHacks, a marathon session challenging students to come up with software and hardware ideas.