About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Expert Available to Discuss Use of Robots to Combat COVID-19

In a new Science Robotics editorial published today, experts discuss the potential use of robots to combat COVID-19 by decreasing risks posed to humans, safely resuming halted manufacturing and making teleoperations more efficient. Much of the work required in combatting COVID-19 requires “dull, dirty, and extremely dangerous tasks for human workers but suitable to robots,” the editorial authors say, and they point to potential uses such as disinfecting operating rooms, taking temperatures at ports of entry, delivering medications and more.

Russell (Russ) Taylor, Director of the Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics at The Johns Hopkins University, and an author on the editorial, is available to talk about the future of robotics and COVID-19.

Johns Hopkins University statement on malware disguised as COVID-19 map

Johns Hopkins University has learned about the existence of malware designed to look like the university’s coronavirus tracking map in an effort to steal information from users who visit the fake site.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins University Experts to Brief Capitol Hill on Coronavirus

Johns Hopkins University experts in public health, infectious disease, and emergency preparedness will offer a briefing this Friday for Capitol Hill officials seeking facts and perspective on COVID-19 and the new coronavirus as it spreads worldwide.

Breakthrough Method for Processing Nanomaterials Heralds Advances in Quantum Computing, Nanotechnology

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have developed a new method for producing atomically-thin semiconducting crystals that could one day enable more powerful and compact electronic devices.

By using specially-treated silicon surfaces to tailor the crystals’ size and shape, the researchers have found a potentially faster and less expensive way to produce next-generation semiconductor crystals for microchips. The crystalline materials produced this way could in turn enable new scientific discoveries and accelerate technological developments in quantum computing, consumer electronics, and higher efficiency solar cells and batteries.

Sounds of Mosquito Mating Rituals Could Lead to Quieter Drones, Nontoxic Pest Control

Mosquitoes flap their wings not just to stay aloft but for two other critical purposes: to generate sound and to point that buzz in the direction of a potential mate, researchers at Johns Hopkins University have discovered. Their findings about the aerodynamics of mosquito wings could have implications for building quieter drones and for devising nontoxic methods to trap and exterminate the pests.

JHU Mind Games: Researchers Get Humans to Think Like Computers

Computers, like those that power self-driving cars, can be tricked into mistaking random scribbles for trains, fences and even school busses. People aren’t supposed to be able to see how those images trip up computers but in a new study, Johns Hopkins University researchers show most people actually can.

Media Advisory: Cyber Security Conference at Johns Hopkins University Features Experts from Academia and Industry

The 5th Annual Cyber Security Conference for Executives, co-sponsored by Johns Hopkins University and business advisory and expert services firm Ankura, presents a forum for experts from academia, private business, and government to share their knowledge and experience.

More Flexible Nanomaterials Can Make Fuel Cell Cars Cheaper

A new method of increasing the reactivity of ultrathin nanosheets, just a few atoms thick, can someday make fuel cells for hydrogen cars cheaper, finds a new Johns Hopkins study.

Media Advisory: Hundreds of College Students to Gather at Johns Hopkins for Weekend Hackathon

February 11, 2019 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Shani McPherson Office: 410-516-4778 Cell: 510-393-7159 sprovos1@jhu.edu WHAT: More than 300 graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University this weekend for the latest HopHacks, a marathon session challenging students to realize their best software and hardware ideas and compete for cash […]

Demi Lovato’s Overdose Causes Surge in Media, but Few Mentions of Lifesaving Hotline

Demi Lovato’s drug overdose and Anthony Bourdain’s suicide resulted in unequal news coverage of national help hotlines, finds a new study published Jan. 14 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Advisory: JHU Expert Available on Lab-Grown Meat

Aleph Farms of Israel announced today unveiled the world’s first lab-grown steak, a steak grown in a petri dish that has the taste and texture of one that comes from a real cow. Other companies are also racing to perfect various versions of lab-grown meat. Jan Dutkiewicz, a postdoctoral fellow in political science at Johns Hopkins University who has researched the emergence of cellular agriculture, or “lab-grown meat,” and its potential to transform the American food landscape, is available to talk about the new steak and offer perspective on the development.

Insight Into Swimming Fish Could Lead to Robotics Advances

The constant movement of fish that seems random is actually precisely deployed to provide them at any moment with the best sensory feedback they need any to navigate the world, Johns Hopkins University researchers found.

ADVISORY: At JHU This Weekend, Students to Hack to Improve City Life

More than 300 graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University for the latest 36-hour HopHacks, a marathon session challenging students to come up with software and hardware ideas.

Baltimore Students to Take ‘Wakanda Challenge’ at Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Event

At the annual meeting of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, the nation’s largest gathering of black elected officials, about 100 students from Baltimore City’s Dunbar High School will participate in an event called the STEAM Revolt Youth Workshop: Wakanda Design Challenge. In this interactive contest, students, who are part of Dunbar’s P-TECH college prep program, will create a new Avengers superhero with ties to African culture.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available

Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available.

Johns Hopkins University Leads New Research Partnership

Johns Hopkins University has been awarded up to $30 million to lead a consortium of three Mid-Atlantic universities that will work together on research projects with the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

JHU Project Aims to Save Millions by Reducing Solar Power Forecast Errors

Although the popularity of solar energy has surged, the unpredictability of a weather-dependent technology has kept even more people from embracing it. A new Johns Hopkins University-led project hopes to change that by improving our ability to forecast sunshine and backup power needs.

New Computational Strategy Designed for More Personalized Cancer Treatment

Mathematicians and cancer scientists have found a way to simplify complex biomolecular data about tumors, in principle making it easier to prescribe the appropriate treatment for a specific patient.

Johns Hopkins Physics Fair Returns to Homewood Campus

The Johns Hopkins University’s Department of Physics and Astronomy is hosting its 15th Annual Physics Fair from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 21, on the Homewood campus, 3400 N. Charles St. in Baltimore. Events will take place in the Bloomberg Center for Physics and Astronomy, located on the north end of the campus near Homewood Field.

JHU and Lockheed Martin to Host Science and Engineering Expo at Baltimore City School

The Johns Hopkins University, Lockheed Martin and Barclay Elementary/Middle School will come together for an evening designed to showcase the science and engineering projects that students have been working on in the classroom all year.

JHU Records Brain Activity of a Free-flying Bat

Johns Hopkins University researchers have developed a way to study the brain of a bat as it flies, recording for the first time what happens as an animal focuses its attention.

Smartphone ‘Scores’ Can Help Doctors Track Severity of Parkinson’s Disease Symptoms

Parkinson’s disease, a progressive brain disorder, is often tough to treat effectively because symptoms, such as tremors and walking difficulties, can vary dramatically over a period of days, or even hours. To address this challenge, Johns Hopkins University computer scientists, working with an interdisciplinary team of experts from two other institutions, have developed a new approach that uses sensors on a smartphone to generate a score that reliably reflects symptom severity in patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Diverse Metals Mix it Up in Novel Nanoparticles

Johns Hopkins researchers have teamed with colleagues from three other universities to combine up to eight different metals into single, uniformly mixed nanoparticles.

Local Girl Scouts to Build Mini Roller Coasters During Contest at Johns Hopkins

Maryland Girl Scouts will learn about the physics involved in how roller coasters work and what it takes to be an engineer. Then, the scout troops will design and build their own mini roller coasters.

Hacker-Resistant Power Plant Software Gets a Glowing Tryout in Hawaii

Johns Hopkins computer security experts recently traveled to Hawaii to see how well their hacker-resistant software would operate within a working but currently offline Honolulu power plant. The successful resilience testing, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, was triggered in part by growing concerns about the vulnerability of electric power grids after two high-profile cyber-attacks turned out the lights in parts of Ukraine during the past two years.