About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Team Details Lack of Daily Data on COVID-19

The Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center today published a new graphic visualization and analysis detailing the troubling trend of U.S. states eliminating daily reporting of COVID-19 data.

According to Coronavirus Resource Center experts, the reduction in daily reporting on cases, hospitalizations, deaths, and other vital data is taking place at a time when more public data is needed, not less — as the highly transmissible Delta variant is driving a new surge in the pandemic.

Johns Hopkins Expert Can Discuss Apple’s Plan to Monitor iPhones for Child Sexual Abuse

Apple has announced plans to scan iPhones and other Apple devices for images of child sexual abuse and report them to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. A Johns Hopkins University expert is available to discuss how the technology works, as well as potential privacy concerns.

Handwriting Beats Typing and Watching Videos for Learning to Read

Though writing by hand is increasingly being eclipsed by the ease of computers, a new study finds we shouldn’t be so quick to throw away the pencils and paper: handwriting helps people learn certain skills surprisingly faster and significantly better than learning the same material through typing or watching videos.

Johns Hopkins Experts Available to Discuss New White House Cybersecurity Directive

The Biden Administration is urging corporate executives and business leaders to take immediate steps to counter ransomware attacks following major cybersecurity breaches in the U.S. oil and meat industries. Johns Hopkins University experts are available to offer perspective on the new guidelines.

Researchers Find Semimetal That Clings to a Quantum Precipice

In an open access paper published in Science Advances, Johns Hopkins physicists and colleagues at Rice University, the Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), present experimental evidence of naturally occurring quantum criticality in a material.

Johns Hopkins Launches Pandemic Data Initiative to Spotlight COVID-19 Data Problems

The Johns Hopkins University’s Coronavirus Resource Center on May 17 is launching the Pandemic Data Initiative as a new resource to spotlight systemic deficiencies in the collecting and reporting of pandemic data, to examine how those challenges hinder COVID-19 responses, and to explore possible solutions to improve public data.

Vaccine Prioritization Dashboard Launches for People with Disabilities

A new Johns Hopkins data tool helps people with disabilities determine when they qualify for the COVID-19 vaccine and compares how different states prioritize the disability community in the vaccine rollout.

Created by researchers, students and advocates who themselves are disabled and have personally experienced how inequitable and inaccessible the pandemic response has been, the COVID-19 Vaccine Prioritization Dashboard launched to not only help the disability community get vaccinated, but also to arm policymakers with data to improve the system.

Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center Wins Research America Award

A major research and science organization on Tuesday awarded the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center a public health honor for providing reliable real time data and analysis to help inform national and international responses to COVID-19.

New Johns Hopkins Report Details Plan for Digital Equity in Baltimore

The lack of reliable access to broadband internet service for many in Baltimore, particularly the poor, has profound economic and social consequences. The COVID-19 pandemic has made this painfully clear with an abrupt shift to online learning, remote work, and telemedicine. A new analysis from Johns Hopkins University’s 21st Century Cities Initiative says the city could move towards digital equity, with a roadmap of recommendations built on existing knowledge of Baltimore’s digital assets and the experience of other cities.

Machine Learning Tool Gives Early Warning Of Cardiac Issues in COVID Patients

A team of Johns Hopkins University biomedical engineers and heart specialists have developed an algorithm that warns doctors several hours before hospitalized COVID-19 patients experience cardiac arrest or blood clots.

Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center Passes 1 Billion Views

The Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center, a site launched in the spring of 2020 to offer critical data and perspective during the pandemic, logged its one billionth page view today.

Vaccine Tracker Now Available on Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center

Johns Hopkins University’s Coronavirus Resource Center has launched a tracking tool to offer daily updates and nationwide perspective on the progress of the COVID-19 vaccination rollout in the United States.

This is Your Brain on Code: JHU Deciphers Neural Mechanics of Computer Programming

By mapping the brain activity of expert computer programmers while they puzzled over code, Johns Hopkins University scientists have found the neural mechanics behind this increasingly vital skill.

Johns Hopkins Team Develops Software That Cuts Time, Cost From Gene Sequencing

A team of Johns Hopkins University researchers has developed a new software that could revolutionize how DNA is sequenced, making it far faster and less expensive to map anything from yeast genomes to cancer genes.

JHU Team’s Acoustic Sensor Wins Runner-Up Award in Inventors Competition

A team of Johns Hopkins University graduate students that invented a sensor that ignores background noise and could improve everything from telemedicine to Zoom calls has won the Runner-Up Award in the Collegiate Inventors Competition.

Dog Training Methods Help JHU Teach Robots to Learn New Tricks

With a training technique commonly used to teach dogs to sit and stay, Johns Hopkins University computer scientists showed a robot how to teach itself several new tricks, including stacking blocks. With the method, the robot, named Spot, was able to learn in days what typically takes a month.

Two Johns Hopkins Teams Finalists in Collegiate Inventors Competition

One team has invented a tool that could shave hours from a rhinoplasty. Another has created a sensor that ignores background noise – a device that could improve everything from telemedicine to Zoom calls.

These two Johns Hopkins University teams, a group of undergraduates and a group of graduates, are among the finalists announced today by the Collegiate Inventors Competition, an annual contest founded by the National Inventors Hall of Fame to encourage innovation and entrepreneurship at the collegiate level.

Lauren Gardner Named To TIME 100 List Of World’s Most Influential People Of 2020

TIME named a Johns Hopkins University professor to its 2020 list of the 100 most influential people in the world for developing a free and open website that empowers the international community to track the COVID-19 pandemic in near-real time with reliable, independent data.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Expert Available to Discuss Use of Robots to Combat COVID-19

In a new Science Robotics editorial published today, experts discuss the potential use of robots to combat COVID-19 by decreasing risks posed to humans, safely resuming halted manufacturing and making teleoperations more efficient. Much of the work required in combatting COVID-19 requires “dull, dirty, and extremely dangerous tasks for human workers but suitable to robots,” the editorial authors say, and they point to potential uses such as disinfecting operating rooms, taking temperatures at ports of entry, delivering medications and more.

Russell (Russ) Taylor, Director of the Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics at The Johns Hopkins University, and an author on the editorial, is available to talk about the future of robotics and COVID-19.

Johns Hopkins University statement on malware disguised as COVID-19 map

Johns Hopkins University has learned about the existence of malware designed to look like the university’s coronavirus tracking map in an effort to steal information from users who visit the fake site.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins University Experts to Brief Capitol Hill on Coronavirus

Johns Hopkins University experts in public health, infectious disease, and emergency preparedness will offer a briefing this Friday for Capitol Hill officials seeking facts and perspective on COVID-19 and the new coronavirus as it spreads worldwide.

Breakthrough Method for Processing Nanomaterials Heralds Advances in Quantum Computing, Nanotechnology

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have developed a new method for producing atomically-thin semiconducting crystals that could one day enable more powerful and compact electronic devices.

By using specially-treated silicon surfaces to tailor the crystals’ size and shape, the researchers have found a potentially faster and less expensive way to produce next-generation semiconductor crystals for microchips. The crystalline materials produced this way could in turn enable new scientific discoveries and accelerate technological developments in quantum computing, consumer electronics, and higher efficiency solar cells and batteries.

Sounds of Mosquito Mating Rituals Could Lead to Quieter Drones, Nontoxic Pest Control

Mosquitoes flap their wings not just to stay aloft but for two other critical purposes: to generate sound and to point that buzz in the direction of a potential mate, researchers at Johns Hopkins University have discovered. Their findings about the aerodynamics of mosquito wings could have implications for building quieter drones and for devising nontoxic methods to trap and exterminate the pests.

JHU Mind Games: Researchers Get Humans to Think Like Computers

Computers, like those that power self-driving cars, can be tricked into mistaking random scribbles for trains, fences and even school busses. People aren’t supposed to be able to see how those images trip up computers but in a new study, Johns Hopkins University researchers show most people actually can.

Media Advisory: Cyber Security Conference at Johns Hopkins University Features Experts from Academia and Industry

The 5th Annual Cyber Security Conference for Executives, co-sponsored by Johns Hopkins University and business advisory and expert services firm Ankura, presents a forum for experts from academia, private business, and government to share their knowledge and experience.