About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Cells Can Walk a Microscopic Tightrope, Researchers Discover

By offering cells a microscopic “tightrope,” Johns Hopkins University and Virginia Tech scientists have discovered a new and surprising form of cellular movement.

Johns Hopkins Develops Potential Antibiotic For Drug-Resistant Pathogen

Scientists from Johns Hopkins University and Medicine have developed a possible new antibiotic for a pathogen that is notoriously resistant to medications and frequently lethal for people with cystic fibrosis and other lung ailments.

Johns Hopkins Team Develops Software That Cuts Time, Cost From Gene Sequencing

A team of Johns Hopkins University researchers has developed a new software that could revolutionize how DNA is sequenced, making it far faster and less expensive to map anything from yeast genomes to cancer genes.

Brain Region Tracking Food Preferences Could Steer Our Food Choices

Researchers discovered that a specific brain region monitors food preferences as they change across thirsty and quenched states. By targeting neurons in that part of the brain, they were able to shift food choice preferences from a more desired reward (think: chocolate cake) to a less tasty one (think: stale bread).

Bats Can Predict the Future, JHU Researchers Discover

They can’t tell fortunes and they’re useless with the stock market but bats are quite skilled at predicting one thing: where to find dinner.

Bats calculate where their prey is headed by building on-the-fly predictive models of target motion from echoes, Johns Hopkins University researchers find. The models are so robust, bats can continue to track prey even when it temporarily vanishes behind echo-blocking obstacles like trees.

Researchers Discover ‘Spooky’ Similarity In How Brains and Computers See

The brain detects 3D shape fragments (bumps, hollows, shafts, spheres) in the beginning stages of object vision – a newly discovered strategy of natural intelligence that Johns Hopkins University researchers also found in artificial intelligence networks trained to recognize visual objects.

New Test Can Target and Capture Most Lethal Cells in Fatal Brain Cancer

A laboratory test developed by a research team led by Johns Hopkins University bioengineers can accurately pinpoint, capture and analyze the deadliest cells in the most common and aggressive brain cancer in adults.

New Genetic Analysis Method Could Advance Personal Genomics

Geneticists could identify the causes of disorders that currently go undiagnosed if standard practices for collecting individual genetic information were expanded to capture more variants that researchers can now decipher, concludes new Johns Hopkins University research.

Abnormal Cells In Early-Stage Embryos Might Not Preclude IVF Success

The presence of an abnormal number of chromosomes in the genetic profile of early-stage embryos may be far more common – and potentially less threatening – during normal human development than is currently appreciated, according to new research from Johns Hopkins University biologists.

Johns Hopkins Joins Project To Build New Tools To Model Pandemic Spread

The Johns Hopkins University professor behind the popular COVID-19 tracking map is joining scientists at two other institutions to develop new methods for understanding how and why the current coronavirus and future pandemics spread.

Life on the Rocks Helps Scientists Understand How to Survive in Extreme Environments

By studying how the tiniest organisms in the Atacama Desert of Chile, one of the driest places on Earth, extract water from rocks, researchers at the Johns Hopkins University, University of California, Irvine, and U.C. Riverside revealed how, against all odds, life can exist in extreme environments. 

ADVISORY: Experts Available to Discuss Improving Rapid Detection of Pandemics

Scientists developing a rapid system for tackling outbreaks of avian influenza at their origins in Thailand are available to discuss their project and how it could potentially help improve responses to other pandemic threats such as coronavirus.

Sounds of Mosquito Mating Rituals Could Lead to Quieter Drones, Nontoxic Pest Control

Mosquitoes flap their wings not just to stay aloft but for two other critical purposes: to generate sound and to point that buzz in the direction of a potential mate, researchers at Johns Hopkins University have discovered. Their findings about the aerodynamics of mosquito wings could have implications for building quieter drones and for devising nontoxic methods to trap and exterminate the pests.

Buttons and Flies Help Hopkins Solve Longtime DNA Mystery

Biologists at Johns Hopkins University have uncovered an important clue in the longtime mystery of how long strands of DNA fold up to squeeze into microscopic cells, with each pair of chromosomes aligned to ensure perfect development.

A Snapshot in Time: Study Captures Fleeting Cell Differences That Can Alter Disease Risk

In cinema and science fiction, one small change in the past can have major, sometimes life-changing effects in the future. Using a series of snapshots, researchers recently captured such so-called “butterfly effects” in heart muscle cell development, and say this new view into the sequence of gene expression activity may lead to better understanding disease risk.

Study: Treats Might Mask Animal Intelligence

Rewards are necessary for learning, but may actually mask true knowledge, finds a new Johns Hopkins University study with rodents and ferrets.

Rats in Augmented Reality Help Show How the Brain Determines Location

February 11, 2019 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Chanapa Tantibanchachai Office: 443-997-5056 / Cell: 928-458-9656 chanapa@jhu.edu @JHUmediareps Before the age of GPS, humans had to orient themselves without on-screen arrows pointing down an exact street, but rather, by memorizing landmarks and using learned relationships among time, speed and distance. They had to know, for instance, that […]

MEDIA ADVISORY: JHU Expert Available on Implications of 3-Parent Baby

A 32-year-old Greek woman is reportedly pregnant from an experimental reproductive technique that uses DNA from three people, the result of the first known clinical trial to use the controversial procedure to treat infertility. 

Jeffrey Kahn, director of Johns Hopkins University’s Berman Institute of Bioethics, who chaired a 2016 U.S. National Academy of Sciences panel that examined the science and ethical issues raised by the three-parent procedure, is available to discuss the implications of this new pregnancy and the procedure, known as mitochondrial replacement therapy, which is banned in the United States.

Insight Into Swimming Fish Could Lead to Robotics Advances

The constant movement of fish that seems random is actually precisely deployed to provide them at any moment with the best sensory feedback they need any to navigate the world, Johns Hopkins University researchers found.

Gambling Monkeys Help Scientists Find Brain Area Linked to High-Risk Behavior

Monkeys who learned how to gamble have helped researchers pinpoint an area of the brain key to one’s willingness to make risky decisions.

Smartphone ‘Scores’ Can Help Doctors Track Severity of Parkinson’s Disease Symptoms

Parkinson’s disease, a progressive brain disorder, is often tough to treat effectively because symptoms, such as tremors and walking difficulties, can vary dramatically over a period of days, or even hours. To address this challenge, Johns Hopkins University computer scientists, working with an interdisciplinary team of experts from two other institutions, have developed a new approach that uses sensors on a smartphone to generate a score that reliably reflects symptom severity in patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Can a Cockroach Teach a Robot How to Scurry Across Rugged Terrain?

When they turn up in family pantries or restaurant kitchens, cockroaches are commonly despised as ugly, unhealthy pests and are quickly killed. But in the name of science, Johns Hopkins researchers have put these unwanted bugs to work.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Super Bowl Marks the Season’s End, But Concussion Concerns Continue

During this year’s Super Bowl, K.T. Ramesh, a biomechanics expert at Johns Hopkins University, will pay more attention to the collateral damage that can occur during football games: head injuries. He is developing a technological tool to help better diagnose concussions and predict where related brain damage has likely occurred.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Probe Mystery of Spider Web-Spinning

Johns Hopkins University biologist Andrew Gordus is conducting a leg-by-leg analysis of a spider building its web in hopes of unlocking secrets of behavior: how is it shaped by genetics, how is it a response to surroundings? Gordus says the project could eventually shed light on higher animals.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Explain Rudolph, Grinch, Scrooge

This festive season, Johns Hopkins University researchers dug deep into their reserves of scientific expertise to explain how these unexplainable plot lines in holiday classics like Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer, The Grinch That Stole Christmas, and A Christmas Carol just might be (almost) (possibly) possible.