About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Breaking Up is Hard to Do: Asteroids are Stronger, Harder to Destroy Than Previously Thought

A popular theme in the movies is that of an incoming asteroid that could extinguish life on the planet, and our heroes are launched into space to blow it up. But incoming asteroids may be harder to break than scientists previously thought, finds a Johns Hopkins study that used a new understanding of rock fracture and a new computer modeling method to simulate asteroid collisions.

Shedding Light—Literally—on Resistance to Radiation Therapy

A new Johns Hopkins study offers promise towards someday being able to non-invasively examine changes in cancerous tumors to determine whether they’ll respond to radiation treatment, before treatment even begins.

More Flexible Nanomaterials Can Make Fuel Cell Cars Cheaper

A new method of increasing the reactivity of ultrathin nanosheets, just a few atoms thick, can someday make fuel cells for hydrogen cars cheaper, finds a new Johns Hopkins study.

Johns Hopkins Exceeds Investment Goals for Build, Hire, Buy in Baltimore

Johns Hopkins University and Health System announced today that the institution has surpassed its three-year goals for hiring, purchasing and construction contracting.

Extreme Makeover: Blue Jay Edition

The Johns Hopkins Blue Jay mascot debuted a new look during a dramatic reveal today at halftime of the men’s lacrosse home opener. With a nod to Hopkins’ excellence in the fields of science and health, “Jay’s” makeover reflects his efforts to improve his personal fitness while also exhibiting more scientifically and anatomically correct attributes for his species.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins to Unveil New, Improved Blue Jay Mascot

The Johns Hopkins University’s Blue Jay mascot will debut a new look during a dramatic reveal Saturday at halftime of the men’s lacrosse home opener. With a nod to Hopkins’ excellence in the fields of science and health, “Jay’s” makeover reflects his efforts to improve his personal fitness while also exhibiting more scientifically and anatomically correct attributes for his species.

Astrophysicist Brice Ménard receives President’s Frontier Award

Many astronomy researchers benefit from sky surveys containing millions of stars and galaxies observed by telescopes. But Brice Ménard’s colleagues say his imagination and insight make him particularly adept at discovering the universal secrets hidden in a daunting amount of data. Ménard, an astrophysicist and associate professor at Johns Hopkins University, has received this year’s $250,000 President’s Frontier Award to support his exploration of astronomical data.

Dangerous School Commutes Lead to Student Absenteeism

The more crime that occurs along a student’s way to school, the higher the likelihood that student will be absent, Johns Hopkins University researchers found.

Longtime Federal Policy Expert Joins JHU

Cybele Bjorklund, a longtime federal health policy leader, has been appointed vice president for federal strategy, a new position for Johns Hopkins University and Medicine. She joins the university March 1 and will be based in Washington, D.C.

Rats in Augmented Reality Help Show How the Brain Determines Location

February 11, 2019 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Chanapa Tantibanchachai Office: 443-997-5056 / Cell: 928-458-9656 chanapa@jhu.edu @JHUmediareps Before the age of GPS, humans had to orient themselves without on-screen arrows pointing down an exact street, but rather, by memorizing landmarks and using learned relationships among time, speed and distance. They had to know, for instance, that […]

Foreign Affairs Symposium Features Grassroots Activists

A diverse array of activists is slated to visit Johns Hopkins University this semester as part of the annual student-run Foreign Affairs Symposium. This year’s theme is “Disrupt.”

Media Advisory: Hundreds of College Students to Gather at Johns Hopkins for Weekend Hackathon

February 11, 2019 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Shani McPherson Office: 410-516-4778 Cell: 510-393-7159 sprovos1@jhu.edu WHAT: More than 300 graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University this weekend for the latest HopHacks, a marathon session challenging students to realize their best software and hardware ideas and compete for cash […]

JHU Scientists Find New Science Instrument on Mars Curiosity Rover

The Curiosity Rover may have been ambling around the Gale Crater on Mars for nearly seven years but a group at Johns Hopkins University has just found a way to use it for something new: making the first surface gravity measurements on a planet other than Earth.

China’s Regulations Unsuccessful in Curbing Methane Emissions

China, already the world’s leading emitter of human-caused greenhouse gases, continues to pump increasing amounts of climate-changing methane into the atmosphere despite tough new regulations on gas releases from its coal mines, a new Johns Hopkins study shows.

New Johns Hopkins Homewood Museum Tour to Highlight Truths of Slavery

Beginning Feb. 1, the Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood Museum will replace its traditional guided tour with one that gives equal focus to two enslaved families, the Conners and the Rosses, who supported Homewood’s original family, Charles and Harriet Carroll. All tours will be free in February.

Johns Hopkins University to Acquire 555 Pennsylvania Ave., Create a Consolidated “Hopkins D.C.” Facility

The Johns Hopkins University’s statement regarding the agreement reached between the university and the Freedom Forum, the creator and principal funder of the Newseum.

MEDIA ADVISORY: JHU Expert Available on Implications of 3-Parent Baby

A 32-year-old Greek woman is reportedly pregnant from an experimental reproductive technique that uses DNA from three people, the result of the first known clinical trial to use the controversial procedure to treat infertility. 

Jeffrey Kahn, director of Johns Hopkins University’s Berman Institute of Bioethics, who chaired a 2016 U.S. National Academy of Sciences panel that examined the science and ethical issues raised by the three-parent procedure, is available to discuss the implications of this new pregnancy and the procedure, known as mitochondrial replacement therapy, which is banned in the United States.

Divided Nation, United States: Navigating Today’s Partisan Waters

The Johns Hopkins University Stavros Niarchos Foundation Agora Institute will sponsor a PBS NewsHour event Divided Nation, United States, to try to uncover how these governors work with their legislatures, relate to their constituents, and define success.

Demi Lovato’s Overdose Causes Surge in Media, but Few Mentions of Lifesaving Hotline

Demi Lovato’s drug overdose and Anthony Bourdain’s suicide resulted in unequal news coverage of national help hotlines, finds a new study published Jan. 14 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

MEDIA ADVISORY: 300 Baltimore City Public Schools Students to Compete in Robotics Contest at JHU

More than 300 elementary, middle, and high school Baltimore City Public Schools students will compete Saturday in the Hopkins Robotics Cup, the Baltimore City VEX and VEX IQ Robotics League championship event.

How the Brain Decides Whether to Hold ’Em or Fold ’Em

Johns Hopkins study sheds light on brain basis of risk-taking behavior January 7, 2019 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Chanapa Tantibanchachai Office: 443-997-9009/ Cell: 928-458-9656 chanapa@jhu.edu @JHUmediareps Picture yourself at a Las Vegas poker table, holding a bad hand – one with a very low chance of winning. Even so, the sight of the large stack […]

JHU to Host Science Internships for Minorities, Students Lacking Access to Advanced Research

The Johns Hopkins University has been awarded more than $600,000 to offer summer research experiences for undergraduates from backgrounds underrepresented in science and whose own colleges and universities offer limited chances to work on original research.

ADVISORY: Graveside Commemoration on Christmas Eve Marks 145th Anniversary Of Johns Hopkins’ Death

Johns Hopkins employees, alumni, students and friends will attend the annual Christmas Eve graveside observance honoring the founder of the university and health system, Mr. Johns Hopkins. This year’s event marks the 145th anniversary of Mr. Hopkins’ death.

What Looks Like Substance Abuse Could be Self-Medication, Study Finds

When improved antidepressants hit the market in the 1980s, heavy drinking among people with depression dropped 22 percent, suggesting people who knowingly use drugs and alcohol to relieve mental and physical pain will switch to safer, better treatment options when they can get them, a new Johns Hopkins University study found.

Johns Hopkins Tops U.S. Universities in Research Spending for 39th Consecutive Year

Johns Hopkins University led all U.S. universities in research and development spending for the 39th straight year in fiscal year 2017, spending a record $2.562 billion on projects like enhancing drone safety, growing retinas in the lab to find out how color vision is developed, and improving methods of studying cell mechanics to advance cancer research.