About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Announces 2019 Honorary Degree Recipients

A Canadian Supreme Court justice, a Johns Hopkins University board of trustees chair, an acclaimed economist, The Atlantic’s editor-in-chief, a former commander of the United States Strategic Command, a renowned geneticist, and the ad exec who created Meatless Mondays will receive Johns Hopkins honorary degrees this year.

Centers for Civic Impact Launches at Johns Hopkins

The Centers for Civic Impact, an effort to help public organizations thoughtfully and masterfully use data and research to better understand and improve public life, has launched at Johns Hopkins University.

Study: Millennials Arrested More Often Than Their Predecessors—Even When Fewer Crimes Are Committed

Millennials are more likely to be arrested than their predecessor counterparts regardless of self-reported criminal activity, finds a new study by a Johns Hopkins University expert. Furthermore, black men who self-reported no offenses were 419% more likely to be arrested at the beginning of the 21st century than non-offending blacks of the previous generation, and 31.5% more likely to be arrested than whites of the same generation who did not self-report any crimes.

New Hubble Measurements Confirm Universe Is Outpacing All Expectations of its Expansion Rate

April 25, 2019 CONTACT: Chanapa Tantibanchachai Office: 443-997-5056 / Cell: 928-458-9656 chanapa@jhu.edu @JHUmediareps New measurements from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope confirm that the Universe is expanding about 9% faster than expected based on its trajectory seen shortly after the big bang, astronomers say. The new measurements, accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal, reduce the chances […]

Media Advisory: JHU Students Build 17-Hole Miniature Golf Course

Freshmen mechanical engineering students at the Johns Hopkins University have built an interactive 17-hole miniature golf course for 2019 JHU Spring Fair guests to enjoy. Working in teams of three or four, the students have created 17 holes that make up a lively golf course—each hole has moving parts, sensors and lights. Come see the course for yourself and try your hand at a round or two.

Johns Hopkins Announces Major Solar Power Commitment

In the largest commitment to solar energy in Maryland and one of the most significant pledges to greenhouse gas reduction in higher education, Johns Hopkins University has entered into a long-term agreement to supply its campuses with more than 250,000 megawatt hours of solar power per year.

Mikulski statement on the death of Michael E. Busch

Retired U.S. Senator Barbara A. Mikulski (D-MD), who is now a professor of public policy at Johns Hopkins University, today issues the following statement remembering Maryland House of Delegates Speaker Michael E. Busch:

JHU’s Stavros Niarchos Foundation Agora Institute Announces Inaugural Director

A political scientist who dedicated her career to understanding civic and political participation will now work to advance them as inaugural director of the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Agora Institute at Johns Hopkins University. She starts July 1.

At JHU, Students Can Now Swap Old-Fashioned Campus IDs for iPhone

Johns Hopkins University students will no longer need a campus identification card to get into their dorms, pay for pizza or do laundry. Starting this week, a flash of their iPhone or Apple Watch will handle all of that and more as the university becomes the fifth in the country to offer students the option to add their campus ID to Apple Wallet.

Atlantic Editor-in-Chief to Give Commencement Address

Journalist Jeffrey Goldberg, editor-in-chief of The Atlantic, will speak at the Johns Hopkins University’s commencement ceremony on Thursday May 23.

JHU Mind Games: Researchers Get Humans to Think Like Computers

Computers, like those that power self-driving cars, can be tricked into mistaking random scribbles for trains, fences and even school busses. People aren’t supposed to be able to see how those images trip up computers but in a new study, Johns Hopkins University researchers show most people actually can.

Evergreen Museum & Library Names New Director/Curator

Lori Beth Finkelstein has been appointed the new Philip Franklin Wagley Director and Curator of Evergreen Museum & Library. She will begin on March 18.

Johns Hopkins Grad Programs Rank Among Nation’s Best

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in public health, nursing and medicine are once again among the country’s very best, according to the annual U.S. News & World Report ranking of the nation’s “Best Graduate Schools.”

Politicians, Journalists, Scholars Meet in Baltimore to Discuss State of Democracy

Can liberal democracy endure? Reawakening the Spirit of Democracy will address this question head-on. Co-hosted by the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Agora Institute at Johns Hopkins University and the Renew Democracy Initiative, this conference will convene global thought leaders from across the political spectrum who will debate threats to democracy and propose strategies to reinvigorate it.

Media Advisory: Cyber Security Conference at Johns Hopkins University Features Experts from Academia and Industry

The 5th Annual Cyber Security Conference for Executives, co-sponsored by Johns Hopkins University and business advisory and expert services firm Ankura, presents a forum for experts from academia, private business, and government to share their knowledge and experience.

Singing for Science: How the Arts Can Help Students Who Struggle Most

Incorporating the arts—rapping, dancing, drawing—into science lessons can help low-achieving students retain more knowledge and possibly help students of all ability levels be more creative in their learning, finds a new study by Johns Hopkins University.

Breaking Up is Hard to Do: Asteroids are Stronger, Harder to Destroy Than Previously Thought

A popular theme in the movies is that of an incoming asteroid that could extinguish life on the planet, and our heroes are launched into space to blow it up. But incoming asteroids may be harder to break than scientists previously thought, finds a Johns Hopkins study that used a new understanding of rock fracture and a new computer modeling method to simulate asteroid collisions.

Shedding Light—Literally—on Resistance to Radiation Therapy

A new Johns Hopkins study offers promise towards someday being able to non-invasively examine changes in cancerous tumors to determine whether they’ll respond to radiation treatment, before treatment even begins.

More Flexible Nanomaterials Can Make Fuel Cell Cars Cheaper

A new method of increasing the reactivity of ultrathin nanosheets, just a few atoms thick, can someday make fuel cells for hydrogen cars cheaper, finds a new Johns Hopkins study.

Johns Hopkins Exceeds Investment Goals for Build, Hire, Buy in Baltimore

Johns Hopkins University and Health System announced today that the institution has surpassed its three-year goals for hiring, purchasing and construction contracting.

Extreme Makeover: Blue Jay Edition

The Johns Hopkins Blue Jay mascot debuted a new look during a dramatic reveal today at halftime of the men’s lacrosse home opener. With a nod to Hopkins’ excellence in the fields of science and health, “Jay’s” makeover reflects his efforts to improve his personal fitness while also exhibiting more scientifically and anatomically correct attributes for his species.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins to Unveil New, Improved Blue Jay Mascot

The Johns Hopkins University’s Blue Jay mascot will debut a new look during a dramatic reveal Saturday at halftime of the men’s lacrosse home opener. With a nod to Hopkins’ excellence in the fields of science and health, “Jay’s” makeover reflects his efforts to improve his personal fitness while also exhibiting more scientifically and anatomically correct attributes for his species.

Astrophysicist Brice Ménard receives President’s Frontier Award

Many astronomy researchers benefit from sky surveys containing millions of stars and galaxies observed by telescopes. But Brice Ménard’s colleagues say his imagination and insight make him particularly adept at discovering the universal secrets hidden in a daunting amount of data. Ménard, an astrophysicist and associate professor at Johns Hopkins University, has received this year’s $250,000 President’s Frontier Award to support his exploration of astronomical data.

Dangerous School Commutes Lead to Student Absenteeism

The more crime that occurs along a student’s way to school, the higher the likelihood that student will be absent, Johns Hopkins University researchers found.

Longtime Federal Policy Expert Joins JHU

Cybele Bjorklund, a longtime federal health policy leader, has been appointed vice president for federal strategy, a new position for Johns Hopkins University and Medicine. She joins the university March 1 and will be based in Washington, D.C.