About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Protein Appears to Prevent Tumor Cells from Spreading Via Blood Vessels

Researchers have identified a specialized protein that appears to help prevent tumor cells from entering the bloodstream and spreading to other parts of the body.

Cancer Tissue-Freezing Approach May Help More Breast Cancer Patients in Lower Income Countries

A new reusable device created by the Johns Hopkins University can help women with breast cancer in lower income countries by using carbon dioxide, a widely available and affordable gas, to power a cancer tissue-freezing probe instead of industry-standard argon.

Shedding Light—Literally—on Resistance to Radiation Therapy

A new Johns Hopkins study offers promise towards someday being able to non-invasively examine changes in cancerous tumors to determine whether they’ll respond to radiation treatment, before treatment even begins.

Research Reveals Cancer Pathway to Spreading Through the Body

Cancer cells need oxygen to survive, as do most other life forms, but scientists had never tracked their search for oxygen in their early growth stages until now — a step toward deeper understanding of one way cancer spreads that could help treat the disease.

Johns Hopkins Biologist Leads Research Shedding Light On Stem Cells

A Johns Hopkins University biologist has led a research team reporting progress in understanding the mysterious shape-shifting ways of stem cells, which have vast potential for medical research and disease treatment.

Hopkins scientists’ findings could shed light on cancer, aging

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have found molecular evidence of how a biochemical process controls the lengths of protective chromosome tips, a potentially significant step in ultimately understanding cancer growth and aging.

Science News Tips from Johns Hopkins

Science news tips for reporters, including a story suggestion from Johns Hopkins Magazine on JHU and ET and another on mistletoe and cancer.

Collecting Cancer Data in the ‘Cloud’ Could Lead to More Effective Treatment

Storing music and photos on distant computers via “cloud” technology is nothing new. But Johns Hopkins researchers are now using this tactic to collect detailed information from thousands of cancer cell samples. The goal is to help doctors make better predictions about how a patient’s illness will progress and what type of treatment will be most effective.

Collagen-Seeking Synthetic Protein Could Lead Doctors to Tumor Locations

Johns Hopkins researchers have created a synthetic protein that, when activated by ultraviolet light, can guide doctors to places within the body where cancer, arthritis and other serious medical disorders can be detected. The technique could lead to a new type of diagnostic imaging technology and may someday serve as a way to move medications to parts of the body where signs of disease have been found.

Seven Johns Hopkins Researchers Named AAAS Fellows

Seven Johns Hopkins researchers from four of the university’s schools have been elected by their peers as fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Pierre A. Coulombe, Ph.D., and Marcelo Jacobs-Lorena, Ph.D, of the Bloomberg School of Public Health; David Draper, Ph.D., of the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences; David J. Linden, Ph.D., and Cynthia Wolberger, Ph.D., of the School of Medicine; and Peter C. Searson, Ph.D., and Denis Wirtz, Ph.D. of the Whiting School of Engineering; are among 531 new fellows around the world. Election as a fellow honors their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.