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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Bug Appetit: Why Eating Cicadas is Good for the Environment

Trillions of cicadas are poised to get their buzz on across much of the United States, with the once-every-17-year emergence of Brood X. Hope you’re hungry!

One person’s infestation is another’s free eco-friendly lunch, according to Johns Hopkins University sustainable food expert Jessica Fanzo, author of the forthcoming Can Fixing Dinner Fix the Planet?

Fanzo, who plans to collect and eat cicadas herself as soon as they hit her own backyard, can explain how the insects have as much protein as red or other factory-farmed meat, but without the harsh environmental effects, including greenhouse gases and biodiversity loss.

What Spurs People to Save the Planet? Stories or Facts?

With climate change looming, what must people hear to convince them to change their ways to stop harming the environment? A new Johns Hopkins University study finds stories to be significantly more motivating than scientific facts— at least for some people.

Johns Hopkins Launches Institute Focused on Creating Clean, Renewable Energy Technologies

With a $20 million gift from the estate of trustee emeritus and alumnus Ralph S. O’Connor, the Johns Hopkins University and its Whiting School of Engineering today announced the establishment of the Ralph S. O’Connor Sustainable Energy Institute (ROSEI) to serve as the university’s interdisciplinary home for ongoing research and education aimed at creating clean, renewable, and sustainable energy technologies.

China’s Regulations Unsuccessful in Curbing Methane Emissions

China, already the world’s leading emitter of human-caused greenhouse gases, continues to pump increasing amounts of climate-changing methane into the atmosphere despite tough new regulations on gas releases from its coal mines, a new Johns Hopkins study shows.

Flaw Found in Water Treatment Methods

Some potentially toxic chemicals in water may be created, ironically, during the water treatment process itself.

Science and Health News Tips from Johns Hopkins

These news tips come from stories in the winter issue of Johns Hopkins Magazine.

Environmentalist Winona LaDuke to Speak at Johns Hopkins

The next event in the JHU Forums on Race in America will feature environmentalist Winona LaDuke.

JHU Researchers Make New Discovery About 3-D Shape Processing in the Brain

While previous studies of the brain suggest that processing of objects and places occur in very different locations, a Johns Hopkins University research team has found they are closely related.

‘Large, Dirty’ Companies Get Greener as Way to Earn More Green, Says Carey Business School Researcher

Refuting their image as careless polluters, “large and dirty” industrial firms are recognizing that it makes economic sense to adopt eco-friendly strategies, says a Johns Hopkins University business professor who has co-authored a paper on the topic.