About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

The Richer You are, The More Likely You’ll Social Distance, Study Finds

The higher a person’s income, the more likely they were to protect themselves at the early stages of the Covid-19 pandemic in the United States, Johns Hopkins University economists find.

When it comes to adopting behaviors including social distancing and mask wearing, the team detected a striking link to their financial well-being. People who made around $230,000 a year were as much as 54% more likely to increase these types of self-protective behaviors compared to people making about $13,000.

Poor Families Must Move Often, But Rarely Escape Concentrated Poverty

Unforeseen circumstances force low-income families to quickly move from one home to the next, a process that helps to perpetuate racial and economic segregation in the United States, research shows.

With Just One Black Teacher, Black Students More Likely to Graduate

Low-income black students who have at least one black teacher in elementary school are significantly more likely to graduate high school and consider attending college, concludes a new study co-authored by a Johns Hopkins University economist.

Teens in Poorest Families Go Hungry More Than Younger Kids

In very poor families, teenagers are going hungry twice as often as their younger siblings, a new Johns Hopkins University study finds.

U.S. Welfare Spending Up — But Help for the Neediest Down

Although the United States is spending more on welfare than ever before, most of that money is going to better-off families rather than the very poorest. That means in 2014, a family of four earning $11,925 a year likely got less aid than a same-sized family earning $47,700.

JHU Course Uses “The Wire” As Lens On Urban Issues

Though it’s located in Baltimore, Johns Hopkins University’s verdant and well-manicured Homewood campus seems a world away from the gritty drug corners and public housing projects that form the backdrop for the groundbreaking, critically acclaimed five-season HBO drama “The Wire.” But inside a classroom in Hodson Hall, a group of undergraduates is immersing itself in that other world, thanks to a new public health studies course called “Baltimore and ‘The Wire’: A Focus on Major Urban Issues.” Created and taught by former Baltimore City Health Commissioner Peter Beilenson – currently Howard County health officer – the class uses the fictional but highly realistic world of the former TV series as a lens through which to view issues confronting not only Baltimore, but also other major American urban centers, from Detroit to Philadelphia to Los Angeles.