About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Adam Riess of Johns Hopkins Accepts 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics

Adam Riess, a professor in physics and astronomy at The Johns Hopkins University and a research scientist at the Space Telescope Science Institute, today accepted the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences during a ceremony in Stockholm, Sweden.

Johns Hopkins Carey Business School and the Maryland Institute College of Art Announce Partnership to Launch M.B.A./M.A. Program Focused on Innovative Thinking

The Johns Hopkins Carey Business School and the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) announce a partnership to launch the M.B.A./M.A. in Design Leadership, focusing on the integration of creative thinking into all aspects of organizational management and development.

It Takes Two: Brains Come Wired for Cooperation, JHU Neuroscientist Asserts

When legal commentator Nancy Grace and her partner danced a lively rumba to Spandau Ballet’s 1980’s hit, “True,” on a recent “Dancing With the Stars,” more was going on in the legal commentator’s brain than concern over a possible wardrobe malfunction. Deep in Grace’s cortex, millions of neurons were hard at work doing what they apparently had been built to do: act and react to partner Tristan MacManus’s movements to create a pas de deux that had the dancers functioning together (for the most part) like a well-oiled machine. That is because the brain was built for cooperative activity, whether it be dancing on a reality television show, constructing a skyscraper or working in an office, according to a study led by Johns Hopkins behavioral neuroscientist Eric Fortune and published in the November 4 issue of the journal Science.

Johns Hopkins Astronomer Wins 2011 Balzan Prize

Johns Hopkins University astronomer Joseph Silk has been awarded the 2011 Balzan Prize, for his pioneering work on the infant universe. The $950,000 award is given annually to people or organizations that have made outstanding achievements in the fields of the natural sciences, humanities and culture, as well as for peace-promoting endeavors.

Vive la Difference: Retinal Cells Thought to Be the Same Are Not, JHU Biologist Says

The old adage “Looks can be deceiving” certainly rings true when it comes to people. But it is also accurate when describing special, light-sensing cells in the eye, according to a Johns Hopkins University biologist. In a study recently published in Nature, a team led by Samer Hattar of the Department of Biology at the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and Tudor Badea at the National Eye Institute found that these cells, which were thought to be identical and responsible for both setting the body’s circadian rhythm and the pupil’s reaction to light and darkness, are actually two different cells, each responsible for one of those tasks.

Renowned Theoretical Physicist Marc Kamionkowski Joins Johns Hopkins Faculty

Marc Kamionkowski, considered one of the world’s leading theoretical physicists for his work in large-scale structures and the early history of the universe, will join the faculty in the Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy at The Johns Hopkins University’s Krieger School of Arts and Sciences on July 1. An endowed professor at California Institute of Technology, Kamionkowski has spent much of his career researching astrophysics, cosmology and elementary particle theory.

Astrophysicist Adam Riess Wins the 2011 Einstein Medal

Adam Riess, an astrophysicist at The Johns Hopkins University and the Space Telescope Science Institute, today was awarded the Einstein Medal 2011 by the Albert Einstein Society of Bern, Switzerland. The society board of trustees recognized Riess for leadership in the High-z Supernova Search Team’s 1998 discovery that the expansion rate of the universe is accelerating, a phenomenon widely attributed to a mysterious, unexplained “dark energy” filling the universe. Riess, 41, shares this year’s prize with Saul Perlmutter, an astrophysicist at the University of California, Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, whose Supernova Cosmology Project team published similar results shortly after those published by Riess and High-z teammate Brian Schmidt, of the Australian National University.

$2.2 million will help physicist explore exotic materials

N. Peter Armitage of the Institute for Quantum Matter and the Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy at the Johns Hopkins University’s Krieger School of Arts and Sciences has received a $2.2 million grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to invent and develop new optical techniques and instruments to explore the characteristics of complex condensed matter such as superconductors, electronic gases and quantum magnets.

Johns Hopkins garners more than $260 million in stimulus grants

Before the program ended on September 30, Johns Hopkins received $260 million in National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation research grants through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, also known as the federal stimulus act or ARRA.

Owen Phillips, World Renowned Johns Hopkins Oceanographer, Dies at 79

Owen Martin Phillips, a Johns Hopkins University faculty member emeritus and world-renowned oceanographer, died on Wednesday, Oct. 13 at his Chestertown, Md., home. He was 79. An engineer and scientist who probed the complex physics of fluids in motion, Phillips spent half a century at Johns Hopkins and was the chief architect of the school’s Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, formed in 1967. His work in fluid mechanics is widely recognized as having had a profound impact on the field, cutting across traditional disciplines and encompassing practical applications as disparate as the Earth’s crust, its atmosphere and oceans.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Students Help City Nonprofits Become More “Eco-Friendly”

In an effort to engage a new and promising audience in Baltimore City’s greening efforts, six Johns Hopkins University students will be visiting three Baltimore City nonprofits this week to help assess their sustainability and to advise them on how to save their organizations money on energy and other resources. A collaboration between the university and Baltimore City, this “Climate Showcase Project” – which was launched in June — strives to help nonprofits become more eco-friendly, while educating students on both sustainability measures and the vital role that these socially focused organizations play in the community.

Johns Hopkins Hits $200 Million Mark in Recovery Act Grants

The Johns Hopkins University has to date been awarded more than $200 million in National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation research grants through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, also known as the federal stimulus package. The 424 grants are financing investigations ranging from how the universe began to how men and women differ in their responses to the influenza virus to new strategies to prevent muscle loss caused by diseases such as muscular dystrophy. The grants also have underwritten the creation of 164 staff jobs, 32 of which are still open.