About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

New Method Can Pinpoint Cracks In Metal Long Before They Cause Catastrophes

When metallic components in airplanes, bridges and other structures crack, the results are often catastrophic. But Johns Hopkins University researchers have found a way to reliably predict the vulnerabilities earlier than current tests. In a paper published today in Science, Johns Hopkins University researchers detail a new method for testing metals at a microscopic scale that allows them to rapidly inflict repetitive loads on materials while recording how ensuing damage evolves into cracks.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Hopkins Professor Available To Discuss California Power Outages, Electrical Grid Management and Renewable Energy

Benjamin Hobbs, a Johns Hopkins University professor of environmental health and engineering, is available to speak to the media about issues related to the California energy grid and a new effort to build more renewable energy into power markets over the next decade.

Johns Hopkins Engineers Developing 3D-printed Ventilator Splitter

In response to a pressing need for more ventilators to treat critically ill COVID-19 patients, a team led by Johns Hopkins University engineers is developing and prototyping a 3D-printed splitter that will allow a single ventilator to treat multiple patients. Though medical professionals have expressed concerns about the safety and effectiveness of sharing ventilators, the team has designed this tool to address those concerns.

Cancer Tissue-Freezing Approach May Help More Breast Cancer Patients in Lower Income Countries

A new reusable device created by the Johns Hopkins University can help women with breast cancer in lower income countries by using carbon dioxide, a widely available and affordable gas, to power a cancer tissue-freezing probe instead of industry-standard argon.

A Snapshot in Time: Study Captures Fleeting Cell Differences That Can Alter Disease Risk

In cinema and science fiction, one small change in the past can have major, sometimes life-changing effects in the future. Using a series of snapshots, researchers recently captured such so-called “butterfly effects” in heart muscle cell development, and say this new view into the sequence of gene expression activity may lead to better understanding disease risk.

Media Advisory: JHU Students Build 17-Hole Miniature Golf Course

Freshmen mechanical engineering students at the Johns Hopkins University have built an interactive 17-hole miniature golf course for 2019 JHU Spring Fair guests to enjoy. Working in teams of three or four, the students have created 17 holes that make up a lively golf course—each hole has moving parts, sensors and lights. Come see the course for yourself and try your hand at a round or two.

Media Advisory: Cyber Security Conference at Johns Hopkins University Features Experts from Academia and Industry

The 5th Annual Cyber Security Conference for Executives, co-sponsored by Johns Hopkins University and business advisory and expert services firm Ankura, presents a forum for experts from academia, private business, and government to share their knowledge and experience.

Breaking Up is Hard to Do: Asteroids are Stronger, Harder to Destroy Than Previously Thought

A popular theme in the movies is that of an incoming asteroid that could extinguish life on the planet, and our heroes are launched into space to blow it up. But incoming asteroids may be harder to break than scientists previously thought, finds a Johns Hopkins study that used a new understanding of rock fracture and a new computer modeling method to simulate asteroid collisions.

Shedding Light—Literally—on Resistance to Radiation Therapy

A new Johns Hopkins study offers promise towards someday being able to non-invasively examine changes in cancerous tumors to determine whether they’ll respond to radiation treatment, before treatment even begins.

Media Advisory: Hundreds of College Students to Gather at Johns Hopkins for Weekend Hackathon

February 11, 2019 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Shani McPherson Office: 410-516-4778 Cell: 510-393-7159 sprovos1@jhu.edu WHAT: More than 300 graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University this weekend for the latest HopHacks, a marathon session challenging students to realize their best software and hardware ideas and compete for cash […]

Demi Lovato’s Overdose Causes Surge in Media, but Few Mentions of Lifesaving Hotline

Demi Lovato’s drug overdose and Anthony Bourdain’s suicide resulted in unequal news coverage of national help hotlines, finds a new study published Jan. 14 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

MEDIA ADVISORY: 300 Baltimore City Public Schools Students to Compete in Robotics Contest at JHU

More than 300 elementary, middle, and high school Baltimore City Public Schools students will compete Saturday in the Hopkins Robotics Cup, the Baltimore City VEX and VEX IQ Robotics League championship event.

JHU collaborates with Morgan, Coppin to promote STEM diversity

With $2.46 million in support from the National Institutes of Health, the Johns Hopkins University is teaming up with two historically black Baltimore institutions, Morgan State and Coppin State universities, to cultivate a diverse group of highly trained biomedical researchers.

New Johns Hopkins Doctor of Engineering Program Designed for Working Professionals

Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering has created a doctoral engineering program to serve the needs of working engineering professionals and to meet the growing demand for engineers who have the advanced knowledge needed to solve challenging problems.

Keeping it cool: The Parker Solar Probe’s high-performance heat shield

Media advisory: Background for reporters on the heat shield that will protect NASA’s Parker Solar Probe as it swoops through the solar atmosphere, less than 4 million miles from the surface of the sun.

Johns Hopkins University Leads New Research Partnership

Johns Hopkins University has been awarded up to $30 million to lead a consortium of three Mid-Atlantic universities that will work together on research projects with the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Johns Hopkins-Taiwan Team Up in Cross-Cultural Doctoral Program

A new partnership between the Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering and Taiwan’s Ministry of Education will bring students from that country to Johns Hopkins’ Homewood campus to pursue doctoral studies in engineering beginning in August 2019.

Students Devise One-Size-Fits-All Blood-Clotting Tool

Engineering undergraduates have developed an anti-bleeding “super gel” that can be delivered with a catheter but is hyper-absorbent enough to then swell with blood, creating a clot to block any bleeding.

University Buys Baltimore’s Landmark Stieff Silver Site

The Johns Hopkins University today bought Baltimore’s historic Stieff Silver complex, making a highly visible symbol of the city’s manufacturing heritage formally a part of its future in the knowledge economy.

Materials Scientists Probe Protein’s Role in Speeding Ebola Spread

Two Johns Hopkins materials science graduate students and their professors played a key role in a multi-institution research project that pinpointed how a tiny protein seems to make the deadly Ebola virus particularly contagious.

Nine Johns Hopkins Engineers Named AIMBE Fellows

Nine faculty members from The Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering have been named Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

Johns Hopkins Graduate Programs Rank Among U.S. News Best

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in nursing, education, medicine, and biomedical engineering are considered among the best in the country, according to the newest U.S. News & World Report rankings of “Best Graduate Schools.”

$15 Million Establishes Clark Scholars Program

The Clark Charitable Foundation is giving the Johns Hopkins University $15 million to provide financial aid and enhanced learning opportunities for undergraduate engineering students.

ADVISORY: Future Engineers Use Their Noodles to Build Spaghetti Bridges

About 160 high school students at the Johns Hopkins Baltimore campus — and another 425 students across the country — will compete in the annual Spaghetti Bridge Contest, marking the culmination of a four-week summer course called Engineering Innovation.

Undergrad Tuition to Rise 3.5 Percent, Aid 5 Percent

Tuition for full-time liberal arts and engineering undergraduates at the Johns Hopkins University will increase 3.5 percent this fall while the financial aid budget supporting those students rises 5 percent.