About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Cyber Security Experts to Discuss Attack Defense, Response

How do hackers crack a computer system and steal data? How should organizations protect themselves? How should they prepare for and respond to attack? These are among the questions that will be addressed by experts in the field at the third annual Senior Executive Cyber Security Conference to be held Wednesday, Sept. 21 at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

Students Seek to Reduce Deaths From Battlefield Injuries That Block Breathing

When a battlefield explosion injures a soldier’s face or neck, the critical air passage between the head and lungs often becomes blocked, which can lead to brain damage and death within minutes. To help treat such injuries, a Johns Hopkins undergraduate team has designed a low-cost, low-tech device dubbed CricSpike that may boost the success rate when combat medics need to create an artificial airway and pump air into the lungs.

The Brain’s Super-Sensitivity to Curbs

Humans rely on boundaries like walls and curbs for navigation, and Johns Hopkins University researchers have pinpointed the areas of the brain most sensitive to even the tiniest borders.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Experts Available to Discuss Election Topics

The following Johns Hopkins University experts, whose research focuses on such subjects as race, economic policy, inequality, gun violence, law enforcement and health care, are available for interviews during the presidential election season.

ADVISORY: Future Engineers Use Their Noodles to Build Spaghetti Bridges

About 160 high school students at the Johns Hopkins Baltimore campus — and another 425 students across the country — will compete in the annual Spaghetti Bridge Contest, marking the culmination of a four-week summer course called Engineering Innovation.

Protein Found to Bolster Growth of Damaged Muscle Tissue

Johns Hopkins University biologists have found that a protein that plays a key role in the lives of stem cells can bolster the growth of damaged muscle tissue, a step that could potentially contribute to treatments for muscle degeneration caused by old age and diseases such as muscular dystrophy.

Sunil Kumar Named Johns Hopkins Provost

Sunil Kumar, dean of the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and a widely published expert on operations management and research, has been appointed the 15th provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at the Johns Hopkins University.

Income Inequality Leads Millennials to Start Families Before Marriage

Rising income inequality, and the resulting scarcity of certain types of jobs, is a key reason a growing number of young Americans are having babies before getting married.

What Free Will Looks Like in the Brain

Johns Hopkins University researchers are the first to glimpse the human brain making a purely voluntary decision to act.

Johns Hopkins Trustees Extend Ronald J. Daniels’ Presidency by Five Years

The Johns Hopkins University Board of Trustees has appointed Ronald J. Daniels to an additional five years as president, extending his tenure as leader of the institution through June 30, 2024.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Lead Effort to Protect Vital Networks

Johns Hopkins University computer scientists have led an effort to create a proven way to prevent sabotage from disrupting electronic networks supporting major infrastructure such as power grids and the electronic cloud.

Novel Controller Allows Video Gamer Who Lacks Hands to Compete With His Feet

It’s tough to play video games when you have no fingers to push buttons on the controller. Just ask Gyorgy (George) Levay, an avid gamer who lost both hands to a meningitis infection five years ago. But Levay and two fellow Johns Hopkins grad students have devised a clever way get him, and others with similar disabilities, back in the game.

Johns Hopkins Students Design Ebola Protection Suit Improvements

Two Johns Hopkins mechanical engineering teams have developed improvements for a protective suit for health workers treating people stricken with Ebola and other infectious diseases, including prototypes for a more comfortable hood and face mask that make breathing easier, and for a battery-powered system that curbs humidity in the suit.

How a Woman With Amnesia Defies Conventional Wisdom About Memory

Johns Hopkins University cognitive scientists say the sharp contrasts in the memory profile of a patient with severe amnesia — her inability to remember facts about pursuits once vital to her life as an artist, musician and amateur aviator, while clearly remembering facts relevant to performing in these domains — suggest conventional wisdom about how the brain stores knowledge is incorrect.

Did Gravitational Wave Detector Find Dark Matter?

When an astronomical observatory in the United States this winter detected a whisper of two black holes colliding in deep space, scientists celebrated a successful effort to confirm Albert Einstein’s prediction of gravitational waves. A team of Johns Hopkins University astrophysicists wondered about something else: Had the experiment found the “dark matter” that makes up most of the mass of the universe?

A Simple Numbers Game Seems to Make Kids Better at Math

Although math skills are considered notoriously hard to improve, Johns Hopkins University researchers boosted kindergarteners’ arithmetic performance simply by exercising their intuitive number sense with a quick computer game.

Johns Hopkins Team Makes Hobby Drones Crash to Expose Design Flaws

Sales of drones—small flying machines equipped with cameras—are soaring. But new research by a Johns Hopkins computer security team has raised concerns about how easily hackers could cause these robotic devices to ignore their human controllers and land or, more drastically, crash.

Universe Expanding Faster Than Scientists Predicted

The universe appears to be expanding faster now than predicted by measurements of the rate as seen shortly after the Big Bang, a study led by a Johns Hopkins University scientist has found.

Researchers Find What Could Be Brain’s Trigger for Binge Behavior

Rats that responded to cues for sugar with the speed and excitement of binge-eaters were less motivated for the treat when certain neurons were suppressed, researchers discovered.

Johns Hopkins Students Design Prosthetic Fit for High Heels

After losing a leg to injury or disease, women adjusting to life with a prosthetic limb face the same challenges as men, with perhaps one added complication: how to wear high-heels? A team of Johns Hopkins University students, working with a Johns Hopkins physician and outside prosthetics experts, has developed an early version of a potential solution.

Posting Zika Conspiracy Theories on Social Media Could Put People at Risk

Social media posters who share unfounded conspiracy theories and pseudoscientific claims about the Zika virus may undermine upcoming efforts to keep the disease from spreading, according to a study published online today by the journal Vaccine.

BLocal Announces BUILD College Training Program

To bolster small construction businesses in Baltimore, the companies of BLocal have developed a series of free classes for local minority- and woman-owned firms.

Telescope Peering into Origins of the Universe Receives “First Light”

High in the Andes Mountains of northern Chile a unique Johns Hopkins University observatory has just achieved “first light,” the first time the telescope has collected radiation from space.

19 Awarded Fulbrights at Johns Hopkins

A record number of Johns Hopkins University students and recent graduates – 19 – have been named Fulbright Scholars, earning the opportunity to travel abroad to such places as Peru, Malaysia and Spain to study, teach and conduct research.

Johns Hopkins Commencement Set for May 18

About 1,500 students will claim their degrees Wednesday, May 18, at the commencement ceremony for all of Johns Hopkins University’s divisions and campuses.