About Johns Hopkins
Johns Hopkins University

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Announces Fall Speaker Series

An adventurer, the on-screen son of a meth dealer and a former North Korean detainee are among the speakers who will visit Johns Hopkins University this fall as part of the annual MSE Symposium.

Johns Hopkins Mathematician Receives NSF Grant for Innovative Brain Research

Carey Priebe, a noted mathematician in Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering, has been awarded a National Science Foundation EAGER grant for his work exploring the complex behaviors of the brain’s circuitry.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Move-in Day for Class of 2018

A flying trapeze artist. The winner of Delaware’s Young Playwrights Festival three years running. A competitor on “The Biggest Loser” who’s now dedicated to fighting obesity. The creator of an app for cancer patients. A professional skateboarder who writes a food blog. The teacher of a free robotics course for special needs students.

These dynamic students are among Johns Hopkins University’s incoming freshman class who will be moving onto campus this week.

Message from President Daniels on Alcohol Issues

Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels today updated students, faculty, and staff on the recently released results of a survey about drinking on the campuses of nine Maryland colleges and universities and outlined the initial steps the university will take to address this “serious and urgent matter.”

New Milky Way Maps Help Solve Stubborn Interstellar Material Mystery

An international team of sky scholars, including a key researcher from Johns Hopkins, has produced new maps of the material located between the stars in the Milky Way. The results should move astronomers closer to cracking a stardust puzzle that has vexed them for nearly a century.

Johns Hopkins Museums Fall Highlights

Johns Hopkins University Museums September – November 2014 exhibition and programming highlights.

Message from President Daniels on Sexual Violence Issues

Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels updated students, faculty and staff on progress on university initiatives against sexual violence and on confirmation received by the university of a complaint filed with the U.S. Education Department. This is the text of his email message.

Google’s ATAP and Johns Hopkins University Team Up in Tech Development Pact

The Johns Hopkins University has entered into a partnership agreement with Google’s Advanced Technology and Projects (ATAP) group, aimed at speeding up the development of new technology and moving the resulting products toward the marketplace more quickly. The agreement, approved recently by both parties, will enable ATAP to draw on the expertise of Johns Hopkins computer scientists and other experts, and approve funds for joint technology projects in as little as 30 days. That turnaround time is much shorter than the period usually required for obtaining grants from governments agencies and private organizations.

Johns Hopkins Researcher Finds People Born Blind Perceive Sight Similar to Those With Vision

With the use of verbal stories, a researcher from Johns Hopkins University has found that the brains of people born blind respond to situations similarly to the way people with sight do.

Physicist Who Probes the Origin of the Universe Wins Prestigious Simons Award

Marc Kamionkowski, a Johns Hopkins professor who is developing theories to explain how the universe was formed, is one of six physicists who have been selected to receive a 2014 Simons Foundation Investigator award, which will provide up to $1 million to support his work.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Future Engineers Use Their Noodles to Build Bridges from Spaghetti

About 120 high school students from 11 nations and 18 states will compete in Johns Hopkins University’s annual, tension-filled Spaghetti Bridge Contest, marking the culmination of a four-week summer engineering program.

Exploring the Archaeology of Reading

Sheridan Libraries of JHU Partner with Princeton Library and University College London on Mellon-Funded Project FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE July 10, 2014 MEDIA CONTACT: Brian Shields 410-516-8337/443-631-2890 bshields@jhu.edu The Johns Hopkins University’s Sheridan Libraries, in partnership with University College London’s Centre for Editing Lives and Letters (CELL), and the Princeton University Library, have been awarded a [...]

Injectable Foam Could Prevent Fatal Blood Loss in Wounded Soldiers

Without prompt care, a badly wounded soldier can easily bleed to death while being transported to a distant medical station. Two traditional treatments—tourniquets and medicated gauze pads—often cannot stop the blood loss from a deep wound at the neck, shoulder or groin. To give these soldiers a fighting chance at survival, Johns Hopkins undergraduates have invented an injectable foam system designed to stop profuse bleeding from a wound where a limb or the head is connected to the torso.

JHU Museum July – August 2014 Exhibition & Programming Highlights

Celebrate the 214th wedding anniversary of Charles Carroll Jr. and Harriet Chew Carroll by savoring a traditional afternoon tea at their Federal era country house, Homewood.

19th Century Math Tactic Gets a Makeover—and Yields Answers Up to 200 Times Faster

A relic from long before the age of supercomputers, the 169-year-old math strategy called the Jacobi iterative method is widely dismissed today as too slow to be useful. But thanks to a curious, numbers-savvy Johns Hopkins engineering student and his professor, it may soon get a new lease on life.

Two Johns Hopkins Researchers Receive Pew Charitable Trusts Awards

Robert J. Johnston, a biologist at The Johns Hopkins University, studying how cells randomly choose their fates during development and Andrew J. Holland, a molecular biologist at the university’s School of Medicine, whose work focuses on how dividing cells create the correct number of centrosomes, have been named Pew scholars for their promising work in the area of health sciences.

Most Millennial Moms Who Skip College Also Skip Marriage

Waiting until marriage to have babies is now “unusual” among less educated adults close to 30 years old, Johns Hopkins University researchers found.

Johns Hopkins Joins NSF’s National Innovation Network

The Johns Hopkins University is joining the University of Maryland, George Washington University and Virginia Tech in a regional collaboration called Innovation Corps, designed to train faculty and student researchers to transform ideas into products and get them on the market..

Johns Hopkins Appoints Three to Bloomberg Distinguished Professorship Positions

The new appointees are Patricia H. Janak, a neuroscientist specializing in associative learning and addiction; Stephen Morgan, a sociologist with expertise in education and inequality; and Kathleen Sutcliffe, an organizational sociologist focused on organizational reliability and safety. Janak, Morgan, and Sutcliffe will begin their new roles on July 1.

NSF Selects Johns Hopkins’ Langmead for Early CAREER Award

Benjamin Langmead, assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science at Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering, has been chosen by the National Science Foundation to receive its prestigious CAREER Award, which recognizes the high level of promise and excellence in early-stage scholars.

Affordable Housing Linked to Children’s Intellectual Ability

It’s long been accepted – with little science to back it up – that people should spend roughly a third of their income on housing. It turns out, that’s about how much a low-income family should spend to optimize their children’s brainpower.

Students’ Heart-Shocking ‘Shirt’ May Save Lives When Paramedics Are Not Nearby

Johns Hopkins biomedical engineering students have designed a lightweight, easy-to-conceal shirt-like garment to deliver life-saving shocks to patients experiencing serious heart problems. The students say their design improves upon a wearable defibrillator system that is already in use. Their design changes, the students say, should help persuade patients at risk for sudden cardiac arrest to wear the system around the clock.

How the ‘Long Shadow’ of an Inner City Childhood Affects Adult Success

In a ground-breaking study, Johns Hopkins University researchers followed nearly 800 Baltimore school children for a quarter of a century, and discovered that their fates were substantially determined by the family they were born into.

Johns Hopkins Engineer Wins 2014 EUROMECH Fluid Mechanics Prize

Johns Hopkins University Professor Andrea Prosperetti, an authority in the area of fluid dynamics and underwater acoustics, has been awarded the 2014 EUROMECH Fluid Mechanics Prize by the Council of the European Mechanics Society.

Johns Hopkins Opens Doors with New Online Master of Engineering Management

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals, the division of the Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering that administers part-time graduate programs, has announced the launch of a new master’s degree in engineering management.

events calendar
click to view events calendar
browse Johns Hopkins A-Z
click to browse
on the web
  • click for hopkins on Facebook
  • click for hopkins on Twitter
  • click for hopkins on YouTube
  • click for hopkins music