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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Senior Named Rhodes Scholar

Johns Hopkins University senior Peter Kalugin has been named a Rhodes Scholar, one of the top awards available to American college students.

New Online 3-D Tool Seeks Possible Targets To Disable Ebola Virus

Johns Hopkins biomedical engineers have developed a free, browser-based online tool that could speed up the creation of new drugs to treat or prevent Ebola virus infections. The software, called MuPIT Ebola Edition, enables a researcher to visualize Ebola gene mutations in the context of three-dimensional protein structures. It also offers views of antibody binding sites called epitopes that are situated on protein surfaces. These sites may give researchers new targets for preventive vaccines and serums to treat those who are already infected.

Deep-Earth Carbon Offers Clues About Origin of Life on Earth

New findings by a Johns Hopkins University-led team reveal long unknown details about carbon deep beneath the Earth’s surface and suggest ways this subterranean carbon might have influenced the history of life on the planet.

Johns Hopkins University Neuroscientist to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award

 November 17, 2014 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Tracey Reeves Office: 443-997-9903 Cell: 443-986-4053 treeves@jhu.edu Michela Gallagher, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University, doesn’t just study the brain. She mentors young scientists on the importance and rewards of studying it too. Over the course of her career, Gallagher has spent almost as [...]

Johns Hopkins University Astrophysicist Shares $3 Million Breakthrough Prize

Adam Riess, a professor of physics and astronomy at Johns Hopkins University and a Nobel laureate, has been named a recipient of the Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics for the discovery of the acceleration of the universe. Riess received the award, the most lucrative academic prize in the world, at a ceremony in California on Sunday.

Viewing Cancer on the Move: New Device Yields Close-up Look at Metastasis

Johns Hopkins engineers have invented a lab device to give cancer researchers an unprecedented microscopic look at metastasis, the complex way that tumor cells spread through the body, causing more than 90 percent of cancer-related deaths. By shedding light on precisely how tumor cells travel, the device could uncover new ways to keep cancer in check.

The John Astin Theatre and the Johns Hopkins Theatre Arts and Studies Program Present ‘Dura Mater’

The John Astin Theatre and the Johns Hopkins University Theatre Arts and Studies Program will present John Pietrowski’s Dura Mater directed by James Glossman, opening Friday, Nov. 7.

Johns Hopkins Museums November to February Highlights

October 27, 2014 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Heather Egan Stalfort 410-516-0341, ext. 17 hestalfort@jhu.edu Making a Museum: The Peale Family in Early Baltimore On view December 4, 2014 through May 31, 2015 Location: Homewood Museum Cost: Included with paid museum admission and on view as part of the guided tour or $3 for the exhibition [...]

Big Black Holes Can Block New Stars

Massive black holes spewing out radio-frequency-emitting particles at near-light speed can block formation of new stars in aging galaxies, a study has found.

Stavros Niarchos Foundation Gives $5M for Film Center

The Stavros Niarchos Foundation has committed $5 million to Johns Hopkins, enabling the university, the Maryland Institute College of Art and the Maryland Film Festival to transform Baltimore’s historic Parkway Theater into a center for the study, production and exhibition of film.

Forum Highlights Recruitment Opportunities and Challenges for Attracting More Women in Technology

A panel that included women in leadership positions at a top technology company – Bloomberg LP – convened at Johns Hopkins University this week to address the ongoing need to support talented young women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Ebola Experts Available

The following Johns Hopkins University faculty members are available for perspective on the Ebola crisis.

Johns Hopkins Astrophysicist Receives Prestigious Packard Fellowship

Johns Hopkins astrophysicist Brice Ménard has been awarded a 2014 David and Lucile Packard Foundation Fellowship for Science and Engineering. Ménard plans to use this fellowship to work on a new technique to estimate the distance of galaxies and then explore new directions of research.

Charles Village Mixed-Use Project Could be Under Way by April

Market-rate student apartments combined with retail space, restaurants and parking could be under construction by spring on Johns Hopkins University property at St. Paul and 33rd streets in Baltimore’s Charles Village neighborhood.

Leaky, Star-Forming Galaxies Lead Johns Hopkins Researchers to Better Understand the Universe

By focusing on large, star-forming galaxies in the universe, researchers at Johns Hopkins University were able to measure its radiation leaks in an effort to better understand how the universe evolved as the first stars were formed.

Johns Hopkins Community Unites to Help Baltimore Organizations

Painting Baltimore’s animal shelter, weeding city flowerbeds, planting native grasses for the National Aquarium and removing trash from the Stoney Run Stream Valley. These are just a few tasks more than 1,000 Johns Hopkins University students, faculty and staff will pursue on Saturday, Oct. 11, to help dozens of Baltimore’s non-profit organizations.

Johns Hopkins Engineering Doctoral Students Named 2015 Siebel Scholars

Five Johns Hopkins graduate students, recently named to the 2015 class of Siebel Scholars, are each pursuing important research projects in varied bioengineering topics involving promising health-related applications.

Exhibit Explores Art and Artifice Behind History’s Greatest Fabrications

The 70 items on display at the George Peabody Library explore the phenomenon of forgery as a creative, as well as destructive literary form, and illustrate the tricks of the forger’s trade—and some of its most disastrous consequences—through materials that range from biblical and Greco-Roman antiquity up to the early decades of the 20th century.

Daniels Stresses JHU Commitment to Eliminate Sexual Violence, Announces New Measures

Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels today announced a series of initiatives in conjunction with the university’s release of campus crime statistics for 2013.

Johns Hopkins to Co-Host Cyber Security Conference for Top Business Executives

At a time when data theft at retailers and other businesses is occurring far too frequently, Johns Hopkins information security experts have helped organize an upcoming conference to inform top executives about the growing risks of digital break-ins, how to reduce these risks, and how to manage the aftermath of a data breach. The conference is scheduled for Oct. 31 and Nov. 1 at the university’s Homewood campus in Baltimore. More than a dozen speakers, representing the business community, academia and government offices, are slated to participate.

Can Three-Year Degrees Solve College Cost Crisis?

College costs are soaring beyond the reach of average families. Student debt has skyrocketed. But a Johns Hopkins University analysis shows a solution to these mounting concerns could be as simple as making the typical degree a three-year pursuit.

JHU Researchers Make New Discovery About 3-D Shape Processing in the Brain

While previous studies of the brain suggest that processing of objects and places occur in very different locations, a Johns Hopkins University research team has found they are closely related.

When Rulers Can’t Understand the Ruled

Johns Hopkins University political scientists wanted to know if America’s unelected officials have enough in common with the people they govern to understand them. The answer: Not really.

JHU Researcher’s Use of Owls Provide Clues on How Humans Might Direct Attention

Imagine a quarterback on the gridiron getting ready to pass the ball to a receiver. Suddenly, in charges a growling linebacker aiming to take him down. At what point does the quarterback abandon the throw and trigger evasive maneuvers?

MEDIA ADVISORY: Robert Resnick Lecture

A physicist with path breaking research in materials science and in the development of quantitative models for biological systems will deliver the annual Robert Resnick Lecture at Johns Hopkins University.

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