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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Launches $15-Million Award Program to Enhance Faculty-Led Research

The Johns Hopkins University today announced two new award programs that together will provide an additional $15 million to advance innovative faculty-led research over the next three years. The expanded university funding is aimed at promising early-career scholars and at organizers of ambitious research projects proposed by teams that involve more than one Johns Hopkins division or affiliate.

Message to the University Community on the Death of a Student

The university sent a message on Monday, Jan. 26, to students, faculty members and staff members at the Homewood campus on the death of Jeremy Huber, a freshman in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. This is the text of that message.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Super Bowl Commercial Expert Available

A Johns Hopkins University researcher who has studied what makes a Super Bowl commercial successful is available to discuss, analyze and rate the 2015 ads.

Johns Hopkins Senior Wins Churchill Scholarship

Sandya Subramanian, a Johns Hopkins University senior from Grand Rapids, Mich., has won a scholarship from the Winston Churchill Foundation of the United States for graduate study at England’s University of Cambridge

Johns Hopkins Astrophysicist Shares 2015 Dannie Heineman Prize

Johns Hopkins University’s Marc Kamionkowski is a winner of the 2015 Dannie Heineman Prize for Astrophysics, one of the top prizes in the field, the American Astronomical Society (AAS) and the American Institute of Physics (AIP) announced today. The honor, which is awarded annually to outstanding mid-career scientists, carries a cash prize of $10,000 that will be split between Kamionkowski and his co-recipient, David Spergel of Princeton University.

O’Malley to Join Johns Hopkins as Visiting Professor

Outgoing Maryland governor Martin O’Malley will join the Johns Hopkins University’s Carey Business School Feb. 2 as a visiting professor focusing on government, business and urban issues.

Map of Mysterious Molecules In Our Galaxy Sheds New Light on Century-Old Puzzle

By analyzing the light of hundreds of thousands of celestial objects, Johns Hopkins astronomers from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) have created a unique map of enigmatic molecules in our galaxy that are responsible for puzzling features in the light from stars.The map, which can be viewed at http://is.gd/dibmap , was unveiled Jan. 8 at the 225th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Seattle. “Seeing where these mysterious molecules are located is fascinating,” said Brice Ménard, a professor in the Department of Physics & Astronomy at The Johns Hopkins University.

“New” San Martin Drive to be Safer, Even Better

Johns Hopkins is launching a yearlong $15 million project to improve San Martin Drive, the scenic tree-lined road that winds around the back of the university’s Homewood campus in north Baltimore.

Science at Risk as Young Researchers Increasingly Denied Research Grants

America’s youngest scientists, increasingly losing research dollars, are leaving the academic biomedical workforce, a brain drain that poses grave risks for the future of science, according to an article published this week by Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels.

A Document from University History: The Baltimore American’s Coverage of the Death of Mr. Johns Hopkins

For those who attended the annual Green Mount Cemetery observance, here is coverage of the Dec. 24, 1873, death of Mr. Johns Hopkins, founder of the university and hospital that bear his name, from one of the local newspapers of the time, The Baltimore American and Commercial Advertiser.

‘Particle Fever’ Wins Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award in Journalism

David E. Kaplan, a Johns Hopkins professor, theoretical particle physicist and documentary producer, received the 2015 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award in Journalism for his contributions to the production of Particle Fever. Particle Fever was one of 14 journalistic works to receive the prestigious award in 2015.

Science News Tips from Johns Hopkins

Science news tips for reporters, including a story suggestion from Johns Hopkins Magazine on JHU and ET and another on mistletoe and cancer.

Christmas Eve: Graveside Commemoration of Mr. Johns Hopkins on 141st Anniversary of His Death

Media Advisory: Members of the Johns Hopkins community are invited to an annual graveside observance honoring their founder, Mr. Johns Hopkins. This year’s brief ceremony will take place at his grave in Green Mount Cemetery in Baltimore at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 24, the 141st anniversary of his death.

How Climate Change Could Leave Cities in the Dark

Cities like Miami are all too familiar with hurricane-related power outages. But a Johns Hopkins University analysis finds climate change will give other major metro areas a lot to worry about in the future.

Improved Suit for Ebola Caregivers Selected for Funding in Federal Competition

An advanced protective suit for health care workers who treat Ebola patients, devised by a Johns Hopkins team, is one of the first five awardees in a federal funding contest aimed at quickly devising new tools to combat the deadly disease. The Johns Hopkins prototype is designed to do a better job than current garments in keeping health care workers from coming in contact with Ebola patients’ contagious body fluids, both during treatment and while removing a soiled suit.

Johns Hopkins Welcomes 1st Members of Class Of 2019

A record number of high school students applied early decision to the Johns Hopkins University this fall, identifying it as their top choice and committing to attend if admitted.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Traumatic Brain Injury Expert Available to Discuss the Mechanics of Concussion in Light of Lacrosse Helmet Recall

The recent decertification of two popular lacrosse helmets, the Warrior Regulator and the Cascade Model R, is causing concern for those involved in men’s lacrosse, one of the nation’s fastest-growing sports. The decertification by the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment comes at a time of growing worries about concussions in athletes. At Johns Hopkins, engineers working at the forefront of traumatic brain injury research have created a novel “digital head” that is helping explain why some physical movements of the brain cause severe damage while others do not.

Twitter Posts May Shine a Fresh Light on Mental Illness Trends

Johns Hopkins computers scientists, who have already used Twitter posts to track flu cases, say their techniques also show promise as a tool to gather important information about some common mental illnesses. By reviewing tweets from users who publicly mentioned their diagnosis and by looking for language cues linked to certain disorders, the researchers say, they’ve been able to quickly and inexpensively collect new data on post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, bipolar disorder and seasonal affective disorder.

Message from President Daniels on Sexual Violence

President Ronald J. Daniels on Dec. 4 sent a message to students, faculty members and staff members at the university’s Homewood campus, commenting on sexual violence issues. This statement, a follow-up to previous messages on these issues, comes in the wake of the arrest by Baltimore police of two suspects in a sexual assault at an early November off-campus fraternity party.

MEDIA ADVISORY: No Batteries, No Motors in This Barrier Battle Cart Contest

Seventy-five Johns Hopkins freshmen from an introductory mechanical engineering course will compete in this event. Twenty-six teams of two or three students have built devices that must be able to move along the floor and then launch a small projectile over a six-foot-tall barrier and strike a target. For a class project, each team designed a device powered only by mousetraps and rubber bands—no motors, no batteries.

Johns Hopkins Senior Named Rhodes Scholar

Johns Hopkins University senior Peter Kalugin has been named a Rhodes Scholar, one of the top awards available to American college students.

New Online 3-D Tool Seeks Possible Targets To Disable Ebola Virus

Johns Hopkins biomedical engineers have developed a free, browser-based online tool that could speed up the creation of new drugs to treat or prevent Ebola virus infections. The software, called MuPIT Ebola Edition, enables a researcher to visualize Ebola gene mutations in the context of three-dimensional protein structures. It also offers views of antibody binding sites called epitopes that are situated on protein surfaces. These sites may give researchers new targets for preventive vaccines and serums to treat those who are already infected.

Deep-Earth Carbon Offers Clues About Origin of Life on Earth

New findings by a Johns Hopkins University-led team reveal long unknown details about carbon deep beneath the Earth’s surface and suggest ways this subterranean carbon might have influenced the history of life on the planet.

Johns Hopkins University Neuroscientist to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award

 November 17, 2014 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Tracey Reeves Office: 443-997-9903 Cell: 443-986-4053 treeves@jhu.edu Michela Gallagher, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University, doesn’t just study the brain. She mentors young scientists on the importance and rewards of studying it too. Over the course of her career, Gallagher has spent almost as [...]

Johns Hopkins University Astrophysicist Shares $3 Million Breakthrough Prize

Adam Riess, a professor of physics and astronomy at Johns Hopkins University and a Nobel laureate, has been named a recipient of the Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics for the discovery of the acceleration of the universe. Riess received the award, the most lucrative academic prize in the world, at a ceremony in California on Sunday.

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