About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Retired Sen. Barbara Mikulski to Join University Faculty

Barbara A. Mikulski, the longest-serving woman in the history of Congress and Maryland’s longest-tenured U.S. senator, will join the Johns Hopkins University on Jan. 16 as a professor of public policy and presidential adviser.

Captured on Video: DNA Nanotubes Build a Bridge Between Two Molecular Posts

In a microscopic feat that resembled a high-wire circus act, Johns Hopkins researchers have coaxed DNA nanotubes to assemble themselves into bridge-like structures arched between two molecular landmarks on the surface of a lab dish. The team captured examples of this unusual nanoscale performance on video.

ADVISORY: Christmas Eve observance at grave of Johns Hopkins

Johns Hopkins employees, alumni, students and friends will attend the annual Christmas Eve graveside observance honoring the founder of the university and health system, Mr. Johns Hopkins.

New Bioinformatics Tool Tests Methods for Finding Mutant Genes That ‘Drive’ Cancer

Among the numerous new tactics that aim to spotlight the so-called cancer driver genes, which produce the most accurate results? To help solve this puzzle, a team of Johns Hopkins computational scientists and cancer experts have devised their own bioinformatics software to evaluate how well the current strategies identify cancer-promoting mutations and distinguish them from benign mutations in cancer cells.

Johns Hopkins Welcomes 1st Members of Class of 2021

A talented pool of high school students applied early decision this fall to the Johns Hopkins University, identifying it as their top choice and committing to attend if admitted.

Johns Hopkins Joins Alliance to Expand College Access For 50,000 Talented Lower-income Students

The Johns Hopkins University is joining 29 other colleges and universities to expand by at least 50,000 the number of talented low- and moderate-income students at the U.S. undergraduate institutions with the highest graduation rates.

ADVISORY: Portraits of Black Civil War Soldiers Exhibit Opens With Visit From One Soldier’s Granddaughter and Captain’s Great-grandson

Dec. 7, 2016 CONTACT: Jill Rosen Office: 443-997-9906 Cell: 443-547-8805 jrosen@jhu.edu @JHUmediareps WHAT: Seventeen Men: Portraits of Black Civil War Soldiers, portrays the faces of 17 African-American soldiers, including one from Baltimore, who served under Captain William A. Prickitt, who recorded the faces of each man in a miniature photo album. Artist Shayne Davidson researched […]

Johns Hopkins Leads U.S. Universities in Research Spending 37th Straight Time

The Johns Hopkins University led U.S. universities in research and development spending for the 37th straight year in fiscal 2015, putting a record $2.306 billion into projects to cure disease, promote human health, advance technology and expand knowledge of the universe and ourselves.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Students Will Use Mousetrap and Rubber Band Power to Launch Blue Jay Beanie Babies

Johns Hopkins Freshman Engineering Contest Allows No Batteries or Other Electronics
WHEN: 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 7.

WHERE: On stage in the Shriver Hall Auditorium on The Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, Md.

Is Your Favorite Ballplayer Hitting When It Matters, or Just Padding His Stats?

In time for Major League Baseball’s Winter Meetings this week, a team of computer scientists from Johns Hopkins University is adding to the ocean of baseball statistics with what appears to be the first analysis of hitters’ performance when their team is either just about guaranteed to win, or hopelessly behind. In a 54-page unpublished paper consisting mostly of statistics, the three authors call this the “Meaningless Game Situation.”

Exotic Insulator May Hold Clue to Key Mystery of Modern Physics

Experiments using laser light and pieces of gray material the size of fingernail clippings may offer clues to a fundamental scientific riddle: what is the relationship between the everyday world of classical physics and the hidden quantum realm that obeys entirely different rules?

Johns Hopkins Graduate Named Schwarzman Scholar

Johns Hopkins University graduate Oladotun “Dotun” Opasina has been named a Schwarzman Scholar, the first from the university to win the newly established award.

Subsidized Housing Works Better for Some Kids Than Others

Living in subsidized housing seems to give a boost to children with high standardized test scores and few behavior problems, but it has the opposite effect on students who score poorly and have behavioral issues, a new study finds.

Johns Hopkins Senior Named Rhodes Scholar

Johns Hopkins University senior Nicole A. Mihelson has been named a Rhodes Scholar, one of the top awards available to American college students.

ADVISORY: Bernie Sanders to Speak at Johns Hopkins

Bernie Sanders, a U.S. senator and former Democratic presidential candidate, to speak at Johns Hopkins University.

Research Shows Nerve Growth Protein Controls Blood Sugar

Research led by a Johns Hopkins University biologist demonstrates the workings of a biochemical pathway that helps control glucose in the bloodstream, a development that could potentially lead to treatments for diabetes.

ADVISORY: Dance Marathon Saturday at Johns Hopkins

About 150 Johns Hopkins students are expected to dance all night to raise money to help sick and injured children. Money raised will help support a weekend child life specialist at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center.

When Fish Come to School, Kids Get Hooked on Science

A program that brings live fish into classrooms to teach the fundamentals of biology not only helps students learn, but improves their attitudes about science, a new study finds.

Mouse Tests Aim to Show How Genes and Environment Join Forces to Cause Disease

When researchers try to uncover the cause of disease, they commonly start with two questions: Did a quirk in the patient’s genes open the door to illness? Did exposure to environmental factors play havoc with the patient’s health? Very often, both troublemakers are at least partly to blame. To provide the most effective treatment, doctors need to know as much as possible about how these partners in sickness and poor health work together.

Computing Tool Will Allow More Accurate Genome Sequencing

Scientists’ effort to piece together the genome is taking a significant step forward with a new computerized method that creates more complete and detailed versions of the complex puzzle of life than have ever been produced before.

Painter Catherine Kehoe to Speak at Johns Hopkins

Boston-based painter Catherine Kehoe will present slides and discuss her work on Thursday, October 27 at Johns Hopkins University.

$15 Million Establishes Clark Scholars Program

The Clark Charitable Foundation is giving the Johns Hopkins University $15 million to provide financial aid and enhanced learning opportunities for undergraduate engineering students.

ADVISORY: Marilyn Mosby to Speak at Johns Hopkins

Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby, who took office in 2015, and is best known for charging six police officers involved in the arrest of Freddie Gray, will speak at a program called “Unpacking Baltimore with Marilyn Mosby.”

Multi-Million-Dollar Research Effort Aims to Cripple Cancer’s Deadly Ability to Spread

Supported by a $9-million grant from the National Cancer Institute, a diverse team led by Johns Hopkins researchers has begun looking for new ways to attack one of the scariest traits of this disease: its frequent refusal to stay in one place.

Klag to End 12-Year Run as Dean of Public Health

Michael J. Klag, dean of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health since 2005, a 32-year member of the university community and a world expert on the epidemiology of major chronic diseases, will step down as dean next year and return to research and teaching.