About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

MEDIA ADVISORY: Lights Out! Weak Networks Put Power Grids at Risk

The startling vulnerability of the world’s power grid systems does not surprise Yair Amir, a professor and chair of the Department of Computer Science in the Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Researchers to Present Their Work on Capitol Hill

Early career scientists, physicians, engineers and specialists in public health, nursing, music and marketing from Johns Hopkins University will gather on Capitol Hill in Washington to present their federally-funded research, emphasizing the importance of continuing federal support in the pursuit of new knowledge and innovation.

New Cellular Target May Put the Brakes on Cancer’s Ability to Spread

A team led by Johns Hopkins researchers has discovered a biochemical signaling process that causes densely packed cancer cells to break away from a tumor and spread the disease elsewhere in the body.

Media Advisory: Robots Play Soccer, Catch and Chess at Johns Hopkins

The Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering is staging a demonstration by students who have programmed robots and drones to perform an array of tasks, including playing chess with a real chess board and passing around a soccer ball.

Whose Line is it Anyway? New Hopkins Class Teaches Engineers to Think on Their Feet

Offered for the first time this semester, “Improvisation for Scientists and Engineers” uses lessons borrowed from theater classes to help such students hone their off-the-cuff verbal skills and develop poise in front of groups – valued skills in the professional world.

Students Engineer Solutions for Baltimore Problems

See how Baltimore students would use science to help their neighborhoods – the capstone to a five-year pilot program for science, technology, engineering and math education

Johns Hopkins Engineering Students Customize Stroller for Syrian Child with Special Needs

In an effort to enhance his quality of life, undergraduate engineering students from Johns Hopkins University have customized a stroller for a local child with special needs, adding improvements that will make mobility simpler and safer for him and his family.

Nine Johns Hopkins Engineers Named AIMBE Fellows

Nine faculty members from The Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering have been named Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

Johns Hopkins Graduate Programs Rank Among U.S. News Best

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in nursing, education, medicine, and biomedical engineering are considered among the best in the country, according to the newest U.S. News & World Report rankings of “Best Graduate Schools.”

Voice Technology Education at Johns Hopkins Gets a Boost from Amazon

At a time when more home, office and vehicle devices respond to vocal commands, Amazon has selected Johns Hopkins University among the first four schools to receive support from the Alexa Fund Fellowship, a new program designed to encourage advances in voice communication between people and machines.

New Gene Sequencing Software Could Aid in Early Detection, Treatment of Cancer

A research team from the United States and Canada has developed and successfully tested new computational software that determines whether a human DNA sample includes an epigenetic add-on linked to cancer and other adverse health conditions.

Media Advisory: Hundreds of College Students to Convene at JHU for Weekend of HopHacks

Graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University for the latest HopHacks, a marathon session challenging students to realize their best software and hardware ideas and compete for cash and other sponsored prizes.

52 Baltimore City School Teams to Compete in Robotics Contest at Johns Hopkins

On Saturday, Feb. 4, more than 200 middle and high school students from Baltimore City Public Schools will compete in the Hopkins Robotics Cup, the Baltimore City VEX and VEX IQ Robotics League championship event. This engineering challenge, which changes every year, is presented in the form of a game.

Wanted: Self-Driving Cells to Pursue Deadly Bacteria

Drawing on their expertise in control systems and cell biology, Johns Hopkins University researchers are setting out to design and test troops of self-directed microscopic warriors that can locate and neutralize dangerous strains of bacteria.

City 6th Graders to Debut Underwater Robot Claws Designed for Johns Hopkins

Johns Hopkins mechanical engineering professor Louis Whitcomb, who specializes in underwater robotics, has challenged 6th graders to design a robotic “claw” able to grab and retrieve submerged objects. On Thursday, students will present and demo their designs before the professor and Johns Hopkins undergraduates who spent two weeks helping them create the claws from corrugated cardboard, straws, string, brass fasteners, tape, paper clips and rubber bands.

MEDIA ADVISORY: What Happens When Hackers Hijack Our Smart Devices?

In a recent segment on NPR’s TED Radio Hour, Johns Hopkins cybersecurity expert Avi Rubin warned that our increasing reliance on Internet-connected add-ons to our home appliances and vehicles could yield unwelcome consequences.

Captured on Video: DNA Nanotubes Build a Bridge Between Two Molecular Posts

In a microscopic feat that resembled a high-wire circus act, Johns Hopkins researchers have coaxed DNA nanotubes to assemble themselves into bridge-like structures arched between two molecular landmarks on the surface of a lab dish. The team captured examples of this unusual nanoscale performance on video.

New Bioinformatics Tool Tests Methods for Finding Mutant Genes That ‘Drive’ Cancer

Among the numerous new tactics that aim to spotlight the so-called cancer driver genes, which produce the most accurate results? To help solve this puzzle, a team of Johns Hopkins computational scientists and cancer experts have devised their own bioinformatics software to evaluate how well the current strategies identify cancer-promoting mutations and distinguish them from benign mutations in cancer cells.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Students Will Use Mousetrap and Rubber Band Power to Launch Blue Jay Beanie Babies

Johns Hopkins Freshman Engineering Contest Allows No Batteries or Other Electronics
WHEN: 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 7.

WHERE: On stage in the Shriver Hall Auditorium on The Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, Md.

Johns Hopkins Graduate Named Schwarzman Scholar

Johns Hopkins University graduate Oladotun “Dotun” Opasina has been named a Schwarzman Scholar, the first from the university to win the newly established award.

Mouse Tests Aim to Show How Genes and Environment Join Forces to Cause Disease

When researchers try to uncover the cause of disease, they commonly start with two questions: Did a quirk in the patient’s genes open the door to illness? Did exposure to environmental factors play havoc with the patient’s health? Very often, both troublemakers are at least partly to blame. To provide the most effective treatment, doctors need to know as much as possible about how these partners in sickness and poor health work together.

Computing Tool Will Allow More Accurate Genome Sequencing

Scientists’ effort to piece together the genome is taking a significant step forward with a new computerized method that creates more complete and detailed versions of the complex puzzle of life than have ever been produced before.

$15 Million Establishes Clark Scholars Program

The Clark Charitable Foundation is giving the Johns Hopkins University $15 million to provide financial aid and enhanced learning opportunities for undergraduate engineering students.

Multi-Million-Dollar Research Effort Aims to Cripple Cancer’s Deadly Ability to Spread

Supported by a $9-million grant from the National Cancer Institute, a diverse team led by Johns Hopkins researchers has begun looking for new ways to attack one of the scariest traits of this disease: its frequent refusal to stay in one place.

Light Tames Lethal Heart Disorders in Mice and Virtual Humans

Using high-tech human heart models and mouse experiments, scientists at Johns Hopkins and Germany’s University of Bonn have shown that beams of light could replace electric shocks in patients reeling from a deadly heart rhythm disorder. The findings, published online Sept. 12 in the October 2016 edition of The Journal of Clinical Investigation, could pave the way for a new type of implantable defibrillators.