About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Light Tames Lethal Heart Disorders in Mice and Virtual Humans

Using high-tech human heart models and mouse experiments, scientists at Johns Hopkins and Germany’s University of Bonn have shown that beams of light could replace electric shocks in patients reeling from a deadly heart rhythm disorder. The findings, published online Sept. 12 in the October 2016 edition of The Journal of Clinical Investigation, could pave the way for a new type of implantable defibrillators.

Online Master’s Degree in Data Science Now Offered at Johns Hopkins

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals, the division of Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering that offers online and part-time graduate programs, has launched a new master’s degree program in data science that students can complete online.

MIT Technology Review Honors Johns Hopkins Engineer as a Top Young Innovator

Muyinatu A. Lediju Bell, a Johns Hopkins engineering professor who designs medical imaging systems that link light, sound and robotics to produce clearer pictures, was honored today by MIT Technology Review, which placed her on its prestigious 2016 list of 35 Innovators Under 35. The list annually spotlights the nation’s most promising young scientists.

Students Seek to Reduce Deaths From Battlefield Injuries That Block Breathing

When a battlefield explosion injures a soldier’s face or neck, the critical air passage between the head and lungs often becomes blocked, which can lead to brain damage and death within minutes. To help treat such injuries, a Johns Hopkins undergraduate team has designed a low-cost, low-tech device dubbed CricSpike that may boost the success rate when combat medics need to create an artificial airway and pump air into the lungs.

ADVISORY: Future Engineers Use Their Noodles to Build Spaghetti Bridges

About 160 high school students at the Johns Hopkins Baltimore campus — and another 425 students across the country — will compete in the annual Spaghetti Bridge Contest, marking the culmination of a four-week summer course called Engineering Innovation.

Sunil Kumar Named Johns Hopkins Provost

Sunil Kumar, dean of the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and a widely published expert on operations management and research, has been appointed the 15th provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at the Johns Hopkins University.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Lead Effort to Protect Vital Networks

Johns Hopkins University computer scientists have led an effort to create a proven way to prevent sabotage from disrupting electronic networks supporting major infrastructure such as power grids and the electronic cloud.

Novel Controller Allows Video Gamer Who Lacks Hands to Compete With His Feet

It’s tough to play video games when you have no fingers to push buttons on the controller. Just ask Gyorgy (George) Levay, an avid gamer who lost both hands to a meningitis infection five years ago. But Levay and two fellow Johns Hopkins grad students have devised a clever way get him, and others with similar disabilities, back in the game.

Johns Hopkins Students Design Ebola Protection Suit Improvements

Two Johns Hopkins mechanical engineering teams have developed improvements for a protective suit for health workers treating people stricken with Ebola and other infectious diseases, including prototypes for a more comfortable hood and face mask that make breathing easier, and for a battery-powered system that curbs humidity in the suit.

Johns Hopkins Team Makes Hobby Drones Crash to Expose Design Flaws

Sales of drones—small flying machines equipped with cameras—are soaring. But new research by a Johns Hopkins computer security team has raised concerns about how easily hackers could cause these robotic devices to ignore their human controllers and land or, more drastically, crash.

Johns Hopkins Students Design Prosthetic Fit for High Heels

After losing a leg to injury or disease, women adjusting to life with a prosthetic limb face the same challenges as men, with perhaps one added complication: how to wear high-heels? A team of Johns Hopkins University students, working with a Johns Hopkins physician and outside prosthetics experts, has developed an early version of a potential solution.

Posting Zika Conspiracy Theories on Social Media Could Put People at Risk

Social media posters who share unfounded conspiracy theories and pseudoscientific claims about the Zika virus may undermine upcoming efforts to keep the disease from spreading, according to a study published online today by the journal Vaccine.

A Personalized Virtual Heart Predicts the Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

An interdisciplinary Johns Hopkins University team has developed a non-invasive 3-D virtual heart assessment tool to help doctors determine whether a particular patient faces the highest risk of a life-threatening arrhythmia and would benefit most from a defibrillator implant.

Johns Hopkins Launches New Online Master’s Degree in Financial Mathematics

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals, the division of Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering that administers online and part-time graduate programs, has launched a new financial mathematics master’s degree program that can be completed online.

Johns Hopkins Professor Awarded “Early Career” Honor

Rebecca Schulman, an assistant professor in Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering, is among 49 young scientists across the country to receive grants from the U.S. Energy Department’s Office of Science under the agency’s Early Career Research Program.

Student Engineers to Present Projects in Johns Hopkins-City Program

Graffiti scrawlers in Highlandtown, beware: a team of third- and fourth-graders is building a drone to catch you in the act, and also clean the building.

Johns Hopkins Researchers Aim for Safer, More Efficient Rocket Engines

The U.S. Air Force has awarded two contracts totaling $1.48 million to the Energetics Research Group, based within Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering, to help set the stage for the next generation of U.S.-made rocket engines. The funding will be used to reduce risks associated with new technologies that may replace the Russian-made RD-180 engine.

Mapping City Hotspots for Zika Mosquito, ‘Never Will Bite’ Soap Among Winning Ideas at Johns Hopkins Hackathon

Mapping a city to detect Zika mosquito hotspots. Fashion accessories infused with a long-acting mosquito repellant. A special soap that keeps mosquitos away. Those are among the winning ideas from a Johns Hopkins University hackathon that drew participants from Baltimore to Brazil looking for ways to help prevent the spread of the Zika virus.

Do Health Awareness Days Actually Impact Behavior?

Health awareness days are ubiquitous. But does dedicating a day to a serious disease or to healthy living habits actually make a difference in the lives of people who hear about the occasion?A new study, published today in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance by researchers from Johns Hopkins University and other institutions, used modern Big Data analyses to confirm that at least one annual health awareness day does indeed trigger behavior among many of the people who hear about it.

Computer Simulations May Help Golfers Tame the Sport’s ‘Scariest 155 Yards’

Johns Hopkins engineers have devised a computer model to unravel the wicked wind conditions that plague the world’s greatest golfers at a course that hosts one of the sport’s most storied tournaments, The Masters, in Augusta, Ga.

Johns Hopkins Graduate Programs Rank Among U.S. News Best

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in nursing, education, medicine, and biomedical engineering remain among the best in the nation, according to the newest U.S. News & World Report rankings of “Best Graduate Schools.”

Johns Hopkins Joins National Research on New Tech Components

The Johns Hopkins University is establishing a cutting-edge crystal growth facility as part of a national research project meant to revolutionize technology used in consumer products, industry and medicine, the National Science Foundation just announced.

How Do Energy Policies and Climate Change Affect Air Quality—and Our Health?

A new interdisciplinary science team, led by experts from Yale and Johns Hopkins universities and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, will try to figure how power generation trends, climate change and public policy interact to affect air quality. A key goal is to trace how the resulting changes in air pollution may affect the health of people who live and work in the mid-Atlantic area.

Web Search Study Finds a ‘Charlie Sheen Effect’ on HIV Prevention

A Johns Hopkins computer scientist played a key role in a new study that analyzed online news and search engine records to gauge the public’s response to actor Charlie Sheen’s Nov. 17, 2015, disclosure on NBC’s TODAY Show that he was HIV-positive.

Johns Hopkins University Hosts Hackathon for Tech Leaders of Tomorrow

Johns Hopkins University will stage the bi‐annual weekend hackathon testing some of the brightest minds not just on campus, but from all over the country.