About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Research Shows Nerve Growth Protein Controls Blood Sugar

Research led by a Johns Hopkins University biologist demonstrates the workings of a biochemical pathway that helps control glucose in the bloodstream, a development that could potentially lead to treatments for diabetes.

Mouse Tests Aim to Show How Genes and Environment Join Forces to Cause Disease

When researchers try to uncover the cause of disease, they commonly start with two questions: Did a quirk in the patient’s genes open the door to illness? Did exposure to environmental factors play havoc with the patient’s health? Very often, both troublemakers are at least partly to blame. To provide the most effective treatment, doctors need to know as much as possible about how these partners in sickness and poor health work together.

Computing Tool Will Allow More Accurate Genome Sequencing

Scientists’ effort to piece together the genome is taking a significant step forward with a new computerized method that creates more complete and detailed versions of the complex puzzle of life than have ever been produced before.

Multi-Million-Dollar Research Effort Aims to Cripple Cancer’s Deadly Ability to Spread

Supported by a $9-million grant from the National Cancer Institute, a diverse team led by Johns Hopkins researchers has begun looking for new ways to attack one of the scariest traits of this disease: its frequent refusal to stay in one place.

Klag to End 12-Year Run as Dean of Public Health

Michael J. Klag, dean of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health since 2005, a 32-year member of the university community and a world expert on the epidemiology of major chronic diseases, will step down as dean next year and return to research and teaching.

Light Tames Lethal Heart Disorders in Mice and Virtual Humans

Using high-tech human heart models and mouse experiments, scientists at Johns Hopkins and Germany’s University of Bonn have shown that beams of light could replace electric shocks in patients reeling from a deadly heart rhythm disorder. The findings, published online Sept. 12 in the October 2016 edition of The Journal of Clinical Investigation, could pave the way for a new type of implantable defibrillators.

Johns Hopkins Scientist Named to Popular Science “Brilliant 10”

Suchi Saria, a computer scientist at Johns Hopkins University, has been named as one of Popular Science’s Brilliant 10, the magazine’s annual list of the “brightest young minds in science and engineering.”

MIT Technology Review Honors Johns Hopkins Engineer as a Top Young Innovator

Muyinatu A. Lediju Bell, a Johns Hopkins engineering professor who designs medical imaging systems that link light, sound and robotics to produce clearer pictures, was honored today by MIT Technology Review, which placed her on its prestigious 2016 list of 35 Innovators Under 35. The list annually spotlights the nation’s most promising young scientists.

Students Seek to Reduce Deaths From Battlefield Injuries That Block Breathing

When a battlefield explosion injures a soldier’s face or neck, the critical air passage between the head and lungs often becomes blocked, which can lead to brain damage and death within minutes. To help treat such injuries, a Johns Hopkins undergraduate team has designed a low-cost, low-tech device dubbed CricSpike that may boost the success rate when combat medics need to create an artificial airway and pump air into the lungs.

Protein Found to Bolster Growth of Damaged Muscle Tissue

Johns Hopkins University biologists have found that a protein that plays a key role in the lives of stem cells can bolster the growth of damaged muscle tissue, a step that could potentially contribute to treatments for muscle degeneration caused by old age and diseases such as muscular dystrophy.

Posting Zika Conspiracy Theories on Social Media Could Put People at Risk

Social media posters who share unfounded conspiracy theories and pseudoscientific claims about the Zika virus may undermine upcoming efforts to keep the disease from spreading, according to a study published online today by the journal Vaccine.

A Personalized Virtual Heart Predicts the Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

An interdisciplinary Johns Hopkins University team has developed a non-invasive 3-D virtual heart assessment tool to help doctors determine whether a particular patient faces the highest risk of a life-threatening arrhythmia and would benefit most from a defibrillator implant.

Johns Hopkins Scientist Programs Robot for “Soft Tissue” Surgery

Simon Leonard, a Johns Hopkins University computer scientist is part of a team that just published research showing that a robot surgeon can indeed adjust to the subtle movement and deformation of soft tissue to execute precise and consistent suturing. The research, which appears in the journal Science Translational Medicine promises to improve results for patients and make the best surgical techniques more widely available.

Johns Hopkins Faculty Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Four Johns Hopkins University faculty members are among the new scholars elected to the National Academy of Sciences today in recognition of their “distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.”

Johns Hopkins Professor Awarded “Early Career” Honor

Rebecca Schulman, an assistant professor in Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering, is among 49 young scientists across the country to receive grants from the U.S. Energy Department’s Office of Science under the agency’s Early Career Research Program.

Mapping City Hotspots for Zika Mosquito, ‘Never Will Bite’ Soap Among Winning Ideas at Johns Hopkins Hackathon

Mapping a city to detect Zika mosquito hotspots. Fashion accessories infused with a long-acting mosquito repellant. A special soap that keeps mosquitos away. Those are among the winning ideas from a Johns Hopkins University hackathon that drew participants from Baltimore to Brazil looking for ways to help prevent the spread of the Zika virus.

Johns Hopkins Graduate Programs Rank Among U.S. News Best

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in nursing, education, medicine, and biomedical engineering remain among the best in the nation, according to the newest U.S. News & World Report rankings of “Best Graduate Schools.”

Johns Hopkins Launches Center to Reshape Medical Care

The Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare builds on the School of Engineering’s history of successful collaborations across the Johns Hopkins institutions, including with the university’s renowned School of Medicine, and will create clinician-engineering teams focused on three priority areas of innovation: data analytics, systems design and analysis, and technology and devices.

Johns Hopkins Biologist Scott Bailey Receives $250,000 President’s Frontier Award

A public health biologist who is trying to stop the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and pave the way to new treatments for genetic diseases has received the 2016 President’s Frontier Award, a Johns Hopkins University honor that provides $250,000 in research funding. The program was launched last year as part of an expanded university effort to provide more funding to help its faculty move forward with innovative research projects. This year’s recipient is Scott Bailey, an associate professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, within the university’s Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Five Johns Hopkins Engineering Doctoral Students Honored as 2016 Siebel Scholars

Five Johns Hopkins graduate students, recently named to the 2016 class of Siebel Scholars, are each pursuing bioengineering projects that could lead to important new diagnostic and treatment advances in healthcare. The merit-based Siebel program has recognized their research skills, academic achievements and leadership qualities by providing $35,000 to each of the five PhD candidates for use in his or her final year of graduate studies.

Why Some People Would Pay for a Drug They Probably Won’t Ever Need

A sick person is obviously willing to pay for a good medical treatment, but a Johns Hopkins University economist and his collaborators finds healthy people are potentially a much broader, if largely overlooked, market for medical innovations.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Club to Dedicate Room to University’s Nobel Laureates

The Johns Hopkins Club is opening its new Nobel Room, dedicated to the 36 Johns Hopkins university faculty members, graduates and other affiliates who have won Nobel Prizes.

Johns Hopkins and DuPont Join Forces to Produce an Improved Ebola Protection Suit

The Johns Hopkins University and DuPont have signed license and collaboration agreements allowing DuPont to commercialize a garment with innovative features from Johns Hopkins to help protect people on the front lines of the Ebola crisis and future deadly infectious disease outbreaks. DuPont intends to have the first of these garments available in the marketplace during the first half of 2016.

Johns Hopkins Medical Robotics Pioneer Russell H. Taylor to Receive 2015 Honda Prize

Russell H. Taylor, a Johns Hopkins professor who is widely hailed as the father of medical robotics, has been selected to receive the 2015 Honda Prize. The selection was announced Sept. 28 by the Honda Foundation, which initiated this honor in 1980 as Japan’s first international science and technology award.

Johns Hopkins’ Ebola Protective Suit Honored in Fast Company ‘Innovation by Design Awards’

The Johns Hopkins University’s new personal protective suit for front-line health care workers in Ebola outbreaks has been honored as one of 10 finalists in the Social Good category of Fast Company’s 2015 Innovation by Design Awards.