About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Faculty Members Elected To National Academy of Medicine

Six faculty members from the Johns Hopkins University have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine.

High Water Bills Can Unintentionally Harm Disadvantaged Tenants

Landlords in disadvantaged communities are so unsettled by increasing water bills and nuisance fees they are taking it out their tenants, threatening the housing security of those who need it most, a new Johns Hopkins University study concludes.

ADVISORY: At JHU This Weekend, Students to Hack to Improve City Life

More than 300 graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University for the latest 36-hour HopHacks, a marathon session challenging students to come up with software and hardware ideas.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available

Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available.

Science and Health News Tips from Johns Hopkins

News tips for reporters from stories in the spring 2018 issue of Johns Hopkins Magazine.

Kidney Disease Expert Wins University’s Frontier Award

Deidra Crews, an expert on chronic kidney disease and on racial disparities in the condition’s impact and treatment, is the 2018 winner of the university’s $250,000 President’s Frontier Award. With video of surprise presentation.

Coalition Seeks to Increase Transparency on Life Science Career Prospects

Nine U.S. research universities, incliuding Johns Hopkins, and a major cancer institute announced plans to give would-be life scientists clear, standardized data on graduate school admissions, education and training opportunities, and career prospects.

Researchers Devise Sensors and Phone App to Find Early Signs of Sickness in Newborns

A Johns Hopkins University team that includes biomedical engineering faculty and graduate students, global health experts and technology specialists will receive a $100,000 grant to support their plan to enable mothers in remote villages to use novel, low-cost sensors and a simple cell phone app to spot serious health problems during their newborn babies’ critical first week. The university’s NeMo team, short for Neonatal Monitoring, was named as one of 51 new Grand Challenges Explorations winners in an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Climate Change Likely to be More Deadly in Poor African Settlements

Conditions in crowded, urban settlements in Africa make worse the effects of climate change, pushing temperatures to dangerous heights for children and the elderly in those areas, according to a new study led by a Johns Hopkins University scientist.

Scientists Use Satellites, Population Data to Build Malaria Early Warning System

A Johns Hopkins University scientist is part of a team working on a method to predict malaria outbreaks months in advance, potentially giving public health officials a chance to protect people from a disease that poses a risk to nearly half the world’s population and kills hundreds of thousands a year.

Science and Health News Tips from Johns Hopkins

These news tips, from stories in the fall 2017 issue of Johns Hopkins Magazine, include an engineer/fisherman’s idea for a “smart” lure and the need for a really high SPF sunscreen for a new solar probe.

MEDIA ADVISORY: More Hurricane Experts from Johns Hopkins University

This is an additional list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on issues associated with Hurricane Harvey and now Hurricane Irma

MEDIA ADVISORY: More Hurricane Harvey Experts from Johns Hopkins University

This is a third list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on issues associated with the onslaught and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

MEDIA ADVISORY: More Hurricane Harvey Experts from Johns Hopkins University

This is a second list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on issues associated with the onslaught and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Hurricane Experts from Johns Hopkins University

A list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on various issues associated with the formation, onslaught and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. This list will be updated as warranted.

MacKenzie Named Dean of Public Health

Ellen J. MacKenzie, an expert on improving trauma care systems and policy and a nationally renowned researcher, veteran academic leader, and Johns Hopkins faculty member since 1979, will be the 11th dean of the university’s Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Johns Hopkins Launches Effort to Improve Civic Engagement

The Stavros Niarchos Foundation has committed $150 million to Johns Hopkins University to forge new ways to address the deterioration of civic engagement worldwide.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Researchers to Present Their Work on Capitol Hill

Early career scientists, physicians, engineers and specialists in public health, nursing, music and marketing from Johns Hopkins University will gather on Capitol Hill in Washington to present their federally-funded research, emphasizing the importance of continuing federal support in the pursuit of new knowledge and innovation.

Teens in Poorest Families Go Hungry More Than Younger Kids

In very poor families, teenagers are going hungry twice as often as their younger siblings, a new Johns Hopkins University study finds.

Subsidized Housing Works Better for Some Kids Than Others

Living in subsidized housing seems to give a boost to children with high standardized test scores and few behavior problems, but it has the opposite effect on students who score poorly and have behavioral issues, a new study finds.

Mouse Tests Aim to Show How Genes and Environment Join Forces to Cause Disease

When researchers try to uncover the cause of disease, they commonly start with two questions: Did a quirk in the patient’s genes open the door to illness? Did exposure to environmental factors play havoc with the patient’s health? Very often, both troublemakers are at least partly to blame. To provide the most effective treatment, doctors need to know as much as possible about how these partners in sickness and poor health work together.

Klag to End 12-Year Run as Dean of Public Health

Michael J. Klag, dean of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health since 2005, a 32-year member of the university community and a world expert on the epidemiology of major chronic diseases, will step down as dean next year and return to research and teaching.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Experts Available to Discuss Election Topics

The following Johns Hopkins University experts, whose research focuses on such subjects as race, economic policy, inequality, gun violence, law enforcement and health care, are available for interviews during the presidential election season.

Johns Hopkins Students Design Ebola Protection Suit Improvements

Two Johns Hopkins mechanical engineering teams have developed improvements for a protective suit for health workers treating people stricken with Ebola and other infectious diseases, including prototypes for a more comfortable hood and face mask that make breathing easier, and for a battery-powered system that curbs humidity in the suit.

Posting Zika Conspiracy Theories on Social Media Could Put People at Risk

Social media posters who share unfounded conspiracy theories and pseudoscientific claims about the Zika virus may undermine upcoming efforts to keep the disease from spreading, according to a study published online today by the journal Vaccine.