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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Two Johns Hopkins Researchers Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Two Johns Hopkins University professors, Aravinda Chakravarti and Donald Geman, are among 84 new members elected to the National Academy of Sciences, an honorary society that advises the government on scientific matters.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Teams of Student Entrepreneurs to Face Judges for $81,000 in Johns Hopkins Business Plan Funding on Friday, May 1

The nationally recognized Johns Hopkins University Business Plan Competition, hosted on Friday, May 1, by the Center for Leadership Education, will feature student teams from various divisions of Johns Hopkins University, as well as students representing The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Yale School of Management, and Tulane University. The teams will compete in one of four categories, for a portion of $81,000 in funding to be announced at a dinner that night.

Tiny Lab Devices Could Attack Huge Problem of Drug-Resistant Infections

A Johns Hopkins engineer, supported by a major NIH grant, is leading a multi-institution team that wants to keep bacterial infections from dodging the dwindling arsenal of drugs that destroy the deadly microbes. The group’s goal is to build palm-size devices that can quickly figure out which germ is causing a hospital-linked infection and then identify the right drug and dosage needed to kill the bacteria.

Media Advisory for Science Writers: Neuroscience will be Focus of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology Symposium

On Friday, May 1, the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) hosts its ninth annual multidisciplinary symposium, featuring six faculty speakers and 100 multidisciplinary research posters. Neuro X is the title and theme for the symposium, which will run from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Owens Auditorium on the Johns Hopkins medical campus.

Chia-Ling Chien Awarded 2015 IUPAP Magnetism Award and Néel Medal

Chia-Ling Chien, a condensed matter physicist at Johns Hopkins University, has received the prestigious 2015 IUPAP Magnetism Award and Néel Medal from the Commission on Magnetism within the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP).

Media Advisory: Student Teams to Compete for State Championship at Maryland Science Olympiad at Johns Hopkins

On Saturday, April 11, about 600 Maryland middle school and high school students and teachers will attend an all-day competition on the Homewood campus to determine the winners of the 2015 Maryland Science Olympiad and the qualifiers for National Science Olympiad.

Prestigious White House Award Cites Johns Hopkins Professor’s Mentoring Skills

J. Tilak Ratnanather, a Johns Hopkins expert in brain mapping, and a champion of people with hearing loss, is a recipient of the Presidential Award of Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring.

Johns Hopkins Appoints Four to Bloomberg Distinguished Professorships

The Johns Hopkins University has named four prominent scientists as its newest Bloomberg Distinguished Professors, unique faculty positions created with a landmark $350 million gift from alumnus and former New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, to foster interdisciplinary collaboration across the institution’s many divisions.

Pixar’s Ed Catmull to Give Commencement Address

Ed Catmull, a co-founder of Pixar Animation Studios, a computer scientist responsible for groundbreaking movie blockbusters like Toy Story and a winner of five Academy Awards, will speak at the Johns Hopkins University’s commencement exercises on Thursday, May 21.

Rare Split Images of Supernova Put Johns Hopkins Astronomer in the Spotlight

A Johns Hopkins astronomer played a key role in the recent discovery of a distant exploding star whose light split into four distinct images in a display just seen for the first time by scientists using the Hubble Space Telescope.

Ultra-Thin Nanowires Can Trap Electron ‘Twisters’ That Disrupt Superconductors

Superconductor materials are prized for their ability to carry an electric current without resistance, but this valuable trait can be crippled or lost when electrons swirl into tiny tornado-like formations called vortices. To keep supercurrents flowing at top speed, Johns Hopkins scientists have figured out how to constrain troublesome vortices by trapping them within extremely short, ultra-thin nanowires.

Weekend Media Advisory: 47 Baltimore City School Teams to Compete Saturday in Robotics Contest at Johns Hopkins

On Saturday, Feb. 14, more than 150 middle and high school students from Baltimore City Public Schools will compete at Johns Hopkins in the Textron Systems Hopkins Robotics Cup, an event that yields the winners of the Baltimore City Mentor League VEX Robotics Championship.

Johns Hopkins 1st in Research Spending for 35th Straight Year

The Johns Hopkins University led the U.S. in higher education research spending for the 35th straight year in fiscal 2013, with $2.2 billion for medical, science and engineering research, according to the National Science Foundation.

Successful Johns Hopkins Accelerator Expands to East Baltimore

Building on the success of Johns Hopkins University’s first business accelerator, FastForward, in demand since it opened nearly two years ago, the university is expanding its innovation program to East Baltimore.

Two Johns Hopkins Engineering Faculty Members Receive NSF CAREER Awards

Two junior faculty members in Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering have been selected to receive National Science Foundation CAREER Awards, which recognize the highest level of excellence among early-stage researchers. The recipients are Jaafar El-Awady, an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and Amitabh Basu, an assistant professor in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics.

$250,000 Johns Hopkins President’s Frontier Award Goes to Sharon Gerecht

A Johns Hopkins engineering professor who is coaxing stem cells into forming blood vessels that can nurture healthy tissue or starve cancer cells is the first recipient of a new university award that provides $250,000 in research funding. The inaugural President’s Frontier Award was announced Jan. 28 during a surprise presentation at recipient Sharon Gerecht’s lab on the university’s Homewood Campus in Baltimore. Gerecht is an associate professor in the Whiting School of Engineering’s Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

Johns Hopkins Astrophysicist Shares 2015 Dannie Heineman Prize

Johns Hopkins University’s Marc Kamionkowski is a winner of the 2015 Dannie Heineman Prize for Astrophysics, one of the top prizes in the field, the American Astronomical Society (AAS) and the American Institute of Physics (AIP) announced today. The honor, which is awarded annually to outstanding mid-career scientists, carries a cash prize of $10,000 that will be split between Kamionkowski and his co-recipient, David Spergel of Princeton University.

Map of Mysterious Molecules In Our Galaxy Sheds New Light on Century-Old Puzzle

By analyzing the light of hundreds of thousands of celestial objects, Johns Hopkins astronomers from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) have created a unique map of enigmatic molecules in our galaxy that are responsible for puzzling features in the light from stars.The map, which can be viewed at http://is.gd/dibmap , was unveiled Jan. 8 at the 225th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Seattle. “Seeing where these mysterious molecules are located is fascinating,” said Brice Ménard, a professor in the Department of Physics & Astronomy at The Johns Hopkins University.

‘Particle Fever’ Wins Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award in Journalism

David E. Kaplan, a Johns Hopkins professor, theoretical particle physicist and documentary producer, received the 2015 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award in Journalism for his contributions to the production of Particle Fever. Particle Fever was one of 14 journalistic works to receive the prestigious award in 2015.

How Climate Change Could Leave Cities in the Dark

Cities like Miami are all too familiar with hurricane-related power outages. But a Johns Hopkins University analysis finds climate change will give other major metro areas a lot to worry about in the future.

Improved Suit for Ebola Caregivers Selected for Funding in Federal Competition

An advanced protective suit for health care workers who treat Ebola patients, devised by a Johns Hopkins team, is one of the first five awardees in a federal funding contest aimed at quickly devising new tools to combat the deadly disease. The Johns Hopkins prototype is designed to do a better job than current garments in keeping health care workers from coming in contact with Ebola patients’ contagious body fluids, both during treatment and while removing a soiled suit.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Traumatic Brain Injury Expert Available to Discuss the Mechanics of Concussion in Light of Lacrosse Helmet Recall

The recent decertification of two popular lacrosse helmets, the Warrior Regulator and the Cascade Model R, is causing concern for those involved in men’s lacrosse, one of the nation’s fastest-growing sports. The decertification by the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment comes at a time of growing worries about concussions in athletes. At Johns Hopkins, engineers working at the forefront of traumatic brain injury research have created a novel “digital head” that is helping explain why some physical movements of the brain cause severe damage while others do not.

Twitter Posts May Shine a Fresh Light on Mental Illness Trends

Johns Hopkins computers scientists, who have already used Twitter posts to track flu cases, say their techniques also show promise as a tool to gather important information about some common mental illnesses. By reviewing tweets from users who publicly mentioned their diagnosis and by looking for language cues linked to certain disorders, the researchers say, they’ve been able to quickly and inexpensively collect new data on post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, bipolar disorder and seasonal affective disorder.

MEDIA ADVISORY: No Batteries, No Motors in This Barrier Battle Cart Contest

Seventy-five Johns Hopkins freshmen from an introductory mechanical engineering course will compete in this event. Twenty-six teams of two or three students have built devices that must be able to move along the floor and then launch a small projectile over a six-foot-tall barrier and strike a target. For a class project, each team designed a device powered only by mousetraps and rubber bands—no motors, no batteries.

New Online 3-D Tool Seeks Possible Targets To Disable Ebola Virus

Johns Hopkins biomedical engineers have developed a free, browser-based online tool that could speed up the creation of new drugs to treat or prevent Ebola virus infections. The software, called MuPIT Ebola Edition, enables a researcher to visualize Ebola gene mutations in the context of three-dimensional protein structures. It also offers views of antibody binding sites called epitopes that are situated on protein surfaces. These sites may give researchers new targets for preventive vaccines and serums to treat those who are already infected.

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