About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Media Advisory: Astronaut Kate Rubins to Speak at Johns Hopkins University

Kate Rubins, the first person to sequence DNA in space aboard the International Space Station last year, will talk about her work as a scientist and astronaut.

Nine Johns Hopkins Engineers Named AIMBE Fellows

Nine faculty members from The Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering have been named Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

New Gene Sequencing Software Could Aid in Early Detection, Treatment of Cancer

A research team from the United States and Canada has developed and successfully tested new computational software that determines whether a human DNA sample includes an epigenetic add-on linked to cancer and other adverse health conditions.

Media Advisory: Hundreds of College Students to Convene at JHU for Weekend of HopHacks

Graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University for the latest HopHacks, a marathon session challenging students to realize their best software and hardware ideas and compete for cash and other sponsored prizes.

52 Baltimore City School Teams to Compete in Robotics Contest at Johns Hopkins

On Saturday, Feb. 4, more than 200 middle and high school students from Baltimore City Public Schools will compete in the Hopkins Robotics Cup, the Baltimore City VEX and VEX IQ Robotics League championship event. This engineering challenge, which changes every year, is presented in the form of a game.

Wanted: Self-Driving Cells to Pursue Deadly Bacteria

Drawing on their expertise in control systems and cell biology, Johns Hopkins University researchers are setting out to design and test troops of self-directed microscopic warriors that can locate and neutralize dangerous strains of bacteria.

MEDIA ADVISORY: What Happens When Hackers Hijack Our Smart Devices?

In a recent segment on NPR’s TED Radio Hour, Johns Hopkins cybersecurity expert Avi Rubin warned that our increasing reliance on Internet-connected add-ons to our home appliances and vehicles could yield unwelcome consequences.

Captured on Video: DNA Nanotubes Build a Bridge Between Two Molecular Posts

In a microscopic feat that resembled a high-wire circus act, Johns Hopkins researchers have coaxed DNA nanotubes to assemble themselves into bridge-like structures arched between two molecular landmarks on the surface of a lab dish. The team captured examples of this unusual nanoscale performance on video.

New Bioinformatics Tool Tests Methods for Finding Mutant Genes That ‘Drive’ Cancer

Among the numerous new tactics that aim to spotlight the so-called cancer driver genes, which produce the most accurate results? To help solve this puzzle, a team of Johns Hopkins computational scientists and cancer experts have devised their own bioinformatics software to evaluate how well the current strategies identify cancer-promoting mutations and distinguish them from benign mutations in cancer cells.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Students Will Use Mousetrap and Rubber Band Power to Launch Blue Jay Beanie Babies

Johns Hopkins Freshman Engineering Contest Allows No Batteries or Other Electronics
WHEN: 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 7.

WHERE: On stage in the Shriver Hall Auditorium on The Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, Md.

Multi-Million-Dollar Research Effort Aims to Cripple Cancer’s Deadly Ability to Spread

Supported by a $9-million grant from the National Cancer Institute, a diverse team led by Johns Hopkins researchers has begun looking for new ways to attack one of the scariest traits of this disease: its frequent refusal to stay in one place.

Light Tames Lethal Heart Disorders in Mice and Virtual Humans

Using high-tech human heart models and mouse experiments, scientists at Johns Hopkins and Germany’s University of Bonn have shown that beams of light could replace electric shocks in patients reeling from a deadly heart rhythm disorder. The findings, published online Sept. 12 in the October 2016 edition of The Journal of Clinical Investigation, could pave the way for a new type of implantable defibrillators.

Online Master’s Degree in Data Science Now Offered at Johns Hopkins

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals, the division of Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering that offers online and part-time graduate programs, has launched a new master’s degree program in data science that students can complete online.

MIT Technology Review Honors Johns Hopkins Engineer as a Top Young Innovator

Muyinatu A. Lediju Bell, a Johns Hopkins engineering professor who designs medical imaging systems that link light, sound and robotics to produce clearer pictures, was honored today by MIT Technology Review, which placed her on its prestigious 2016 list of 35 Innovators Under 35. The list annually spotlights the nation’s most promising young scientists.

Cyber Security Experts to Discuss Attack Defense, Response

How do hackers crack a computer system and steal data? How should organizations protect themselves? How should they prepare for and respond to attack? These are among the questions that will be addressed by experts in the field at the third annual Senior Executive Cyber Security Conference to be held Wednesday, Sept. 21 at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

Students Seek to Reduce Deaths From Battlefield Injuries That Block Breathing

When a battlefield explosion injures a soldier’s face or neck, the critical air passage between the head and lungs often becomes blocked, which can lead to brain damage and death within minutes. To help treat such injuries, a Johns Hopkins undergraduate team has designed a low-cost, low-tech device dubbed CricSpike that may boost the success rate when combat medics need to create an artificial airway and pump air into the lungs.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Lead Effort to Protect Vital Networks

Johns Hopkins University computer scientists have led an effort to create a proven way to prevent sabotage from disrupting electronic networks supporting major infrastructure such as power grids and the electronic cloud.

Novel Controller Allows Video Gamer Who Lacks Hands to Compete With His Feet

It’s tough to play video games when you have no fingers to push buttons on the controller. Just ask Gyorgy (George) Levay, an avid gamer who lost both hands to a meningitis infection five years ago. But Levay and two fellow Johns Hopkins grad students have devised a clever way get him, and others with similar disabilities, back in the game.

Johns Hopkins Students Design Ebola Protection Suit Improvements

Two Johns Hopkins mechanical engineering teams have developed improvements for a protective suit for health workers treating people stricken with Ebola and other infectious diseases, including prototypes for a more comfortable hood and face mask that make breathing easier, and for a battery-powered system that curbs humidity in the suit.

Johns Hopkins Team Makes Hobby Drones Crash to Expose Design Flaws

Sales of drones—small flying machines equipped with cameras—are soaring. But new research by a Johns Hopkins computer security team has raised concerns about how easily hackers could cause these robotic devices to ignore their human controllers and land or, more drastically, crash.

Posting Zika Conspiracy Theories on Social Media Could Put People at Risk

Social media posters who share unfounded conspiracy theories and pseudoscientific claims about the Zika virus may undermine upcoming efforts to keep the disease from spreading, according to a study published online today by the journal Vaccine.

Telescope Peering into Origins of the Universe Receives “First Light”

High in the Andes Mountains of northern Chile a unique Johns Hopkins University observatory has just achieved “first light,” the first time the telescope has collected radiation from space.

A Personalized Virtual Heart Predicts the Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

An interdisciplinary Johns Hopkins University team has developed a non-invasive 3-D virtual heart assessment tool to help doctors determine whether a particular patient faces the highest risk of a life-threatening arrhythmia and would benefit most from a defibrillator implant.

Johns Hopkins Researchers Aim for Safer, More Efficient Rocket Engines

The U.S. Air Force has awarded two contracts totaling $1.48 million to the Energetics Research Group, based within Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering, to help set the stage for the next generation of U.S.-made rocket engines. The funding will be used to reduce risks associated with new technologies that may replace the Russian-made RD-180 engine.

Mapping City Hotspots for Zika Mosquito, ‘Never Will Bite’ Soap Among Winning Ideas at Johns Hopkins Hackathon

Mapping a city to detect Zika mosquito hotspots. Fashion accessories infused with a long-acting mosquito repellant. A special soap that keeps mosquitos away. Those are among the winning ideas from a Johns Hopkins University hackathon that drew participants from Baltimore to Brazil looking for ways to help prevent the spread of the Zika virus.