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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Posting Zika Conspiracy Theories on Social Media Could Put People at Risk

Social media posters who share unfounded conspiracy theories and pseudoscientific claims about the Zika virus may undermine upcoming efforts to keep the disease from spreading, according to a study published online today by the journal Vaccine.

Telescope Peering into Origins of the Universe Receives “First Light”

High in the Andes Mountains of northern Chile a unique Johns Hopkins University observatory has just achieved “first light,” the first time the telescope has collected radiation from space.

A Personalized Virtual Heart Predicts the Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

An interdisciplinary Johns Hopkins University team has developed a non-invasive 3-D virtual heart assessment tool to help doctors determine whether a particular patient faces the highest risk of a life-threatening arrhythmia and would benefit most from a defibrillator implant.

Johns Hopkins Researchers Aim for Safer, More Efficient Rocket Engines

The U.S. Air Force has awarded two contracts totaling $1.48 million to the Energetics Research Group, based within Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering, to help set the stage for the next generation of U.S.-made rocket engines. The funding will be used to reduce risks associated with new technologies that may replace the Russian-made RD-180 engine.

Mapping City Hotspots for Zika Mosquito, ‘Never Will Bite’ Soap Among Winning Ideas at Johns Hopkins Hackathon

Mapping a city to detect Zika mosquito hotspots. Fashion accessories infused with a long-acting mosquito repellant. A special soap that keeps mosquitos away. Those are among the winning ideas from a Johns Hopkins University hackathon that drew participants from Baltimore to Brazil looking for ways to help prevent the spread of the Zika virus.

Do Health Awareness Days Actually Impact Behavior?

Health awareness days are ubiquitous. But does dedicating a day to a serious disease or to healthy living habits actually make a difference in the lives of people who hear about the occasion?A new study, published today in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance by researchers from Johns Hopkins University and other institutions, used modern Big Data analyses to confirm that at least one annual health awareness day does indeed trigger behavior among many of the people who hear about it.

Computer Simulations May Help Golfers Tame the Sport’s ‘Scariest 155 Yards’

Johns Hopkins engineers have devised a computer model to unravel the wicked wind conditions that plague the world’s greatest golfers at a course that hosts one of the sport’s most storied tournaments, The Masters, in Augusta, Ga.

Johns Hopkins Joins National Research on New Tech Components

The Johns Hopkins University is establishing a cutting-edge crystal growth facility as part of a national research project meant to revolutionize technology used in consumer products, industry and medicine, the National Science Foundation just announced.

How Do Energy Policies and Climate Change Affect Air Quality—and Our Health?

A new interdisciplinary science team, led by experts from Yale and Johns Hopkins universities and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, will try to figure how power generation trends, climate change and public policy interact to affect air quality. A key goal is to trace how the resulting changes in air pollution may affect the health of people who live and work in the mid-Atlantic area.

Web Search Study Finds a ‘Charlie Sheen Effect’ on HIV Prevention

A Johns Hopkins computer scientist played a key role in a new study that analyzed online news and search engine records to gauge the public’s response to actor Charlie Sheen’s Nov. 17, 2015, disclosure on NBC’s TODAY Show that he was HIV-positive.

Johns Hopkins University Hosts Hackathon for Tech Leaders of Tomorrow

Johns Hopkins University will stage the bi‐annual weekend hackathon testing some of the brightest minds not just on campus, but from all over the country.

Five Johns Hopkins Engineering Doctoral Students Honored as 2016 Siebel Scholars

Five Johns Hopkins graduate students, recently named to the 2016 class of Siebel Scholars, are each pursuing bioengineering projects that could lead to important new diagnostic and treatment advances in healthcare. The merit-based Siebel program has recognized their research skills, academic achievements and leadership qualities by providing $35,000 to each of the five PhD candidates for use in his or her final year of graduate studies.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Mousetraps, Rubber Bands and Bowling Balls Will Provide Power in Student Contest

Forty-four Johns Hopkins freshmen from an introductory mechanical engineering course will compete. Teams of two or three students have each built devices that are designed to roll across the Shriver Hall stage and then launch a small projectile over a dozen rows of seats before landing in Row M.

Johns Hopkins Solves a Longtime Puzzle of How We Learn

More than a century ago Pavlov figured out that dogs fed after hearing a bell eventually began to salivate when they heard the ring. A Johns Hopkins University-led research team has now figured out a key aspect of why.

Tiny Dancers: Can Ballet Bugs Help Us Build Better Robots?

When it’s time to design new robots, sometimes the best inspiration can come from Mother Nature. Take, for example, her creepy, but incredibly athletic spider crickets. Johns Hopkins engineering students and their professor have spent more than eight months unraveling the hopping skills, airborne antics and safe-landing patterns of these pesky insects that commonly lurk in the dark corners of damp basements.

Johns Hopkins Medical Robotics Pioneer Russell H. Taylor to Receive 2015 Honda Prize

Russell H. Taylor, a Johns Hopkins professor who is widely hailed as the father of medical robotics, has been selected to receive the 2015 Honda Prize. The selection was announced Sept. 28 by the Honda Foundation, which initiated this honor in 1980 as Japan’s first international science and technology award.

FEMA Data Official Joins Center for Government Excellence

Carter Hewgley, former head of analytics for the Federal Emergency Management Agency, has joined a Johns Hopkins University project to make cities’ data more accessible and help solve urban problems.

Johns Hopkins Joins National Sustainable Nanotechnology Project

Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University have joined a national effort to produce environmentally friendly materials built at the atomic and molecular scale.The environmental impact of materials used in emerging areas of nanotechnology – used, for instance, in video screens, solar cells and electric car batteries – is largely unknown, but scientists working across the country under a new federal grant hope to learn how these products affect the natural world before their commercial use expands.

Johns Hopkins Partners with Coursera to Offer Five New Online Courses Plus Capstone Project in Web Development

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals, the division of the Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering that administers online and part-time graduate programs, is launching a new series of online courses in Web development through Coursera, the world’s largest open online education provider.

Cyber Security Experts to Discuss Tricky Balance Between Data Sharing and Privacy

In its efforts to curb criminal activity, should the government be allowed to see confidential consumer data collected by businesses? Or does the right to privacy trump such intrusions? These complex questions will be the focus of the second annual Senior Executive Cyber Security Conference, to be held Thursday, Sept. 10, at Johns Hopkins University. Registration for the daylong event is under way.

$2.2 Million NSF Grant Will Help Johns Hopkins Train New Cybersecurity Experts

At a time when cybersecurity attacks are more frequent and damaging, the National Science Foundation has awarded $2.2 million to the Johns Hopkins University Information Security Institute to support a graduate-level degree program that teaches students how to recognize and protect against digital threats. The grant will be allocated over five years as part of the Federal CyberCorps: Scholarship for Service Program.

Johns Hopkins University Chemist’s Project Lands Major Federal Grant

A Johns Hopkins University chemist is leading research groups from five schools that won a $7.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense for materials science work that could lead to advancements in electronics, computers, optics and weapons technology.

New Computing Center in Baltimore Will Offer Bigger Home for ‘Big Data’ Projects

Whether they’re studying distant galaxies or deadly diseases deep within human cells, Big Data researchers increasingly need more powerful computers and more digital storage space. To address this demand, two Maryland universities are preparing to open one of the nation’s largest academic high-performance computing centers, located at the edge of the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center campus in Baltimore.

Johns Hopkins Boosts Online Options with Applied Biomedical Engineering Master’s Degree

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals, the division of the Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering that administers part-time and online graduate programs, has announced that students can now complete its Applied Biomedical Engineering program online.

Tamper-Resistant Pill Dispenser Aims to Stamp Out Medication Misuse

You can whack it with a hammer, attack it with a drill, or even stab it with a screwdriver. But try as you might, you won’t be able to tamper with a high-tech pill dispenser designed by mechanical engineering students at Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering. Which is exactly the point.