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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

New Milky Way Maps Help Solve Stubborn Interstellar Material Mystery

An international team of sky scholars, including a key researcher from Johns Hopkins, has produced new maps of the material located between the stars in the Milky Way. The results should move astronomers closer to cracking a stardust puzzle that has vexed them for nearly a century.

Google’s ATAP and Johns Hopkins University Team Up in Tech Development Pact

The Johns Hopkins University has entered into a partnership agreement with Google’s Advanced Technology and Projects (ATAP) group, aimed at speeding up the development of new technology and moving the resulting products toward the marketplace more quickly. The agreement, approved recently by both parties, will enable ATAP to draw on the expertise of Johns Hopkins computer scientists and other experts, and approve funds for joint technology projects in as little as 30 days. That turnaround time is much shorter than the period usually required for obtaining grants from governments agencies and private organizations.

Injectable Foam Could Prevent Fatal Blood Loss in Wounded Soldiers

Without prompt care, a badly wounded soldier can easily bleed to death while being transported to a distant medical station. Two traditional treatments—tourniquets and medicated gauze pads—often cannot stop the blood loss from a deep wound at the neck, shoulder or groin. To give these soldiers a fighting chance at survival, Johns Hopkins undergraduates have invented an injectable foam system designed to stop profuse bleeding from a wound where a limb or the head is connected to the torso.

19th Century Math Tactic Gets a Makeover—and Yields Answers Up to 200 Times Faster

A relic from long before the age of supercomputers, the 169-year-old math strategy called the Jacobi iterative method is widely dismissed today as too slow to be useful. But thanks to a curious, numbers-savvy Johns Hopkins engineering student and his professor, it may soon get a new lease on life.

NSF Selects Johns Hopkins’ Langmead for Early CAREER Award

Benjamin Langmead, assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science at Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering, has been chosen by the National Science Foundation to receive its prestigious CAREER Award, which recognizes the high level of promise and excellence in early-stage scholars.

Students’ Heart-Shocking ‘Shirt’ May Save Lives When Paramedics Are Not Nearby

Johns Hopkins biomedical engineering students have designed a lightweight, easy-to-conceal shirt-like garment to deliver life-saving shocks to patients experiencing serious heart problems. The students say their design improves upon a wearable defibrillator system that is already in use. Their design changes, the students say, should help persuade patients at risk for sudden cardiac arrest to wear the system around the clock.

Johns Hopkins Opens Doors with New Online Master of Engineering Management

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals, the division of the Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering that administers part-time graduate programs, has announced the launch of a new master’s degree in engineering management.

Master’s Degree in Space Systems Engineering Lifts Off at Johns Hopkins University

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals, which administers part-time graduate studies for the university’s Whiting School of Engineering, has launched a new master’s degree program in space systems engineering.

JHU, Morgan State University Establish New Educational Partnership

Johns Hopkins University and Morgan State University today joined forces in a new collaborative educational program designed to combine the strengths of both institutions to benefit their students and faculty members, as well as the fields of science and engineering. The “Extreme Science Internships” program will build a bridge between talented science and engineering students at Morgan State and faculty and researchers at the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute (HEMI) at the Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering, as well as other universities, laboratories and research institutes across nine states and Germany.

Water-Based ‘Engine’ Propels Tumor Cells Through Tight Spaces in the Body

Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered a new mechanism that explains how cancer cells spread through extremely narrow three-dimensional spaces in the body by using a propulsion system based on water and charged particles. The finding, reported in the April 24 issue of the journal Cell, uncovers a novel way that the deadly cells use to migrate through a cancer patient’s body. The discovery may lead to new treatments that help keep the disease in check.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Student Teams to Compete for Johns Hopkins Business Plan Prize Money on Friday, April 25

The nationally recognized Johns Hopkins University Business Plan Competition, hosted by the Center for Leadership Education, encourages students to take a novel idea or innovative technology and develop a business plan around it. Student presentations and judging will take place from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, April 25, in Hodson Hall on the university’s Homewood campus.

Design Flaw in ‘Secure’ Cloud Storage Could Put Privacy at Risk, Researchers Say

Johns Hopkins computer scientists have found a flaw in the way that secure cloud storage companies protect their customers’ data. The scientists say this weakness jeopardizes the privacy protection these digital warehouses claim to offer. Whenever customers share their confidential files with a trusted friend or colleague, the researchers say, the storage provider could exploit the security flaw to secretly view this private data.

Media Advisory: 34 Baltimore City School Teams to Compete Saturday, April 5, in Robotics Contest at Johns Hopkins

On Saturday, April 5, in the Newton White Athletic Center on The Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus, more than 100 middle and high school students from Baltimore City Public Schools will compete in the Hopkins Robotics Cup, the Baltimore City VEX Robotics Championship competition. The event is being hosted by the Center for Educational Outreach at Johns Hopkins’ Whiting School of Engineering, in partnership with Baltimore City Public Schools. The Center’s mission is to increase the number of youth who pursue science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education and careers, particularly women and underrepresented minorities.

Batter Up! Student Math Wizards Aim for the Fences with Baseball Scheduling System

Major League Baseball has begun to get some high-tech help with scheduling. But for their 15 affiliated minor leagues, assembling the multi-team, multi-game calendar remains a tedious, time-consuming task that must be completed by hand. Soon, there may be a better way. Johns Hopkins students and faculty members have started tossing advanced math and powerful computing tools at the arcane art of planning game dates. The result is a new scheduling system that has piqued the interest of minor baseball league executives—and may prove to be useful in applications beyond the ballpark.

When the Flu Bug Bites the Big Apple, Twitter Posts Can Tell the Tale

In recent years, Johns Hopkins researchers have shown that tweets can help trace nationwide trends in flu outbreaks. Now, in a new study, a team from Johns Hopkins and George Washington universities has drilled even deeper, probing flu-related tweets from a single bustling metropolis: New York City. Twitter data, the team concluded, can accurately gauge the spread of flu at the local level, too.

Cancer Cells Don’t Engage in ‘Drunken’ Walks as They Spread Through the Body in 3D

Because of results seen in flat lab dishes, biologists have believed that cancers cells move through the body in a slow, aimless fashion, resembling an intoxicated person who cannot walk three steps in a straight line. This pattern, called a random walk, may hold true for cells traveling across two-dimensional lab containers, but Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered that for cells moving through three-dimensional spaces within the body, the “drunken” model doesn’t hold true.

Johns Hopkins Material Scientist Tim Mueller Receives NSF CAREER Award

Tim Mueller, a Johns Hopkins University assistant professor of materials science and engineering, has been selected by the National Science Foundation to receive its prestigious CAREER Award, which recognizes the highest level of excellence and promise in early-stage scholars. His faculty appointment is within the university’s Whiting School of Engineering.

Children’s Brain Imaging Data Bank Could Become a ‘Google’ Tool for Doctors

When an MRI scan uncovers an unusual architecture or shape in a child’s brain, it’s cause for concern: The malformation may be a sign of disease. But deciding whether that odd-looking anatomy is worrisome or harmless can be difficult. To help doctors reach the right decision, Johns Hopkins researchers are building a detailed digital library of MRI scans collected from children with normal and abnormal brains. The goal, the researchers say, is to give physicians a Google-like search system that will enhance the way they diagnose and treat young patients with brain disorders.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Can a Mousetrap-and-Rubber-Band Device Protect a Plummeting Egg?

Fifty-nine Johns Hopkins freshmen from an introductory mechanical engineering course will compete. Twenty student teams of two or three students have built devices that must be able to transport an uncooked chicken egg from a platform six feet off the ground to a target below—without breaking the egg.

MEDIA ADVISORY: How Secure is Personal Data on HealthCare.gov? Johns Hopkins Expert Available for Interviews

Avi Rubin, a Johns Hopkins professor of computer science and director of the university’s Health and Medical Security Lab, testified Nov. 19 before the U.S. House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology at a hearing titled, “Is Your Data on Healthcare.gov Secure?” In a prepared statement submitted to the panel, Rubin said, “HealthCare.gov does not collect nor store Electronic Medical Records, but it does collect whatever personal information is needed for enrollment. This information, in the wrong hands, could potentially be used for identity theft attacks.”

MEDIA ADVISORY: Baltimore Area Middle School Girls to Get Introduction to Engineering

Engineering students at Johns Hopkins are primary organizers and volunteers for “Ready Set Design!” The program aims to cultivate girls’ interest in engineering and engineering careers. About 30 girls from middle schools in Baltimore city and neighboring communities are expected to participate.

Johns Hopkins Students Win Inventors Contest’s Top Prizes for Heart Treatment Device and Cancer Test

A Johns Hopkins undergraduate biomedical engineering student team that devised a two-part system to improve the way life-saving shocks are delivered to hearts earned first-prize in the undergraduate division of a national Collegiate Inventors Competition. In the graduate-level competition, Isaac Kinde, a Johns Hopkins medical student, received third-place honors for developing a test to detect ovarian and endometrial cancers as part of a team at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

Biosensor Could Help Detect Brain Injuries During Heart Surgery

Johns Hopkins engineers and cardiology experts have teamed up to develop a fingernail-sized biosensor that could alert doctors when serious brain injury occurs during heart surgery. By doing so, the device could help doctors devise new ways to minimize brain damage or begin treatment more quickly. In the Nov. 11 issue of the journal Chemical Science, the team reported on lab tests demonstrating that the prototype sensor had successfully detected a protein associated with brain injuries.

Scientists Study Some Fishy Behavior to Solve an Animal Locomotion Mystery

A quirk of nature has long baffled biologists: Why do animals push in directions that don’t point toward their goal, like the side-to-side sashaying of a running lizard or cockroach? An engineer building a robot would likely avoid these movements because they seem wasteful. So why do animals behave this way? A multi-institutional research team, led by Johns Hopkins engineers, says it has solved this puzzle.

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