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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

$2.2 Million NSF Grant Will Help Johns Hopkins Train New Cybersecurity Experts

At a time when cybersecurity attacks are more frequent and damaging, the National Science Foundation has awarded $2.2 million to the Johns Hopkins University Information Security Institute to support a graduate-level degree program that teaches students how to recognize and protect against digital threats. The grant will be allocated over five years as part of the Federal CyberCorps: Scholarship for Service Program.

Johns Hopkins University Chemist’s Project Lands Major Federal Grant

A Johns Hopkins University chemist is leading research groups from five schools that won a $7.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense for materials science work that could lead to advancements in electronics, computers, optics and weapons technology.

New Computing Center in Baltimore Will Offer Bigger Home for ‘Big Data’ Projects

Whether they’re studying distant galaxies or deadly diseases deep within human cells, Big Data researchers increasingly need more powerful computers and more digital storage space. To address this demand, two Maryland universities are preparing to open one of the nation’s largest academic high-performance computing centers, located at the edge of the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center campus in Baltimore.

Johns Hopkins Boosts Online Options with Applied Biomedical Engineering Master’s Degree

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals, the division of the Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering that administers part-time and online graduate programs, has announced that students can now complete its Applied Biomedical Engineering program online.

Tamper-Resistant Pill Dispenser Aims to Stamp Out Medication Misuse

You can whack it with a hammer, attack it with a drill, or even stab it with a screwdriver. But try as you might, you won’t be able to tamper with a high-tech pill dispenser designed by mechanical engineering students at Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering. Which is exactly the point.

Johns Hopkins Math Students a Hit With Minor League Baseball Schedulers

With the help of some Johns Hopkins University math students, Minor League Baseball is catching up with the majors in using computers to produce its game schedules.

Noninvasive Brain Stimulator May Ease Parkinson’s Symptoms in a Patient’s Home

Parkinson’s disease patients whose symptoms such as tremor, muscle stiffness and slowed movement make it tough to hold an eating utensil steady have few options for relief outside of a hospital or clinic. To give these patients another in-home treatment option, Johns Hopkins graduate students have invented a headband-shaped device to deliver noninvasive brain stimulation to help tamp down the symptoms.

New Kit May Help Train Global Health Providers to Insert and Remove Contraceptive Implants

To address a global health challenge, a team of Johns Hopkins University biomedical engineering undergraduates has developed a teaching set called the Contraceptive Implant Training Tool Kit or CITT Kit, for short. The medical simulator includes two training models: a stand-alone replica arm and a layered band that can be worn by health workers who act as “patients” during practice sessions.

Klausen Awarded Energy Department “Early Career” Honor

Rebekka S. Klausen, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry at the Johns Hopkins University, is among 44 young scientists across the country chosen to receive grants from the U.S. Energy Department’s Office of Science under the agency’s Early Career Research Program.

Two Johns Hopkins Researchers Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Two Johns Hopkins University professors, Aravinda Chakravarti and Donald Geman, are among 84 new members elected to the National Academy of Sciences, an honorary society that advises the government on scientific matters.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Teams of Student Entrepreneurs to Face Judges for $81,000 in Johns Hopkins Business Plan Funding on Friday, May 1

The nationally recognized Johns Hopkins University Business Plan Competition, hosted on Friday, May 1, by the Center for Leadership Education, will feature student teams from various divisions of Johns Hopkins University, as well as students representing The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Yale School of Management, and Tulane University. The teams will compete in one of four categories, for a portion of $81,000 in funding to be announced at a dinner that night.

Tiny Lab Devices Could Attack Huge Problem of Drug-Resistant Infections

A Johns Hopkins engineer, supported by a major NIH grant, is leading a multi-institution team that wants to keep bacterial infections from dodging the dwindling arsenal of drugs that destroy the deadly microbes. The group’s goal is to build palm-size devices that can quickly figure out which germ is causing a hospital-linked infection and then identify the right drug and dosage needed to kill the bacteria.

Media Advisory for Science Writers: Neuroscience will be Focus of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology Symposium

On Friday, May 1, the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) hosts its ninth annual multidisciplinary symposium, featuring six faculty speakers and 100 multidisciplinary research posters. Neuro X is the title and theme for the symposium, which will run from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Owens Auditorium on the Johns Hopkins medical campus.

Chia-Ling Chien Awarded 2015 IUPAP Magnetism Award and Néel Medal

Chia-Ling Chien, a condensed matter physicist at Johns Hopkins University, has received the prestigious 2015 IUPAP Magnetism Award and Néel Medal from the Commission on Magnetism within the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP).

Media Advisory: Student Teams to Compete for State Championship at Maryland Science Olympiad at Johns Hopkins

On Saturday, April 11, about 600 Maryland middle school and high school students and teachers will attend an all-day competition on the Homewood campus to determine the winners of the 2015 Maryland Science Olympiad and the qualifiers for National Science Olympiad.

Prestigious White House Award Cites Johns Hopkins Professor’s Mentoring Skills

J. Tilak Ratnanather, a Johns Hopkins expert in brain mapping, and a champion of people with hearing loss, is a recipient of the Presidential Award of Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring.

Johns Hopkins Appoints Four to Bloomberg Distinguished Professorships

The Johns Hopkins University has named four prominent scientists as its newest Bloomberg Distinguished Professors, unique faculty positions created with a landmark $350 million gift from alumnus and former New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, to foster interdisciplinary collaboration across the institution’s many divisions.

Pixar’s Ed Catmull to Give Commencement Address

Ed Catmull, a co-founder of Pixar Animation Studios, a computer scientist responsible for groundbreaking movie blockbusters like Toy Story and a winner of five Academy Awards, will speak at the Johns Hopkins University’s commencement exercises on Thursday, May 21.

Rare Split Images of Supernova Put Johns Hopkins Astronomer in the Spotlight

A Johns Hopkins astronomer played a key role in the recent discovery of a distant exploding star whose light split into four distinct images in a display just seen for the first time by scientists using the Hubble Space Telescope.

Ultra-Thin Nanowires Can Trap Electron ‘Twisters’ That Disrupt Superconductors

Superconductor materials are prized for their ability to carry an electric current without resistance, but this valuable trait can be crippled or lost when electrons swirl into tiny tornado-like formations called vortices. To keep supercurrents flowing at top speed, Johns Hopkins scientists have figured out how to constrain troublesome vortices by trapping them within extremely short, ultra-thin nanowires.

Weekend Media Advisory: 47 Baltimore City School Teams to Compete Saturday in Robotics Contest at Johns Hopkins

On Saturday, Feb. 14, more than 150 middle and high school students from Baltimore City Public Schools will compete at Johns Hopkins in the Textron Systems Hopkins Robotics Cup, an event that yields the winners of the Baltimore City Mentor League VEX Robotics Championship.

Johns Hopkins 1st in Research Spending for 35th Straight Year

The Johns Hopkins University led the U.S. in higher education research spending for the 35th straight year in fiscal 2013, with $2.2 billion for medical, science and engineering research, according to the National Science Foundation.

Successful Johns Hopkins Accelerator Expands to East Baltimore

Building on the success of Johns Hopkins University’s first business accelerator, FastForward, in demand since it opened nearly two years ago, the university is expanding its innovation program to East Baltimore.

Two Johns Hopkins Engineering Faculty Members Receive NSF CAREER Awards

Two junior faculty members in Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering have been selected to receive National Science Foundation CAREER Awards, which recognize the highest level of excellence among early-stage researchers. The recipients are Jaafar El-Awady, an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and Amitabh Basu, an assistant professor in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics.

$250,000 Johns Hopkins President’s Frontier Award Goes to Sharon Gerecht

A Johns Hopkins engineering professor who is coaxing stem cells into forming blood vessels that can nurture healthy tissue or starve cancer cells is the first recipient of a new university award that provides $250,000 in research funding. The inaugural President’s Frontier Award was announced Jan. 28 during a surprise presentation at recipient Sharon Gerecht’s lab on the university’s Homewood Campus in Baltimore. Gerecht is an associate professor in the Whiting School of Engineering’s Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.